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June 11, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-06-11
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420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.

Hoffman is really that bad

Thursday, June 11, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JUNE 11, 1970

} Nears Phone: 754-0552

The city will pay for
defeating school funding
WITH AN AVERAGE family income close to $19,000 per
year, Ann Arbor is a relatively wealthy city but you'd
never know it to look at the vote on Monday's school bond
and millage proposals.
While nearly 20 per cent of the cities youth contin-
ues to drop out of overcrowded classrooms, worried tax-
payers headed for the polls to decisively defeat five bond
issues and two millage requests that would have raised
over $42 million in badly needed school aid. Had all of the
proposals passed, the burden on the average Ann Arbor
homeowner would have been around $8.10 per month.
A major reason cited for the defeat is parental dis-
content with the way the schools are being run. More
specifically, extreme displeasure over the supposed lax
enforcement of disciplinary rules. However, the tight-
wad nature of the electorate in a time of mild recession,
cannot be overlooked.
WHATEVER THE REASONS, the defeat will be felt in
the classrooms long before the social costs of infer-
ior education affect the taxpayers. By 1973, the city's two
high schools may be forced to operate on split shifts be-
cause the voters refused to authorize the construction of
a new high school.
Funds for the construction of two new badly needed
elementary schools and a new junior high school, as well
as renovation of the more dilapidated school buildings,
must also be postponed until the voters get a n o t h e r
chance to defeat bond issues, as Monday's overwhelming
expression of sentiment indicates they will.
THE TWO MILLAGE REQUESTS - that would have
taken $4.10 from the average monthly family budget -
were also resoundingly defeated.
One of the millage proposals would have provided $5
million for the construction and operation of a vocational
education facility and might have helped raise Michigan,
with one of the country's worst programs, from its rank-
ing of forty third among the 50 states in appropriations
for vocational training.
For those who must cope with a job market where
skills are becoming rapidly obsolete, the lack of an ad-
vanced technical training center is bad news indeed. By
1975, the center was expected to enroll up to 900 high
school students, graduates, dropouts and adults, and
might have gone a long way toward providing economic
security for a neglected portion of our population.
As one losing school board candidate who campaign-
ed in favor of the vocational center put it, "This city
doesn't give a damn about the 30 to 40 per cent of the
kids who don't go to college."
The defeat of the 3.10 millage proposal for the Ann
Arbor school system will mean up to a 100 position re-
duction in staff, despite an anticipated increase of 900
students.
THE CITY'S VOTERS also apparently don't give a damn
about funding extensive programs to prevent students
from failing or dropping out, as that millage went down
to defeat by a three to two vote.
Noting that the average Ann Arbor family spends
well over twice as much on recreation as it does on edu-
cation, School Superintendent W. Scott Westerman sug-
gested that the returns might be a source of some disil-
lusionment for youths who would like to see some sort of
sensible reordering of priorities. Other school officials
concerned with disciplinary problems have added that
taxpayers should expect no miracles in next years over-
crowded classrooms.
Whether the city's taxpayers like it or not, those who
may someday face uieniployment due to their inferior
education will come back to taxpayer for support. The
cost of the electorates' decision - unless corrected - will
more than make up for the taxes saved by the voters
Monday.
-HARVARD VALLANCE
Summer Editoral Staff
ALEXA CANADY ........................................... Co-Editor
MARTIN HIRSCHMAN...................Co-Editor
SHARON WEINER .A ..........Summer Supplement-Editor
SARA KRULwICH............................ . .....Photo Editor
NIGHT EDITORS: Rob Bier. Nadine Cohodas, Robert Kraftowitz, Anita
wetterstroem.
ASSISTANT fIGHT EDITORS: Lindsay Chaney, Hester Pulling. Carla
Rapoport, Debra Thal, Harvard valance.

