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June 10, 1970 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-10
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Wednesday, June 10, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, June 10, 1970

Federal rules released on working women

EXPERT SAYS:
'Nation's colleges should help homc

WASHINGTON OP) -- The D~e-
partment of Labor yesterday is-
sued guidelines to prohibit dis-
crimination against women on
federal government contract work.
Meanwhile, the American Asso-
ciation of University W o m e n
(AAUW) released a study of atti-
tudes among college educated men
and women toward women and
discrimination.
The guidelines pertain to wages,
hours, advertising in newspaper
columns, seniority, job classifica-
tions and retirement benefits.
The document calls on employ-
ers under such contracts to take
"affirmative action to recruit
women" for jobs where they have
previously been excluded - and
that includes management and
management-training programs.
Elizabeth Duncan Koontz, direc-
tor of the Labor Department's
Women's Bureau, announced the
guidelines, which were more scores
of recommendations made by a
presidential task force on women's
rights and responsibilities, released
by the White House today after
almost six months after it was
submitted.
The AAUW study said among a
group with a high education level,
84 per cent of the women and 77
per cent of the men say women
experience discrimination in the
working world.
In the same group, 43 per cent
of the women and 60 per cent of
the men say a woman's first re-
sponsibility is to be a feminine
companion of men and a mother.
The association of university
women said its opinion survey was
made among a group having a
higher level of education, income
and age than the general popula-
tion and does not reflect national
attitudes.

But it does reflect a key group
that is involved in changing at-
titudes, Dr. Shirley McCune,
AAUW associate director, told a
news conference.
McCune noted that one-fourth
of the female sample reported ob-
serving discrimination a g a i n s t
females.
The analysis of the opinonnaire
shows that apparently s o m e
women still accept stereotypes
about women in a working world
and she said attitudes will have
to change in both males and
females.
On the statement that "a suc-
cessful woman is less attractive to
men," 27 per cent of the women
and 21 per cent of the men agreed.
On another, 67 per cent of the
women and 68 per cent of the men
agreed that males resent a female
boss.
The guidelines released yester-

day by the labor department pro-
hibit such things as advertising
in newspaper columns headed
"Male" or "Female" unless sex is
a bona fide occupational qualifica-
tion. It prohibits making any dis-
tinction between married or un-
married persons of just one sex
and denying employment to
women with young children unless
the same policy exists for men.,
It establishes child bearing as a
justified reason for leaves of ab-
sence. And it prohibits seniority
based solely on sex, or retirement
requirements for women that dif-
fer from those for men.
The task force report says there
is widespread discrimination
against women and urges the
President to take steps to stop it.
Unless something is done, it says,
the nation may experience "ac-
celerating militancy" or. at the
other extreme, "deadening apa-
thy.".

College Press Service
WASHINGTON (CPS) - Uni-
versities do more to aggravate the
problems of homosexuals in con-
temporary American society than
to alleviate them, according to Dr.
Franklin Kameny, author of The
Same Sex and founder and presi-
dent of the Mattachine Society of
Washington.
A nationally-recognized expert
on homosexuality, Kameny was
interviewed by College Press Ser-
vice to obtain some perspective on
the upsurge of homosexual activ-
ity on U.S. college campuses.
Stanford, San Jose State, Cornell
and the University of Minnesota
are among schools where homo-
sexuals have formed clubs within
the past year.
At the University, the Gay Lib-
eration Front (GLF) was formed
during the month of March and
recognized by Student Govern-
ment Council as a student organ-
ization in early April. Presently,
the local group is working to over-
come President Robben Fleming's
opposition to a Midwest Confer-
ence on Homosexuality, which
GLF is trying to sponsor here.
Colleges a n d universities dis-
criminate against homosexuals in
the areas of counseling, curricu-

