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June 11, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-11
Note:
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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, June 11, 1970

Thursday, June 11, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CLAIMS $6 MILLION:

'tJ' Pct)nt)m.l*.Nts spw

FatIer of Kent State victim sues l i
Aong recess1onto 70

CEASE-FIRE BROKEN:
U.S. aide slain hostages taken
as fighting continues in Jordan:

itio gov., i'Nationai Guardsmen

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-Associated Press
The 'Kill Cong' badge hangs from a uniform

for soldiers who do
DETROIT WP) - Specially designed "Kill Cong" badges were
awarded by a U.S. Army battalion to soldiers who could prove they
killed a Viet Cong last year, according to statements by servicemen
who have returned from Indochina.
"One way to prove your claim to a badge was to bring back an
enemy ear," says former Sgt. Frank Shepard, 23, of Plymouth, Mich.
"The badges turned my stomach," he said. "It was like we were
on a hunting trip or something."
The badge was awarded by the 5th Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th
Infantry Division while it was stationed at Rach Kien, South Vietnam,
_during the summer of 1969, Shep-
ard said.
Study says auto when Sen. Philip Hart (D-
1 71Mich) inquired about the badges
to the Defense Department, the
j department replied by letter dated
Dec. 18, 1969, that "information
received from headquarters 2nd
to c ntin e !Field Force, Vietnam, indicates
that the Sat Cong badge was a
Detroit-area auto factories will program recently instituted in the
probably not call back many laid- 5th Battalion, 60th Infantry."
off men or hire new workers in The letter, signed by Col. C. T.
the next few mronths, according to Benedict, chief of the Personnel
a University survey. Services Division, said that "the
The survey found it is unlikely badges and emblems have been re-
that auto sales will increase in the moved from uniforms and action
near future, citing statistics which has been taken to prevent any
show that the proportion of Amer- similar occurrences in the future."
ican families intending to buy al Shepard said the order whicht

CLEVELAND, Ohio I,---The
father of one of the four Kent
State University students kill-
ed in a confrontation with Na-
tional Guardsmen filed a $6
million wrongful death suit
yesterday against the gover-
nor of Ohio and N a t i o n a l
Guard officials,
Arthur Krause, father of 19-
year-old Allison Krause of Pitts-
burgh, Pa., filed the suit in U.S.
District Court here against Gov.
James A. Rhodes, Ohio Adj. Gen.
Sylvester T. Del Corso and Brig.
Gen. Robert H. Canterbury, head
of Ohio guard units.
The suit charged that the de-
fendants ordered the National
Guard to the campus and in so
doing "intentionally and malici-
ously disregarded the lives and
safety of students, spectators and
passersby i n c l u d i n g Allison
Krause."
The suit also contended that
the three defendants knew there
was no cause, or insufficient
cause, for sending "armed troops"
equipped with guns and live am-
munition.
Krause also asserted that the
three knew the troops were not
properly trained in using loaded
weapons in the presence of civil-
ians who were not similarly
armed.
The suit asked for $1 million
compensatory and $5 million pun-
itive damages, claiming wrongful
death and violation of Miss
Krause's constitutional rights.
Although National Guard offi-
cials had originally said that the
shootings occurred only after a
sniper had fired shots at the
Guardsmen, the head of a federal
probe Tuesday said there was no
evidence to substantiate the
stories.
"At this time we do not have
sufficient evidence to support the
presence of a sniper at Jackson'
State or at Kent State . . .," said
Asst. Atty. Gen. Jerris Leonard.
Student Book Service
NOW OPEN j
EVENINGS
7:00-10:30
many nice books
1215 S. UNIVERSITY
761-0700E
Open daytime beginning
June 22ndj

Two University economists
report there are indications the
1970 recession will be the longest
since World War II and that "a
turning point cannot be expect-
ed earlier than the end of the
year.",
The economists, George Ka-
tend and Jay Schneideskamp,
say a national study conducted
by the Survey Research Center
also indicates a turnaround will
not occur "until consumers re-
ceive good news."
"No doubt," they say, ."there
is a recession in the consumer
sector at present," but they add
tht "it is a mild rather than a
sharp one."

While reporting that "people
see no sign of a slowdown in in-
flation," they say that "in view
of rising income, most people
say that inflation hurts them
only a little less than 25 per cent
that it hurts them much or very
much."
"On the other hand," the re-
port cautioned, "the extent of
consumer apprehension should
not be underestimated. The de-
teriation in buying sentiment
has continued already for 15
months, and present readings
show that it has slowed rather
than ended."