By DEBRA THAL
A huge skyscraper of plate glass
and steel. Police every ten feet,
inside and outside. A public build-
ing, closed to the public. One open
door out of eight, but all of them
guarded by a congregation of ten
to twenty police men. Chicago's
Federal Building, seat I of justice
for the Northern District of Il-
linois.
The occasion for the Chicago
police stationed in and around the
building was another small rally
demanding freedom for Bbby
Seale and all political prisoners.
Normally, only U.S. Marshall's
security guards, by the dozen,
patrol the building. A small sign
on each door reminds passers by
that only those with official busi-
ness will be allowed in.
Since I was at the Federal Build-
ing anyway, and not quite believ-
ing that Judge Hoffman could be
as bad as everyone says, I decided
to visit his court room. Because
I had official business and a press
card, I was allowed inside the
sacred temple.
Confronted constantly by uni-
formed U.S. Marshalls and Chica-
go police, I made my way to the
third bank of elevators. At the
stops on the way up, I noted the
austere similarity of each floor.
Very tight security, with only
heavy metal doors breaking the
monotomy of the plaster.
Each person would stare curious-
ly at me and ask me where I was
going as though a young person
was some kind of freak.
Finally, one of the superspeed,
silently efficient elevators let me
out at the 23rd floor.
THE 23RD FLOOR of the Fed-
eral Bldg. in Chicago. Infamous
for its connection with the in-
justice of the Chicago conspiracy
trial. I walked into the Federal
Court for the Northern District of
Illinois. Better known as the home
of Judge Julius Hoffman.
It looked like the other court-
rooms in the building-fine wood
and black leather, gray haired
men in expensive looking business
suits speaking in hushed, almost
revent tones, a jury of very es-
tablishment appearing, upright,
silent Majority Americans, a whole
crew of elderly clerks, bailiffs, and
guards-but presiding over the en-
tire nightmare was, a senile old
man who looked like Mr. Magoo,
Judge Hoffman.
IT SEEMED impossible that
anyone could possibly be as bad
as the news media has portrayed
Hoffman. It is still difficult to be-
lieve that a man like Hoffman
could have the power of the fed-
eral government behind him. But
everything that has been said
about him is true. And a lot more.
It's not just that Hoffinan does
things considered wrong. There
are many people in very high posi-
tions in this country like that.
Hoffman is more-much more. Al-
though, as one lawyer told me,
Hoffman has a brilliant mind, he
enforces each small legal point
only for the prosecution and
against the defense. He knows
enough petty points so that he
can always use or ignore them to
do exactly what he wants. And he
likes to convict.
A capricious man, Hoffman
overrules motions and objections
willfully, with a wave of his
knarled hand. His small quavering
voice insists he will put up with
no nonsense.

In one case, there were two de-
fense attorneys representing dif-
ferent clients. When the prose-
cutor presented a photograph as
a proposed state's exhibit. The
first defense attorney objected
saying the photograph was im-
material. The second said he had
no comment. Hoffman then asked
the first if he still objected even
though the other defense attorney
had not. He replied "Yes, until
materiality has been established."
Hoffman asked the same question
again, with the same affirmative
answer.
Hoffman then replied, "Since
I've asked you twice and both
times you refused to answer my

question, I therefore overrule your
objection whatever it is."t
The only time Hoffman ever
looked anyhing but bored or pain-
ed was when a "young lawyer from
our law school whom I recommend
highly to your honor" was in-
troduced by a senior defense at-
torney.
As I left thecoppressive atmos-
phere of the courtroom and the
Federal Bldg., I noticed that I was
only representative of the rest of
Chicago, the unsubtle police on
every block. Julius Hoffman has
become the infamous laughing
stock of the world. Maybe people
should take a closer look at Chi-
cago and what he represents.

