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June 17, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-06-17
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Whe Mfrisioan Daiati
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials orinted in The Michigan Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.
TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 1970 News Phone: 764-0552
Cox leaving FCC with
doubts about successor
T H E FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
(FCC) is about to lose one of its most ablest and earn-
est members. After serving his seven year term as FCC
commissioner, Kenneth A. Cox will be leaving his posi-
tion with a sense of worry over his rumored successor.
His successor will reportedly be John Snyder, the In-
diana state treasurer. The White House has not denied
the report. What worries Cox is Snyder's inexperience.
Ever since 1968, Cox, a Democrat, knew that he was
not going to be reappointed to his post. He said that'he
only had hoped that his successor would have experience
and stature.
Snyder, however, has neither experience nor stature.
His major qualification is that he did President Nixon
a political favor by stepping out of the Republican race
for a Senate seat in Indiana.
To Mr. Cox, the belief that his successor may be
chosen for political reasons is appalling. "I'd told people
with access to the White House," Cox said in a recent in-
terview, "that for the sake of the agency and for the
sake of the chairman (Dean Burch, another Nixon ap-
pointee) I hoped they'd get a top-flight man here. They're
supposed to be a big outfit and have a lot of brains. But
this talk about Snyder is distressing."
COX HIMSELF did not come to FCC without political
credentials. He was special counsel to the Senate Com-
merce Committee's television inquiry of 1956 and was con-
sidered somewhat of a protege of the committee's chair-
man, Senator Warren Magnuson (D-Wash.). But at least
he went to the FCC with relevant experience.
In the past, Cox was disliked by the broadcasting in-
dustry because of his interest in issues affecting program-
ming. But the industry is uneasy about the selection of
Snyder because of his inexperience and also because he
tangled with Indiana broadcasters over political issues.
In the future the FCC will have to be a more effective
agency than it has been in the past because of the new
technology that is invading the broadcasting media.
The loss of Commissioner Cox is a shame, but the ap-
pointment of John Snyder to replace him is a travesty.
-EDWARD ZIMMERMAN
NIGHT EDITOR: ANITA WETTERSTROEM

I

Wednesday, June 17, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Letters to the Editor

Hillage
To the Editor:
MR. VALLANCE painted a very
grim picture of Washtenaw Coun-
ty's educational system in the
years to come. He felt, rightly so,
that for the taxpayers to value ed-
ucation less than the few small
dollars of increased taxation is
criminal. I have two comments:
A group of Washtenaw County
property owners feel that non-
property-owners should not vote
on millage and bonding issues. In
fact, one Republican lady told me
that non-property-owners should
not be allowed to vote an any-
thing! The arguments for this at-
titude are that renters are less
stable segments of our society and
that they do not pay the taxes
that are being levied in such elec-
tions. In fact the renters pay tax-
es through rent payments. And to
the stability argument . . . non-
sense! Students, low-income fam-
ilies, and people who just don't
want the responsibility of owning
property should be represented at
the polls-on all issues including.
the educational systems that will
make or break the society of to-
morrow!
MY SECOND comment concerns
the Michigan Daily ,whose editor-
ial board is obviously not unaware
of the consequences of the millage
defeat if Harvard Vallance's edi-

torial (Daily, June 9) is any in-
dication Had the Daily seen *fit to
encourage the students on this
campus to vote in the June 8 elec-
tion-had the Daily endorsed the
millage proposals-it is likely that
the younger point of view would
have been better represented at
the polls, Yes, the press has a role
in society other than reporting
news (recall Roger Rapoport?).
There is still a chance to re-
deem the county-another election
is coming on Aug. 4 at which these
millage and bonding issues will,
again be an issue. Washtenaw
County's young people need the
help of their peers who are old
enough to vote. Are you reg-
istered?
-Michael Liepman, Med.
June 13
Middle East
To the Editor:
THE MIDDLE EAST, with its
daily series of crises, is obviously
no longer an Israeli or an Arab
question; since the United States
is unlikely to stand by idly as one
side or the other is wiped out; I
feel that it is my business to ex-
plore what is going on over there.
However, certain specific questions
pop into the mind of even the most
casual observer.
With whom should the Israelis
negotiate? Nasser, Al Fatah or