A U.S. army attache was slain treatewlut Mat teireii
yesterday and 18 Americans and j "depends upon the attitude of .the
a score of other foreigners were reactionary regime in Jordan."
being held hostage as the civil The Defense Department in
war in Jordan was rapidly esca- Washington identified the slain
la ting. Army attache as Maj. Robert P.
Arab guerrillas and Jordanian Perry. 34, of Chicago. Pentagon
troops battled through the streets officials said he was slain in his
of Amman last night. In an Am- home by guerrillas as his wife and'
man hotel the hostages were be- two of their three children looked
ing guarded by the Palestinian in- on.
surgents. The hostages were taken King Hussein warned in an im-,
in an effort to halt what the passioned radio address that his'
guerrillas called Jordanian army pro-Western country was in dan-'
attacks on refugee camps. ger of "destruction and annihila-
A spokesman for a small Marx- tion" unless the fighting ceased.
ist guerrilla group said that the Heavy fighting between Jordan-
hostages were being held "to dra- ian troops and Palestinian guer-
matize the plight and suffering of rillas broke out early Tuesday,
the Palestinian people." He added morning.

By The Associated Press

i

1

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that the hostages were being
tw~a Cal -ll ilt h~tthar Q f fv

Al Fatah, the largest of the
guerrilla groups. said 400 guerril-
las and civilians had been killed
! in two days of savagy' lighting in
the Amman ar'ea.
Government sources confirmed
that over 100 had died in the
fighting.
Guerrillas services claimed that
the fighting began after Jordanian
army units opened fire on a refu-
gee camp and a commando head-
quarters in Amman.
Other sources indicated that
the fighting broke out after troops
opened fire on a band of guerrillas
from the Marxist popular front.
A cease-fire agreement an-
nounced Tuesday between govern-
ment and guerrilla officials col-
lapsed and fighting was reported
continuing in every sector of the
capital city. Guerrillas fortified
several of Amman's many hills
and battled Jordanian tanks with
Soviet anti-tank rockets.
The Cairo-based radio of A]
Fatah also called on Syrian and
j Iraqi forces already in Jordan to
"protect the revolution and head}
off American intervention." }
It claimed that Crown Prince
Hassan was trying to overthrow
heth as king and had sought
hepfrom the U.S. 6th Fleet in the r

OBSERVERS WANTED
for
Color Vision Experiments,
You must be Red-Green Color Blind
2-6 hours per week
Rates: $1.75 per hr.
CALL: S. MiIler-764-0574
or walk in-5080 Kresge II
University of Michigan Medical Center
Ann at Forest

Repport on
President Nixon talks with Gov.
meets at the White House with a
to Cambodia for a first-hand la
Today, below).
bythe
by The Associated Press

Mediterranean.
Al Fatah also said some Jor-
danian units had turned against
their commanders and joined the
guerrillas.
Travelers from Amman reported
widespread shooting and heavy
shelling throughout the capital.

KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR

"1
!'
ti

NO WAITING
8 BARBERS
OPEN 6 DAYS

Arborland--Campus
Maple Villoge
The Dascola Barbers

U

______

i i

J 4or

AYAE
V4

HELD
OVER!!

SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:00
5:00-7:00
9:05 P.M.

A MAJORITY of the house
dent Nixon yesterday to sell Isra
wants to buy.
The request was made in a let
members, including the top Democr
are presently 431 members in the H
"It is clear that the moment
to take firm action to meet the prf
ment of the Soviet Union militar3
letter said.
THE UNITED STATES will
base in Africa today.
With the lowering of the Amer
Base in Libya comes under the fu
Command Council which took ove
governing monarch, King Idris, on
A PRESIDENTIAL fact-find
yesterday issued a report which
operation in Cambodia was meeti
The report, approved by the g
said the U.S. involvement "in a w
templated or expected by any of
leaders we consulted on this trip."
However, Sen. Thomas Mclnt
said that "despite our hopes that ti
limited tactical sort, I am deepil
expanded.
PRES
the CARNA
doors open 8 p.m.
330 Maynard

-t

Read and Use Daily Classifieds'

car during the next 12 months wasi
20 per cent lower in April and in,
May this year than in the same'
period last year.1

created the badges was signedI
June 28, 1969, by Capt. Philip F.
Kearns, infantry adjutant for the
battalion.

I

SHOPPING CAN BE FUN

cm

rw- ew r~~rsnn +C'

Gay

Liberation

E
R

TONIGHT !-Important General Meeting

UNION

3rd Floor
8:30 P.M.

r

kT JACOBSON'S
VEN WHEN YOU
IDE A BICYCLE
YOU CAN PARK YOUR BICYCLE AT OUR DOOR

i

Eves
6:25, 9:05

- M,

"'AIRPORT' is a
A ROSS HUN
BURT LANCAS
JEAN SEBER- JACQUI
I ELEN HAYES -VAN HI
3ARRY NELSON-LLOYD
DANA WYNTER - BARBA
Mon. -Thurs
$2.25
~~Mo~eeMatinees Man&

How close con you get? For your convenience there are
sheltered bike stands at our Moynard street entrance
for unlimited porking. Sure beats walking.

Rated R S1, M In
"ANCALLEDORSE"*'*

uiner served until 2a. (closed Mondays)'.211 N. Main-663-7752
(right accros from the old Post Office)

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