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June 06, 1970 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-06

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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Soturdcay, June 6, 1970

Four THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, June 6, 1970

Chiefs
NEW YORK UP) - Mike Gar-
rett, the No. 1 running back
for Kansas City's Super Bowl
champions, said yesterday he
w ill formally announce plans
next Monday to quit playing
pro football after the 1970 sea-
son a n d begin a professional
baseball career.
Garrett, who throughout his
standout career in the Ameri-
can Football League has main-
tained he would leave the sport
when his original five-year con-
tract ran out, told The As-
sociated Press "I intend to play
baseball and will negotiate with
the Los Angeles Dodgers.'
Garrett was selected 81st in
baseball's annual free agent

Garrett

to

try

baseball

AT FLOOD TRIAL

draft by the Dodgers yesterday
on behalf of their Bakersfield,
Calif. team in the California
League.
Garrett currently is in New
York City with his agent, Al
Ross, and said he would ex-
plain all his plans Monday at a
3 p.m., EDT, press conference.
Garrett immediately stepped
into the Chief's starting line-up
in 1966 and gained 801 yards
rushing and 175 pass receiving
his rookie year. In 1967, he join-
ed the select 1,000-yard club by
gaining 1,087 yards rushing and
also caught 46 passes for 261
yards.
Garrett was in the top 10 in
both rushing and receiving last

season, gaining 732 yards for a
4.4 average on the ground and
catching 43 passes for 432 yards.
He scored a touchdown on a
five-yard run in the Chiefs' 23-
7 Super Bowl victory over the
Minnesota Vikings.
At the time he was pursued
by both the R a m s and the
Chiefs, it was generally con-
sidered that nothing could lure
Garrett from Los Angeles. The
Chiefs seemed to agree w i t h
that estimate by making the
Heisman.Trophy winner only a
20th round selection.
The Chiefs, however, persuad-
ed Garrett to play in Kansas
City on the lucrative five-year
pact. He often has spoken about
not playing beyond that period
and last July in training camp
said he was considering a ca-
reer in politics after his con-
tract ran out.
Garrett, who is 26, played 38
games for the USC baseball
team in 1965 and hit .302 with
six home runs and 20 runs bat-
ted in.
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

*

*

*

NBA, ABA said to be
near merger completion
DALLAS UP)-Merger negotiations between the American Bas-
ketball Association and the National Basketball Association are
so close to completion that Congressional approval is expected to
be asked by the end of June, the Dallas Times Herald said it
learned yesterday.
The two professional leagues have been authorized by the
courts to continue merger negotiations, and merger committees
are expected to complete the talks in Atlanta. June 17-18, the
newspaper said.
"I anticipate that the merger committees will get together
in Atlanta," Joe Geary, owner of the Texas Chaparrals of the
ABA, said.
"And we think we are close enough together to where merger
negotiations between the two league will be consummated at that
time." Geary said.

Playe rs
NEW YORK (A) - John Ga-
herin, the labor relations' ne-
gotiator for the major league
club owners, testified in t h e
Curt Flood case yesterday that
the owners had negotiated in
good f a i t h in an attempt to
modify baseball's reserve sys-
tem before the suit was institut-
ed.
Gaherin also characterized
the relative bargaining
strengths of the clubs and the
players in negotiations "as
about as equal as any situation
can produce."
Gaherin pointed out in testi-
mony for baseball's defendants
in the $3 million antitrust suit
that the owners had recognized
their obligation to bargain col-
lectively with the players over
the reserve system during 1967.
"Did the owners ever assert
it was not a subject for collec-
tive bargaining?" asked attor-
ney Sandy Hadden.

"No," replied Gaherin. Ga-
herin then said there had been
a period when the two parties
engaged in a joint study and,
finally, in August, 1969, t h e
Players Association had asked
that negotiations be opened on
the subject of the reserve clause
and related rules.
Under cross examination Ga-
herin admitted that the owners
never had put forward a. pro-
Personality
scratched
at Belmont
NEW YORK M)-Personality,
heavily-favored to add the Bel- ..
mont Stakes to his Preakness
victory, was scratched late yes-
terday afternoon from this third
leg of the Triple Crown because
of a cough that began earlier
in the week.
Trainer John Jacobs, making

posal to modify the key provis-
ion of the reserve system - the
option nenewal clause that
binds a player to the club that
signs him until he is traded,
sold or released.
He also agreed that no other
business contained such a con-
tract between employer and em-
ploye but took exception with
attorney Jay Topkis that the
form of t h a t contract put a
player in "servitude."
Gaherin also s a i d under
cross examination that the
owners had made no specific
proposals to change the option
renewal clause or any other of
the matters in which the Play-
ers Association made formal
proposals. Baseball's defendants
are expected to call one more
witness before resting, an econ-
omist.

benefits cited

LECKurt
)eiter&
____ ____ ____ ____A. LEE KIRK.