A letter to Fleming,
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a copy of a letter sent to President Fleming
from Student Government Council and the Gay Liberation Front.)
IF THE UNIVERSITY is to be more than an extension of societal
repression toward homosexuals, then the University must top bowing
to the sick threat of bad publicity, and begin to defend, not suppress,
the rights of homosexuals.
We call upon you to reverse your decision and allow Gay Libera-
tion Front (GLF) to hold their conference. The University should be
a place that would encourage a conference concerned about the prob-
lems of the homosexuals and would seek to improvce the self-concept
of homosexuals and theirarelationships with each other and with the
community-at-large. The GLF is a recognized student organization and
deserving of the same rights and privileges of all other student organ-
izations.,Student Government Council has proposed a resolution, which
is enclosed, which demands that you, President Fleming, stop using the
University as an instrument of repression and recognize the rights
of the GLF to hold their conference.
IN YOUR LETTER of April 20, you raise the objection that "the
Michigan Penal Code contains strict provisions on the subject of homo-
sexuality." This is untrue. There is nothing that prohibits the con-
dition of homosexuality and several states courts have ruled on the
rights of homosexuals to meet. In late 1967, the New Jersey Supreme
Court ruled that homosexuals "have the undoubted right to congregate
in public as long as their behavior conforms with currently acceptable
standards of decency and morality." Also, the New York State Court
of Appeals held in 1968 that it is discriminatory and unlawful to
forbid homosexuals to assemble in public places. Specifically. Mr. Flem-
ing, what would be illegal about the proposed conference as presented
to you in the letter from GLF, April, 1970?
Further, you state in your letter that "any conference on homo-
sexuality ought in view of the law, to be clearly educational in nature
and directed primarily towards those people who have a professional
interest in the field." Is not the proposed conference "which would
offer workshops on homosexuality to homosexuals from the Midwest,
especially members of Gay Liberation Groups, and public lectures and
panel discussions by such outside specialists as jurist, doctors, and
religious leaders who would speak to homosexuals and the public-at-
large on legal, medical and religious aspects of homosexuality," essen-
tially educational in nature? Homosexuals are no longer interested in
being treated as subjects and being exploited by psychologists and psy-
chiatrists, but need to more fully define and improve their self-concept
by interaction with one another.
IN YOUR BRIEF MEETING with GLF the end of April, you stated
the conference could not be held because of possible adverse public
reaction and because it would be regional in nature. Yet you have al-.
lowed the GLF to hold a dance in the Michigan Union which clearly
is not an educational, nor a professional event. Other recognized stu-
dent organizations have the right to hold such regional conferences;
this cannot be denied to the GLF just because some in the community
object. Again, the University must defend, not suppress, the rights of
Gay Liberation Front. The proposeddconference is for the development
of self determination of the homosexual, and is not a social event nor
should GLF be viewed as a social club.
Finally, if one is to be selective in allowing conferences on campus,
then why not begin by eliminating such conferences as "Topics in Mili-
tary Operations" which included discussion of weapon capabilities, sys-
ten effectiveness and logistics and costs." Another 1969 conference
provided engineers, managers and decision-makers with background in
the concepts, procedures, assumptions and effectiveness of quantitative
approaches to planning for the next-generation weapons. Where are
the priorities of this University, people or weapons?
President Fleming, we call upon you to immediately reverse your
decision and allow te GLF to hold their conference to be held sometime
this fall. If you believe another meeting between you and the GLF and
SGC would be helpful, then we agree to meet with you as soon as
possible.+

FOR RENT

Daily Classlieus

FOR RENT

The Ann Arbor Fair Housing Ordi-
nance and the University of Mich-
igan Regents' bylaws prohibit dis-
crimination in housing. Questions
should be directed to Off-Campus
Housing, 764-7400.
Additional Classifieds on Page 6
ROOM FOR RENT. 662-5456, 769-3908.
15C27
STUDIO ROOM FOR MAN FOR FALL-
Private entrance and lavatory. Nice
SE location. Call 663-8244 after 5
p.m. or weekends. CX
AVAIL. NOW-3-bdrm. ranch, unfurn.,
garage, basement, $285. 663-3842. 12C28
SPACIOUS SUITE for 1 or 2 men, pri-
vate entr., refrig. 662-3481. C32
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
(2 bdrm. unit-summer i term)
Campus area, cool, furnished apart-
ments. 1 and 2 bdrm.--ample park-
ing, contact Resident Manager, Apt.
102, 721 S. Forest St. 16Ctc
DOUBLE SIZE TOWNHOUSE, walk
downtown from lovely two bdrm. for
family. Many extra rms. . , photo-
graphic dkrm., family rm. w/fireplace,
lg. study. All appliances and dish-
washer. $275 pays-central ac, heat,
water. 761-4008. 725 W. Huron. Avail.
now. 37Ctc
STRATFORD
629 S. FOREST
2-Bdrm. 4-Man
On Campus
Air Cond.
Parking
761 -8055
50Ctc
AVAIL. FOR SUMMERt & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fr., 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat, or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. 11Ctc
FALL RENTAL - 4 man apt. in old
house, 2 bedrooms, large kitchen, full
basement, porch, no utilities, girls
only, near hospitals. $250/mo. Call
769-1124 persistently. 17C28