lum and social activity, Rameny
said.
Counseling provided homosex-
uals is "abysmally poor," accord-
ing to Kamey, because counselors
tend to approach homosexuality
as a form of deviant behavior, at-
tacking "not the problems, but
the state." Instead of encouraging
the homosexual to accept his na-
ture, he said, counselors react as
though homosexuality were some-
thing bad that needs change.
College curriculums, he said,
are conspicuously absent of cours-
es on homosexuality. New York
University offered the first course
on homosexuality last fall, Kam-
eny said, and if m o r e schools
would offer such courses, homo-
sexuals wouldbenefit just as
blacks have benefitted from the
inclusion of courses on Afro-Asian
history and culture in various
academic programs.
Academic emphasis on homo-
sexuality, he said, could both help
to eliminate prejudice and ignor-
ance regarding homosexuals and
make homosexuals open, rather
than furtive and secretive about
themselves.
Concerning social activities, Dr.
Kameny said, administrations and

student governments should make in view
offices and ballrooms just as educati
available to student homosexual ed prim
groups as to other campus organ- ple wh
izations. At Columbia, he said, the terest in
authorities permitted the staging GLF
of a "mixer dance" into which to fight
both homosexuals and heterosex- last we
uals were admitted. ially job
If "mixer dances" were held at ter to F
numerous schools, he said, the consider
cause of integrating the homosex- Accor
ual into society would be aided. ence w
As a recognized student organ- homose
ization, the University's GLF is panel di
entitled to the use of University speciali
facilities and this Friday, is hold- religiou
ing a dance. Like the one at Co- to the
lumbia, it will be open to the pub- medical
lic. homose
However, GLF, with Fleming's Accor
opposition to a conference, h a s homose
apparently run into the very "very m
problem it is fighting. In a letter because
to Vice President for Student Af- base fro
fairs Barbara Newell, Fleming said I tions o
the proposed conference "ought, mosexu

of the law, to be clearly
onal in nature and direct-
narily towards those peo-
o have a professional in-
n the field."
has said it will continue
t for the conference, and
ek SGC members unoffic-
ned them in writing a let-
Fleming, asking him to re-
r.
ding to GLF, the confer-
ould "offer workshops on
xuality, public lectures and
iscussions by such outside
sts as jurists, doctors and
s leaders who would speak
public at large on legal,
l and religious aspects of
xuality."
rding to Kameny, student
xual organizations a r e
nuch needed" on campuses
they can serve as a power
om which to protest viola-
f the civil liberties of ho-
als, educate the university

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Eves
6:25, 9:05

MIHGgN

Matinees
1:00, 3:40

"AIRPORT is a great film all the way!"
-Chicago Doily New:
A ROSS HUNTER Production vcg aN
BURT LANCASTER -DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG JACQUELINE BISSET - GEORGE KENNEDY
HELEN HAYES - VAN HEFLIN - MAUREEN STAPLETON
BARRY NELSON - LLOYD NOLAN AU T;u; n ;,H0
DANA WYNTER - BARBARA HALE ®"r -
Mon.-Thurs. Fri.-Sat. All Day
Eves. Eves. Sunday
$2.25 $2.50 $2.25
Matinees Monday thru Saturday $1.75
Read and Use Daily Classifieds

protesters to stiff pris

-Daily--Richard Lee
EGGinomical cookery
A sure sign of hot weather is the traditional "frying-an-egg-on-
the-sidewalk" event and yesterday's 90 degree heat was all Susan
Messer needed to give it a try. Perhaps it was just such a side-
walk cook who first asked, "Do you want your egg sunny side up?"

NO NGC THEATRE cORPORATION M-Thur. 8:15 only
NOWA NATIONAL GENERAL COMPANY Fri. 6:30, 10:00
W G Sat. 1:30, 5:30,
SHOWING FUN VIL~ab Sun. 1:00, 4:30,
375 No. MAPLE RD.-7694300 8 :15
a wadleigh-maurice, ltd. production
technicolor® from warner bros.
PASS LIST SUSPENDED

CHICAGO W)-A federal judge
sentenced seven antiwar demon-
strators to five years in prison
yesterday for destroying Selective
Service System records and gave
stiffer punishment to three absent
defendants who, he said, master-
minded the assault.
Judge Edwin A. Robson of U.S.
District Court described the mis-
DIAL 8-6416
ENDS WEDNESDAY

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an of-
ficial publication of the University of
Aicligan. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 33281
L.SA. Bldg., before 2 p.m. of the day
preceeding publication and by 2 p.m.1
Friday for Saturday and Sunday. Items
appear once only, Student organi~a-1
tion notices are not accepted for pub-
lication. For more information, phone
764-9270,
Day-Calendar
Wednesday, June 10
Summer Piano Concert Series Ushers:
Ushers will be needed for Summer
Piano Concert Series to be presented in
Rackham Auditorium during July, and
sponsored by the Univ. Musical Society.
Persons interested in signing up to
usher please come to the box office at
Hill Aid. today, June 11. between 7 &
8 p.m., and see Mr. Wartner.