what? Can the Israelis really be
expected to do the Arabs the favor
of liquidating themselves? Should
the only democratic and socially
progressive state that has ever
existed in the Middle-Fast sur-
render to feudalistic dictators and
decadent kings?
Sometimes it is said that a new
Palestine with Arabs and Israelis
living side by side would be a vi-
able alternative to throwing the
Arabs into the desert or the Is-
raelis into the sea. However, I
would say that the Arabs have a
tremendous public relations prob-
lem; rightly or wrongly, they are
all too often looked on as bar-
barians who lie and cheat and
murder babies. Of course, their
duplicity in the UN and the rocket
lauchers at clearly marked Israeli
school buses do not help the mat-
ter much.
AT ANY RATE, I seriously ques-
tion whether anyone, muchless
the Israelis, could live success-
fully with Moslem Arabs. I am
thinking of the something-less-
than-successful delicate balance
between Christian and Moslem
Arabs in Lebanon. I am thinking
of the continuing murder of half
a million black Christians by Mos-
lem Arabs in the Sudan. I am
thinking of the orgy of killing
several years ago of Buddhist Chi-
nese by frenzied Moslem mobs in
Indonesia. I am thinking of the
<merciless repression of the Kurds
by the Moslem Arabs in northern
Iraq. I am thinking of the con-
tinuing hostilities directed toward
Hindus by the Moslem state of

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 74
12 Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

FOR RENT

The Ann Arbor Fair Housing Ordi-
nance and the University of Mich-
igan Regents' bylaws prohibit dis--
crimination in housing. Questions
should be directed to Off-Campus
Housing, 764-7400.
711 ARCH-Near State and Packard-
Modern 2-bdrm. apts. for Fall. Dish-
washer, balcony, air-cond., and much
more. Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867. 26Ctc
JULY-AUG. SUBLET-Modern furnish-
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(Also-available for fal). Call 769-
5903 after 5:00. 47C33
FEMALE TO SHARE 2-man apt. July-
Aug. 662-0711 after 6. 46C30
AVAIL. FOR SUMMEt & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825, liCtc
THOMAS PLAZA
914 S. STATE
1 Bdrm. 3-Man
features include:
Study Nook
Air Cond.
Laundry
Parking
761 -8055-769-4759
1Ctc
TRADEWI NDS
121 E. HOOVER
-1 Bdrm. 3-Man
-2 Bdrm. 4-Man
-Bilevel
-Garbage Disposal
-Central Air/cond.
-Laundry
-Parking
761-8055 or 761-9178
3Ctc

FOR RENT
1814 E, UNIVERSITY ,t.74-1 bdrm,
avail. June 16. $100. 769-7346, 48C33
RENT-July-Aug.: 3 bdrm., '1% bath,
pool, a/c, furn. Security dep. Rent
negoc. 1025 N. Maple. 665-5017, 44C29
BURNS PARK - 1 bdrm. for prof. or
faculty only,. all utilities phi. $165.
Call 668-6906. 45Ctc
IMMED. OCCUPANCY, 2 and 3 bdrm.
townhouses, $130-150 per month, in-
itial deposit.$390, children and pets
welcome, Arbor Park, located off
Ellsworth Rd., west of Platt. Man-
agement office 2990 S. State, 761-
9026. 20C35
MUSIC LOVER needed for one bdrm..
apt. now or in fall. $120. william St.
above Bike Shop. DbI. bed in back
room of new Community Record
Collection. Lots of music and people.
761-3690 or Anita at 761-0828. DC33
CAMPUS
NEW FURNISHED APARTMENT
FOR SUMMER OR FALL
at 543 CHURCH ST.
APT, 16
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600
38Ctc
1 Bdrm. Furn. Burns Park
Area for prof. or faculty only. All
utilities paid, $165. 668-6906. 13Ctc
PARKLANE
511 E. HOOVER
-Lg. 1 Bdrm.
-2-4 People
-Bilevel
-Air Cond.
-Dishwashers
-Parking
-Laundry
761 -8055 or 663-3809
2Ctc

FOR RENT
IMMED. OCCUPANCY, 2 bdrm. town-
houses, $139 per mo.,* initial deposit
$400, children and pets welcome, Arbor
Manor located on 2nd Ave., south of
Michigan Ave. near Monroe, in Ypsi.
Management office 2990 S. State, 761-
9026. 19035
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
(2 bdrm. unit-summer % term)
Campus area, cool, furnished apart-
ments. 1 and 2 bdrm.-ample park-
ing, contact Resident Manager, Apt.
102, 721 S. Forest St. 16Ctc
STRATFORD
629 S. FOREST
2-Bdrm. 4-Man
On Campus
Air Cond.
Parking
761-8055
50Ctc
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 68.5-8825
loCtc