FOR RENT
NEED ONE GIRL to complete lovely 4-
man apartment on Thayer across the
street from Frieze Bldg. $65/month.
Call Carla at 769-0937, 764-0553. DC27
PARKLAN E
511 E. HOOVER
-Lg. 1 Bdrm.
-2-4 People
-Bilevel
-Air Cond.
-Dishwashers
-Parking
-Laundry
761 -8055 or 663-3809
2Ctc

THOMAS PLAZA
914 S: STATE
1 Bdrm. 3-Man
Study Nook,
Air Cond.
Laundry
Parking
761 -8055--769-4759

I

TRADEWI NDS
121 E. HOOVER
--1 Bdrm. 3-Man
-2 Bdrm. 4-Man
-Bilevel
-Garbage Disposal
-Central Air/cond.
-Laundry
-Parking
761-8055 or 761-9178
3Ctc
CAMPUS
NEW FURNISHED APARTMENT
FOR SUMMER OR FALL
at 543 CHURCH ST.
APT. 16
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHUROH ST.
761-7600
380tco
Summit
Associates
1 AND 2 BEDROOMS
FOR FALL
-GARBAGE DISPOSALS
-AIR CONDITIONERS
-SOME DISHWASHERS
-LAUNDRY FACILITIES
-PARKING
761-8055
4Ctc
2-BEDROOM furnished, quiet, close to
campus, parking. Mgr. 101-202. July-
Aug. $150/mo.-Fail 4-man, $290. 927
S. Forest, after 5 p.m. 662-6156. C35
Fall RentaIs
663-0511
761-5440
Featuring Forest Terrace, 1001 S. Forest,
Mgr. in Apt. No. 211. Park Terrace,
848 Tappan, Mgr. in Apt. No. 10.
Many other 1, 2 and 3 bdrm. apts.
available on campus. 38C82

lCtc

711 ARCH
near State and Packard
Modern 2-bdrm. apts. for Fall

,0
"

features include:
dishwasher
balcony
air-cond.
and much more

2f

I
26Ctc

FOR RENT
SUMMER AND FALL, off and on cami-
pus. 761-7764. C28
PHI ALPHA KAPPA, located one block
from the central campus, has rooms
for the summer and offers room and
board for the fall. For further infor-
mation contact, Ronald Dirkse, 1010
E. Ann, Ann Arbor. Phone 761-5491.
7CRF
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fal semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665-8825
lOCte
SUMMER SUBLET
ROOM FOR GIRL - Excellent campus
location with kitchen privileges,
available June 15 to Sept. 736 S.
State, No. 2 (no phone). 21U28
SUBLET-1 GIRL needed to complete
4 man in old house, near hospitals,
for July-Aug. $40/mo. or neg. Call
769-1124 persistently. 22U28
GIRL TO complete 4-man for summer
term. Lots of windows. $30-35/mo.
Call 662-7032 eves. 520 Packard,3No.
21. 23U29
SINGLE APT. $80. July-Aug. 769-2472
evenings. 24U29
HUGE SINGLE (or double) in beauti-
ful 3 bdrm. apt. across from Markley
Hall near graveyard and Arb. Big liv-
ing rm., dining rm., kitchen, etc.
$50/mo. Call Harvard anytime at the
Daily, 764-0552. DU32
SPACIOUS SINGLE room in cool, old
house for July and August; $40; util-
ities paid; 11,x2 blocks from SAB on
South Division. Call 761-8137 or The
Daily, 764-0552 and leave a message
for Anita. DU30
BEAUTIFUL APT., air cond., 3 lrg.
rms., completely furnished with art
and everything. 2 blks. from campus.
$150 until Sept. 1. Call 662-6288 or
761-7208. 3U26
SUBLET FURN. EFF. July-Aug. CHEAP.
Phone 761-6885. 17U28
FEMALE WANTED for large 2-man
apt. Excellent location, inexpensive
for July-Aug. Call 663-5993. 18U28
ONE BDRM. in house. June 21-Aug.,
guy/girl. 662-4049. 19U28
ROOM FOR RENT. Spacious, great lo-
cation, cooking facilities. Rent negot.
I MUST move, summer term. Call
Russ, 761-4089. 49U24
MODERN 2-man air-cond. apt. Avail-
able now thru August. Call 663-2718.
13U26
JULY-AUG. SUBLET. Solid, furn. 11
rm. eff., free parking. Rent negoti-
able. Write or visit 630 Packard. Apt.
4. DU28
SUBLET--Available July 1st-Efficiency
apt., suitable for 1 or 2. Small but
comfortable and cheap. 906 Packard.
665-2125. 14U28

