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June 13, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-13
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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, June 13, 1970

Saturday, June 13, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Low enlistments may increase draft calls

WASHINGTON ym) -- An unexpected
drop in Army enlistments last month
could herald trouble for Pentagon hopes
of cutting the draft to as low as 150,000
men this year.
The Army said enlistments in May to-
taled 7,629 - nearly 3,500 below the
month's objective.

listments this month and next-when the Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird
end of school traditionally brings more has said draft inductions this year hope-
volunteers-in hopes the situation rights fully will fall as low as 150,000 men, com-
itself. pared with nearly double that, 290,000. in
Any deficit in enlistments is made up 1969.
by increasing draft calls in future 1
months. Defense authorities are now saying the
The Pentagon Thursday announced a 1970 draft total probably will not drop

on the predicted track, draft calls could
go down significantly in the last five
months of 1970.
Quotas already announced for the first
seven months of the year total 114,500.
This leaves a balance of less than 36.000
to reach the 150.000 mark and nearly
66.000 if total inductions for the year
climb to 180,000.
This would work out to monthly draft
quotas as low as 7.000 plus from August
through December-unless voluntary en-
listments fail to recover their momentum.

Officials were unable to explain the July draft call of 15,000 young men for that low and the Pentagon has started
drop, except to note a sharp upturn in the Army. Sources said this call would hedging somewhat on Laird's forecast,
antiwrar demonstration during May as a-
result of the U.S. drive into Cambodia. have been lower were it not for the un- using an expected range of between 150,-
Defense officials indicated they will anticipated fall' off in last month's en- 000 and-180,000.

pay close attention to the trend in en- listments.

If the enlistment situation gets back

Anti-war conference
to Ie heldmin Cleveland
WASHINGTON (CPS) -- The first major anti-war conference
since the Cambodian invasion will take place in Cleveland next week-
end. June 19-21.
The conference comes at a time when tensions within the movement
are high, following a May 24 fistfight at a National Steering Com-
mittee meeting of the Student Mobilization Committee (SMC). The
fight was between members of Students for a Democratic Society and1
SMC.
Ann Arbor SMC is planning to send a contingent to next week-
endsconference and will provide transportation where possible to
Cleveland.
SDS, which is now the Progressive Labor Party (PLP) dominated1
faction, has long had fundamental differences with SMC over tacticsj
to be used in the antiwar movement. SDS rejects alliances with lib-
erals, while SMC believes in forging as broadly based a coalition as'
possible.
These differences have always been present, and have been aired
at past anti-war- conferences, but the bitterness between the twoj
groups is now more intense than ever. It is possible that both groups
will attempt to pack the Cleveland meeting, where every person at-
tending will be able to vote.
At the May 24 meeting, the first fight began when SDS member
Nat Goodman tried to enter the meeting. He was stopped by ushers,
who told him he had to register. Here the stories diverge, with both
groups blaming the other. SMC claims he refused, and tried to push
into the meeting, while SDS says he asked where he should register
and was jumped by four guards. The 12 other SDS members in the
meeting came back, and a fistfight ensued. SDS member Rita Hollum
claims she was kicked in the face, and SDS National Secretary John
Pennington says he was kicked in the head.
SDS withdrew to caucus, and came back after lunch with a total
of about 50 people. In the meantime, the SMC meeting had decided to
bar all but two delegates on the grounds that "We felt large numbers
of people from SDS would physically endanger the meeting," ac-
cording to Danny Rosenshine of the SMC.
The rest of the SDS-PLP delegation attempted to enter, and a
melee in which both sides claim injuries ensued. SDS withdrew, and
both sides settled down to denouncing the other.
The SMC meeting voted to call on SDS and PL members to
"repudiate the attack" and launched a campaign "against the use of
violence within the movement."
SDS also denounced violence within the movement, contending
it was they who were attacked, and stated the SMC leadership "has
consisently allied with the government and built the reputation of.
liberal politicians who smile sweetly while keeping the U.S. in Vietnam
and extolling the use of troops against black working people and
students."