FOR RENT
2-BEDROOM furnisheds, quiet, close to
campus, parking. Mgr. 101,202. July-
Aug. $150/mo.-Fall 4-man, $290. 927
S. Forest, after 5 p.m. 662-6156. C35
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY, 2-3 bdrm.
townhouses $126-154 per mo,, initial
deposit $360-420, children and pets
welcome. Danbury Green, located on
McArthur Blvd., north of Clark Road,
Ypsl, management office 299035.
State.-761-9026. 18035
911 S. Forest
Near Hill Street
Modern 2 Bdrm., 3-man
FURN. - FALL
668-6906
43Ctc
DYNAMITE MODERN 2-man apartment.
1 block from campus. July-Aug. Must
lease-$100/mo. Call 769-6246 after 6
p.m.- 49033
911 S. Forest
Near Hill St.-Modern 2 Bdrm., 3-man.
668-6906. Fall. 14Ctc
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
Fall Rentals
663-0511
761-5440
Featuring Forest Terrace, 1001 S. Forest,
Mgr. In Apt. No. 211. Park Terrace,
848 Tappan, Mgr. in Apt. No. 10.
Many other 1,a2 and 3 bdrm. apts.
available on campus. 38082
LOST AND FOUND

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Pakistan. I
brutality of
against the
Istanbul.

am thinking of the
the Moslem Turks
Christian Greeks in

The question of the Arab refu-
gees, who willingly left Palestine
in 1948 with the encouragement of
their leaders, is constantly being
brought up as a claim to modern
Israel. But my God, Israel is a
nation of refugees who have cre-
ated a garden out of a junk heap.
Let no one forget that more Jews
were kicked out of the Moslem
countries of the Middle East than
all the Arabs who left Palestine.
I guess the whole thingis really
this : If the Moslems and the Arabs
can lay claim to dozens of na-
tional homelands, why can't the
Hebrew people have just one,
preferably the one which they
have been struggling~ to keep for
2,000 years.
-George H. Brown, '70
June 8

Summit
Associates
1 AND 2 BEDROOMS
FOR FALL
-GARBAGE DISPOSALS
-AIR CONDI'TIONERS
-SOME DISHWASHERS
-LAUNDRY FACILITIES
-PARKING

F
E
T
-
P]
'
At
w

761 -8055

4Ctc

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-- - SALE ENDS SATURDAY, JUNE 20
THE FIFTH DIMENSION'S "GREATEST HITS"
ONLY $3.99 T1IS WEEK
INCLUDES: LET THE SUNSHINE IN / THE GIRLS SONG / STONED SOUL PICNIC /
WEDDING BELL BLUES / UP-UP AND AWAY / WORKING ON A GROOVEY THING

LOST-Brown and white female spring-
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"Meatball" -- we love her. 665-2169.
3A32
LOST-Beautiful blue-eyed kitten, tan
w/white chest and paws, June 12,
Geddes and Walnut. 761-3855. 4A34
FOUND - 2 rings on Stockwell tennis
court. Call 761-3887 after 6. DA32
FOUND--Tri-Delt pinkie ring on cen-
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LOST-Pregnant black and brown tor-
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neck, June 13 vic. Packard and Hill.
You really don't want all those kit-
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Silent Majority inside, protestors outside

By DEBRA THAL
Vice President Spiro Agnew, featured
speaker at a $100 per plate fund raising
dinner for the Republican party, the out-
spoken voice of the Silent Majority.
While more than 4,000 bejewelled mem-
bers of the wealthy Republican party wait
inside, while hundreds of anti-war and
anti-Agnew protesters demonstrate out-
side, the Vice President watches Huntley-
Brinkley. He later names the show "'Truth
or Consequences" or "Laugh-In."
Over their martinis and manhattans.
the invited guests at the dinner com-
pliment one another on new gowns or
wise business deals. Behind police lines,
the demonstrators ignore whether they
are dressed in jeans and long hair or a
business suit; they are together against
what Agnew represents.
The ruffles and flourishes of a bugle
and drum corps are heard as the color
guard approaches with the Vice President
in tow. He is surrounded by a crowd of
Secret Service men to protect him from
any danger or annoyance.
The official guests rise to their feet and
applaud for each service represented in
the honor guard as their song is played.
Outside, the uninvited guests chant,
"Ho, Ho, Ho Chi Minh,
Inside, the dinner progresses oblivious
to the dissent outside. Agnew and friends
enjoy their sumptuous sirloin steak din-
ner and Fat Bob sings, "I'm proud to be
an American."
As Earle Perkins' 12 piece band along
with vocalist Jeanie Darr plays for the