"SMASHHIT'."-

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- N EWSWEEK

sing three as the ringleaders of a
raid May 25, 1969 on a draft board
complex and sentenced them to
10 years in jail.
In pronouncing sentence, the
judge dismissed the defense con-
tention that the demonstrators'
action was nonviolent and said
the incident was "violence, the
violence that can bring about
revolution."
He said he hoped the penalties
were severe enough to deter other
youths from staging similar at-
tacks on draft boards,
Robson sentenced the fugitive
defendants to five years in prison
on each of two counts in the in-
dictment and said the terms were
to run consecutively.
They are Linda J. Quint, 22, of
Chicago, the Rev. Nicholas J. Rid-
dle, 40, a Carmelite priest of Mil-
waukee, and Charles Muse, 21, of
Roxbury, Mass.
The seven defendants in the
courtroom also were sentenced to
five years on each of the two
counts, but the judge said those
terms would run concurrently.
He ruled that all 10 defendants
would be placed on 10 years pro-
bation for the other two counts
in the indictment, to begin at the
conclusion of their prison terms.
Robson denied appeal bond for
the seven defendants in the court-
room. He'said the fact that Father
Riddell, Miss Quint and Muse
jumped bond near the end of the
trial was a major factor in his
decision.
The seven had been held with-

"Meyer's unabashedly.. .luscious...best!"
Kevin Thomas-L.A. TIMES

-U

"A fun drama about
a swinging lady!"
Judith Crist-N.Y. MAGAZINE
"Meyer.'s best..a
merciless put on.
Erica Gavin...
electrifying

The most
electrifying
ritual ever
seen!
RICHARD HARRIS
CALLD HORE"
f see

HELD
OVER

The strange ritual of love be-
tween the Indian Princess and
the white man.
The torture of the white man as
he fights to become an Indian
PAHNAVISIONTEC I NICOLOR
GPPAREN'T'AL GUIDANCE
SUGGESTED
SHOWS AT:

LARRY KRAMER and
MARTIN ROSEN Present
KEN RUSSELL'S film o
Do H. LAWRENCE'S
COLOR by Deluxe United Aria
-Thursday-
"Scratch Harry"
and
"Bedazzled"

I

u

BACH CLUB
presents
RANDOLPH SMITH
Bach Club President & Founder,
speaking on
"RHYTHM IN BACH"
featuring Bach's F Minor
harpsicord concerto
Refreshments & FUN afterwards
THURS., JUNE 11, 8 P.M.
Canterbury House
330 Maynard
EVERYONE WELCOME!
(no musical knowledge needed!)
Great way to meet
interesting people
663-2827, 761 -6981

Roger Ebert
CHICAGO
SUN-TIMES

RUSS MEYER'S

RATING
NO ONE UNDER 1,8 ADMITTED!
PIP'TH FOrUM
{fIFTH AVBNLU AT LI3QERTY
DOWNf~TOWN ANN ARBOR
INFRAnTION 76-9700
6:50, 8:10, 9:30

662-4251 740 PACKARD 662-4241
On Wt
Hangers SHIRTS'Dr
Or _Cleaning
Packaged Order
HOURS COIN OPERATED LAUNDRY OPEN
Mon. thru Fri. 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m: MON.-SUN. 7:30 A.M. TO 11 P.M.
Saturday 7:30a.m. to 6 p.m. WASHERS STILL ONLY 25c, DRYERS 5c

OBSERVER!
fC
Color Vision
You must be Red-
2-6 hours
Rates: $1
CALL: S. Mil

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INTRODUCING ERICA GAVIN AS VIXEN PRODUCED AND DIRECTED BY RUSS MEYER
AN EVE PRODUCTION IN EASTMANCOLOR RESTRICTED TO ADULT AUDIENCES

or walk in-5
University of Michi
Ann a

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