'Interns'
begin D.C.
program
By ANITA WETTERSTROEM
Twenty-four University students
are enroute to Washington, D.C.
this week where they will work as
"interns" in offices of Congress-
men and government agencies.
Through the efforts of the Uni-
versity Placement Office, the stu-
dents were given jobs in 17 con- I
gressional offices-and' eight agen-
cies where they will work for eight
weeks.
Some of the interns will be do-
ing pollution investigation and re-
search for congressional reform,
Assistant Director of the Place-
ment Office William Audas said.:
The exact jobs the students will
be doing, in most cases has not
been defined, however.
"We asked the offices to make
the experience as educational as,
possible," Audas said, "although
some may end up licking stamps
some of the time."
The students will be living in
residence halls at George Wash-
ington University. Their housing
fees as well as a small stipend are
being provided by the University
Alumni Association which com-
pletely subsidized the program for
one year with a donation of $9,000.
The students will not be paid
by the offices 'in which they are
employed.
In Washington, the students
will take part in a Washington
Intern Seminar which will ar-
range for them to be given time
off from work to attend sessions of
Congress and committee meetings.
The University group hopes to!
hold evening seminars in their
residence halls, inviting speakers
from their various offices of em-
ployment to "address the entire
group.
"These students are interested
in getting a first hand look at
what goes on in Washington," Au-.
das said. "I think most of them
are trying to find out if they
might be interested in govern-
ment work as a career.!
The students were selected out#
of 200 applicants by a committeel
appointed by Vice-President Bar-
bara Newell. The students were
judged on the basis of interest,
academic excellence, and need.
Because this is the first group
from the University to take part
in a Washington intern program
Audas said the future of the pro-
gram will depend on their success.
Daily Official Bulletin
Day Calendar

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Graduation in Harlem

Harlem Preparatory School's moga logo dancers perform during graduation ceremonies in a New
Yorl City Street. The school reclaims high school dropouts and high school graduates with non-
academic diplomas to prepare them for college.
MINNESOTA CASE:
ROTC officer may face court
arta for a arm testimony

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MICHIGAN-
REPERTORY
"THIS COMPANY HAS DISTINGUISHED "EMP
ITSELF"-Michigan Daily PAI
shakespeare
THE MERCHANT OF VENICE
stei nbeck
OF MICE AND MEN
garson kanin (
BORN YESTERDAYr

HASIS ON ENSEMBLE
D OFF ROYALLY"-
In Repertory J
July 28-Augus-

peter nichols
JOE EGG

August 4-8
OFFICE

AVOID BOX

ORDER

TICKETS

N

The University Players' 2nd Exciting Summer Reperto

ALL PERFORMANCES IN THE AIR CONDITIONED LYDIA MENDELSSOHN

July 14-18
July 21-2s
July 28-Aug. 1
Aug. 4-8

Tuesday
J14 MER.
J21 MICE
J28 BORN
A4 EGG

Wednesday
J15 MICE
J22 MER.
J29 BORN
A5 EGG

Thursday Friday
JJ 6 MER. J17 MICE
J23 MICE J24 MER.
J30 BORN J31 BORN
A6 EGG A7 EGG

SEASON SUBSCRIBERS PLEASE NOTE: By ordering the same day for all four weel
cally see all four plays. When you have completed your order below check your
performance schedule and keep it for your own record.

MINNEAPOLIS (CPS) - An
ROTC officer doing graduate
work at the University of Min-
nesota was threatened with
court-martial f o r testifying
against ROTC at university
hearings on the future of mili-
tary training at the school.
Professor Frederick J. Adel-
man, head of the Department
of Aerospace Scineces, and an

Air Force officer, was censured
by the local chapter of the
the armed forces) of the Uni-
versity Professors (AAUP) for
making the threats.
Jerome F. Winzig, graduate
student in English and recently
commissioned Second Lieutenant
in the Air Force Reserve, was
called into Adelman's office
after testifying at the hearings.

.

-1 4

The future plan

~''landscape -makes
a treat for the feet
By NADINE COHODAS
It pays to be a pedestrian at the University these days with many
campus improvements designed to make walking easy, comfortable
and safe.
The newest improvements for legs of all ages is the walkway and
"plaza" connecting the Undergraduate and new Harlan Hatcher Grad-
uate Library.
Scheduled for final completion sometime in October, the area
includes an 18-foot wide walkway leading from South University
into the UGLI which branches to the left in front of the new library
and then swings around the west wall of the Clements Library and
back to South U.
Director of Plant Extension Jack Weidenbach says that the plaza
area, between the back of the Clements Library and the Hatcher
addition will include a "large lawn with trees scattered around."
"We just received bids Tuesday for the landscaping, but we
can't finish it till.fall because we'll have to wait to plant the trees."
Weidenbach explains. Some of the lawn may be put in later this
summer, however.
The soon-to-be-plazaed area has been a favorite parking spot for
nighttime studiers, but with the new arrangement, this will be im-
possible. Although the driveway leading to the UGLI is wide enough
to handle cars, Weidenbach says it will be used only for University
service vehicles.
Weidenbach admits there may have been some confusion about
the intent of the walkway because It looks like a driveway. But he
says the walkway is wide "because there is'a large volume of people
who use this area and we hope they'll use the sidewalk, not the grass."