S
T;
2
3E
C
2
H

Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867

1 GIRL over 21 for luxurious apt. 761-
1584 eves. 10C27
FOR RENT-Bedroom in large house,
male or female, June 20-Aug. 30. Neg.
Roz. 662-4049. DC26
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
4CtCU

i

47Ctc available on campus. 38C82

I

K \//7-
r.ne,

I

II

I

SUBLET T 1 y 1-A u .1- Modern air-
Icondi. 1 BDRM. 2 blks. from campus.
761-4003 or 764-7487. 15U26
1346 GEDDES, Near Observatory-Rooms
Sformen. Cooking. $45/mo. Call 668-
6906. 12U tc

FRIDAY-SATURDAY-SUNDAY-June 12-13-14

505 W. Cross St.
YPSILANTI
483-8071
C O T Y T
EAt ,N

COME IN TODAY !
"Sample the most delicious
Mexican foods"
Grand Opening Special!
TACO$ . .. 3 for $1
eg. 39c each
! Fish & Chips
* Shrimp Dinners
" Enchiladas
" Tamales
S$ HOURS:
Mon. thru Thurs.
1 1 A.M.-1 1 P.M.
Fri. & Sat.
til Midnight
Sun.
1 P.M.-8 P.M.

SALE
'Women's Pei
i'-" * . 7
This includes all styles <
Black brown or light co,

Letters to the Editor

Im

Tarrant
To the Editor:
IT IS PLEASING to note that
Mr. Tarrant, formerly on the Uni-
versity of Michigan staff, has re-
leased himself from contempt of
court proceedings by furnishing
law enforcement with the name of'
the fourth man of a quartet who
mauled two University students
the preceding semester.
I also feel that another group
oK men - three men already in
prison - who, with a fourth not
yet named, criminally attacked a

school teacher in Ypsilanti a few
years back by running into her
car on purpose so she'd inspect
the damage which then gave them
their opportunity to r a p e her,
ought to be put into solitary con-
finement cells until they give law
enforcement the name of t h a t
fourth un-named man still at
large. Even worse, that same four-
man gang captured and raped a
University co-ed.
You'd think Ann Arbor law en-
forcement would be careful to not
forget such terrible crimes.
-Lewis C. Ernst

Letters to the Editor should
be mailed to the ;Editorial Di-
rector or, delivered to- Mary
Rafferty in the Student Pub-
lications business office in the
Michigan Daily building. Let-
ters should be typed, double-
spaced and normally should not
exceed 250 words. The Editorial
Directors reserve the right to
edit all letters submitted.

1' FREE
Soft Drink
upon presentation of
this coupon

w

YOUR CHOICE
$13.00

is is for a (int,
NO EX(IHANGES-
7VAN BOVI

NIGHT EDITOR: ROBERT KRAFTOWITZ

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