enjoyment of the Republicans, a mother
of four young girls shouts, "Millions are
dying," as a late-arriving couple leave
their Rolls Royce.
An old, old man with a full white beard
join the ranks of the peace demonstra-
tors. Fred the Poet explains his presence,
"I've lived more than 75 years. I'm still
looking for peace. They made me fight
in the First World War; they drafted me.
They tried to make me a professional
killer but they failed."
Poor Spiro cannot eat his dinner be-
cause all of the big shots want their
chance to put in a good word for their
special interest.
The co-chairmen of the event were Roy
Chapin, Lynn Townsend, James Roche,
and Henry Ford, the heads of the four
big car companies that own Detroit as
well as a lot of other places around the
world.
The protesters hold a brief rally. Sev-
eral young people speak of racism, im-
perialism and male chauvinism.
There are no blacks to be seen inside
of the dinner-except for two in the mili-
tary honor guard and, of course, many of
the waitresses.
The guests at the dinner are Detroit's
wealthiest citizens. They represent almost
every company that ever exploited a
small, underdeveloped nation or took over
an entire country for their own profits.
Those same people also represent the
companies that pay women less for the
same job and won't give them positions+
of responsibility because "You would just

go of and have children." Even the way
the elite relate to each other show dem-
onstrates their ideas on a woman's place."
Women were there for the same reason
as the flowers, because they look nice.
Even Mrs. Agnew was ignored.
However, just as there were two token
blacks on the military honor guard, there
was a token woman with a high position
in the party. Almost every speaker
throughout the evening remainded the
group how they must support Lenore
Romney, "She's our girl," in the race to
oust incumbent Democrat, half-way lib-
eral Sen. Philip Hart.
After boring introductions by Gov. Mil-
liken, House Minority Leader Gerald Ford
and Sen. Robert Griffin-all good Michi-
gan Republicans-Agnew spoke. Outside
of the usual boring anecdotes, all he said
was that he was for a "progressive par-
tisanship" in other words, or he would
tolerate "rational dissent."
Good for him. Maybe he will tolerate it.
He, along with everyone else at the din-
ner, completely ignored the demonstra-
tors. But the guests, if anything, were
worse than the Vice President.
As they left, protesters shouted anti-
war slogans and remonstrated them
for their attire and jewels from behind
police lines; the guests either completely
ignored them, asked the police (and there
were more of them than the protesters)
to "get those.niggers outa my way," or
berated the demonstrators-many very
respectable adults-for their irresponsi-
bility.

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f''r.
4
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OVER 25,000 LP'S, OVER 300 LABELS IN STOCK
WATCH FOR IN STORE
SPECIALS CHANGING
WEEKLY
discountreod

OS kt A SAY/Xf/
411;
i
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ilt
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11

Agnew defended the right to dissent "in
the tradition of Holmes and Brandeis."
One of the rules he laid down was, "Ev-
ery partisan has an obligation to present
his postion forcefully, factually, and fear-
lessly."
Does that mean that one is suppose to
talk with no one listening. Agnew can
voice such accommodating platitudes
from behind the protection of hordes of
Secret Service and hundreds of police
but how does he put it into practice?

1235 S. UNIVERSITY ! 300 S. STATE 0 ANN ARBOR
HOURS: MON.-FRI. 9:30-9, SAT. 9:30-6 0 SOUTH U. STORE SUNDAYS NOON-5

BORT CA
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HAN DE
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JUST RECEIVED NI
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2 STOR
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ALSO ON SALE THROUGH JUNE 20 -LIST --REG. -- SALE -
2. SAUAGEGRACE ... .. ....$4.98 $3.98 $3.32
2. WHO-LIVE AT LEEDS $5.98 $4.98 $3.99
3. BEATLES-LET IT BE . . . $6.98 $5.98 $4.99
4. PETER, PAUL & MARY'S GREATEST HITS $5.98 .$4.98 .. $3.98
5. JETHRO TULL-BENEFIT $4.98 . .. $3.98 .. .. $3.32

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