Winzig had told the committee
that "if an ROTC officer were
really liberally educated, he'd
refuse to go into the service."
He added that ROTC is "anti-
thetical to education" because
"one cannot think and act on
his own opinions in the mili-
tary."
According to the AAUP report
on the incident, Adelman told
Winzig that hisdstatements
could be held to be court mar-
tial offenses under Article 133
(conduct unbecoming an officer
and a gentleman) and Article
134 (conduct to the prejudice of
good order and discipline in the
armed forces or conduct of a
nature to bring discredit upon
American Association of Uni-
versal Code- of Military Justice.
Adelman told Winzig that no
action will be taken now, but
that newspaper accounts of his
testimony will be kept on file
with memorandum of their con-
versation, to be destroyed after
a year if Winzig made no similar
statements in that period.
rf Winzig insists on speaking
after being warned, however,
delman said his comments will
be recorded and forwarded to
"proper military authorities" for
consideration of possible action.
Adelman was censured for "un-
professional conduct in his capac-
ity as a professor at this univer-
sity" by the AAUP.
The Michigan :Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
.gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sundaymorning Univer-
sity year. Subscription. rates: $10. by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mall,

Season Subscriptions:
Individual Tickets:

REGULAR: (Tues., Wed., Thurs.)--$6.50, $5.00
WEEKEND (Fri.-Sat.)--$8.50, $7.00
MIXED: (weekdays and weekends mixed)-add
50c for each Friday-or Saturday ticket
ordered to regular price above.
TUES., WED., THURS.-$2.00, $1.50
FRI., SAT.-$2.50, $2.00

TICKET INFORMATION
PRICES: (SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS OFFER SAVINGS AND PREFERRED LOCATIONS)

Saturday, June 13
Cinema' Guild: Kenneth Tobey and
James Arness in "The Thing" an dj
"Bad Boy" (short): Architecture Aud.,
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
Sunday, June 14
International Center Film Series
"Cosmopolis" (Congestion, pollution,
traffic; the multiple ills of urban liv-
ing; what urban planners and archi-
tects are doing; what we can expect the
big city to be like in the year 2000),
International Center, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, June 15
Senate Assembly mtg.: Assembly Hall,
Rackham, 3:15 p.m.
Plaeniitm wIService
General Divisionr
320S S.A.B.
Saturday, June 13
CURRENT OPENINGS MOSTLY IN S.E.
MICH. AREA, OTHERS NATIONWIDE:
Department of HEW, Soc. Security.
Admin., Ohio and Mich. openings for
new BA as Claims Representatives.
Mt. Pleasant State Home and Trang.;
School, Med. Lab Supv., BA in Med.i
Tech or bacteriol, or chem/zool w/1 yr.
mued. lab work.
Detroit Civil Service, Sanitary Chem-j
1st, and Sr. Psychiatric Soc. Worker.
IBM Corp., Detroit area customer re-
lations and computer applications rep-S
resentatives to the distribution indus-
tries, BA/MA pref. in math/engrg. area,
1 yr. training prog. new grads welcome.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 S.A.B.
Lower Level
City of Birmingham, Mich. Personnel j
Technician, Jr. or above in areas such
as Pers. Mgmt., Publ. Admin., Poll.Sci.,,
Bus. Ad.

Note: The higher priced tickets are the first 17 rows of orchestra and first 4 ,ows of balcc
The Box Office will open June 22. From June 22 until July 10 it will be op'n 12:30-5:00,
to August 8 it will be open 12:30-8:00 on performance days. Mail orders will be filled pr
Box Office. Phone 668-6300.
---- ----------------- -------------------------------- ----------------
Season Subscr
NAME Individual Tic
ADDRESS- PREFER: Orch
I Please CITY _-STATE Bak
I Print
PHONE _ _ ZIP Are you on ot
Mail orders to: UNIVERSITY PLAYERS st
I DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH Faculty
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN[ac Arb
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48104E] Ann Arbo
Play Performance (day and date) No: Price I C
MERCHANTj
MICE
-i--
BORNa
JOE EGG
TOTAL (Season price or individual tickets) _ (for mixed season add 50
Sat. to regular season)
CHECK ONE: I enclose stomped, self-addressed envelope. Please mail my tickets July 6.
I 1I enclose no envelope. Hold my tickets at the box office.
I will pick them up. (See box office hours above)
-.--. _- - . - . - . -..-.....- -.---- ...-....------ ..- ..,..- -.

'a

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