ARBOUR TO COACH BLUES
N-th etarcflE~P h ire Bu rnsC

Good old soccer .*..
.. .something for everyone
The World's Soccer Championship is now being contested
in Mexico City, and there is nothing else like it in the world of
sports. Beside it, the World Series and the Super Bowl look like
side shows at the country fair. Yet, here in the USA, no one
seems to care about soccer, while in all the rest of the world,
it is THE number one sport.
People in this country cannot understand what people every-
where else see in soccer, while the rest of the world just cannot
understand how we could call that gridiron madness "futbol."
Soccer never caught on in this country, although a few years
back, a group of daring promotors dropped a fortune trying
to create a national soccer leage. Collegiate soccer is widespread,
but there is fan interest in only a few places and a goodly num-
ber of the better players are foreign students. The average
American boy still plays his games on sandlots and blacktop.
To most Americans, soccer seems like the dullest sport'
they know. A contest with more than four goals is high-
scoring and good scoring opportunities are few and far
between. Much of the action takes place away from the goals,
because the field is so big. Soccer by its nature seems to
Americans to be a game oriented towards defense, and de-
fense is something alien to our temperament.
There are, however, a great many things that soccer has
going for it. It is just about the most grueling sport around.
The game is made up of two forty-five minute halves, and
virtually no substitution is allowed. That adds up to an in-
credible amount of running around, often on legs battered and
bruised from fouls and tackles by the opposition. You have to
be mentally as well as physically tough to endure the punish-
ment.
Soccer is also a game that everyone can understand and
everyone can play. There is not the emphasis on specialized skills
in soccer that there is in sports such as baseball and American
football. Soccer is played with the feet and the head, mostly the
feet, an din countries where soccer is a way of life, every five
year old can do things with the ball that would amaze you.
Soccer is a game of the people, all the people. All you need
play it is a field and ball. Everyone who plays gets a piece of
the action-hogging the ball just won't work.
In much younger and happier days, I played a good deal
of soccer. All the fourth and fifth graders in my elementary.
school were formed into teams, and we had a regular league at
Tecess. There were only ten men on a team instead of eleven,
and my team had six girls. I was the goalie and three of my four
defensive backs.were girls. They did all the work, I gave less
than a goal per game, and we won the championship and beat
the All-Stars, a feat still unmatched.
Soccer was a great game to play. Everybody loved it,
nobody minded having girls on the team, and it was good
clean fun. If Americans would start playing soccer, they
might find themselves enjoying playing it, if not watching
it played.
But all this still leaves one aspect of soccer unexplained--
the rabid fan. Soccer probably causes more deaths and violence
than any other sport, and the victims are not the players, but
the fans. Soccer fans assault refs, throw everything but the
stadium foundation at the refs and/or visiting team, battle each
other, and in the case of Honduras and El Salvador, they can
even set off a war.
Most Americans, myself included, cannot quite understand
this fanaticism, although I imagine that it helps let off steam
and vent represed emotions. The Met fanatic looks like Mr.
Peepers beside even a tame soccer partisan. The game itself
is to me is fun to play, but not teriribly thrilling to watch. Still,
there is an aura and atmosphlere of excitement which surrounds
a soccer game that makes it a truly unique sport.

1 "X LAX Si K/k,.. 4t C0 iXX Ut ik.

Baltimore
New York
Washington
Detroit
Boston
xC leve land

East
:3a
30'
24
'0
West

I.
17
99
25
25

Pc't.
.67 3
.566
.480
.473
.479
.426

Minnesota 3? 15 .68
xCalifornia 31 19).62t
Oakland 28 24 .5:0
Kansas City 19 31 .38
Chicago 19 32 .37:
Milwaukee 15 35 .30
x-late game not included
Yesterday's Results
Oakland 4, Detroit 2
Baltimore 3, Milwaukee 2
New York 10. Chicago 1
Boston 4, Kansas City 2
Minnesota 2, Washington I
Cleveland at California, inc.

81
'(1
38
80
it3

G13
51
10
11
10
1- 4
sty
141
15
G13
414
414.
51>
8
12
14
151">

By The Associated Press
The Minnesota North Stars
of the National Hockey League
announced yesterday that Char-
lie Burns, who led the club to
their highest finish in three
NHL seasons, will not be re-
hired to coach next season.
However, North Star General
Manager Wren Blair said that
Burns has been signed to a two-
year contract as a player.
Sa wchuch
buried
PONTIAC, Mich. (A) - Ter-
ry Sawchuk's seven children
wept quietly yesterday after-
noon as their 40-year-old fa-
ther was buried while battered
and scarred veterans of t h e
National Hockey League look-
ed on.
Sawchuk, a goalie for t h e
New York Rangers, died Sun-
d a y of complications follow-
ing surgery for removal of his
gall bladder. Sawchuk was
hospitalized after a scuffle
with teammate-roommate Ron
Stewart,ewho was an honorary
pallbearer at the funeral. An
investigation into the fight
continues in New York.

In St. Louis, the NHL's Blues
named 37-year defenseman Dale
Arbour as coach, replacing Scot-
ty Bowman, who quit to devote
full-time to his general man-
ager's job.
Burns, 34, took over the
coaching job from Blair last De-
cember 30 and sparked the ex-
pansion team to a third-place
finish in the NHL's West Divi-
sion.
Ironically, it was probably
Burn's 2-20-8 record when he
was strictly a bench coach that
cost him a chance to coach
again. The North Stars had
slipped into fifth place when
Burns himself on the active
player list on March 1.
Skating primarily with the
penalty killing unit, Burns'
tough defensive play sparked
the North Stars to a 9-5-3 rec-
ord from that point and a play-
off berth.
Terms of the two-year con-
tract for Arbour, who began his
-

1 ./. t4_1U...L3XXOthe announcement in the press
box at Belmont Park, said he
professional career with Detroit f . ,
in 1953, were not disclosed.felt 'that i the horse's present
Arbour played on three Stan- condition he could not do his
ley Cup championship teams- best. In fairness to the fans and
Detroit, Chicago and Toronto- racing, I want to make an-
before joining the Blues as a nouncement now."
third round selection in the _
league's expansion draft.
A native of Sudbury, Ontario,
he was elected to the West Di-
vision NHL All-Star team the
past two season.
,J UMBO Y
V (
O / M -M-m-m-m, yummie!
PO I~TTERA giant hamburger of 114 lb. U.S.
Govt. pure beef topped with let-
tuce, tomato, mayonnaise, onions,
fJ pickles and ketchup .
SpringSale/ I EEOYaR
p ngWest of Arborland
v Sunday, June l ---*----
I 9:00A.M.-3:00OP.M. °
21Hill _________

NATIONALsLEAGUE'
East

LARRY KRAMER and
MARTIN ROSEN present
KEN RUSSELL'S film of
Di H. LAWRENCE
IN LOE";
COLOR by Deluxe united Artism
DIAL 8-6416
(Z Tj 1

OA

Chicago
New York
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
Montreal
Cincinnati
Los Angeles
Atlanta
San Francisco
San Diego

W I,
27 20
25 26
9" 25
25 28
21 29
17 33
W~est
38 15
30 21
29 20.
25 29
?4 29
24 3'?

Pett.
.574
'493
.479
.472
.420
.340
.717
.588
.592
.463
,453
.429

Yesterday's Results
Montreal 3, Atlanta 2
Cincinnati 5, New York 4
Houston 8, Philadelphia r
Pittsburgh 3, Los Angeles 0
San Diego 3, St rLouis 2
Chicago 12, San Francisco 8

SPECIAL JUNE
STEREO SALE
Hundreds of "Specials"
0 receivers 0"changers
0 speakers 0 hi fi
0 musical instruments

HI-Fl STUDIO
121 W . W a shsfgton d
German Restaurant-668-7942
PRESENTS 00 the'
the phantom of theI
FLOATING OPERA
one dolar
330 Maynard, 665-0606 TONIGHT
doors open 8p.m.*
Tonight, Saturday-June 6
Eves Matinees
6:25, 9:05 H00aI1FaI-i--I 1:00ET3:40Y
"'A IR PO RT' is a great film all the way!"
-chico Daily News dir. CHARLES WALTER H956)
A ROSS HUNTER Production i
A quick-paced musical starring Bing Crosby,
Z BURT LANCASTER -DEAN MARTIN Grace Kelly, and Frank Sinatra. Louis Arm-
JEAN SEBERG JACQUELINE BISSET - GEORGE KENNEDY I strong provides the sound for Cole Porter's
HELEN HAYES - VAN HEFLIN - MAUREEN STAPLETON
BARRY NELSON - LLOYD NOLAN " N "E"4 ""'EE - show stopping score.
DANA WYNTER - BARBARA HALEro. .
Dn.TEursBAr-SaRAHALED "A souffle for people not tired of eggs."
Mon.-Thurs. Fri.-Sat. All Day
Eves. - Eves. ' Sundav
__ $2.25 $2.50 Sunday
MONDAY THRU SATURDAY MATINEES $1.75 SHORT: Excerpts from Safety Last
-__ _ (Harold Lloyd)
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75C AUDITORIUM
I

;:;:j "
beh we

hr
4*

Today's World Cup Games
Group I
Russia vs. Belgium
Group 11,
Uruguay vs. Italy
G;roup III
Rumania vs. Czechoslovakia
Group IV
Peru vs. Morocco

PTM

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OBSERVERS WANTED
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Color Vision Experiments
You must be Red-Green Color Blind

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City Folk
& Folk Rock
SUNDAY, 5 P.M.-
COMMUNAL
DINNER

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