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June 04, 1970 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-04

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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday. June 4. 1970

i

Baseball--a bastion of reaction

Eves.
6:25, 9:05

-Ci.

Matinees
1:00, 3:40

By LEE KIRK
1HE GENERAL turmoil and confusion
that is generally associated with the
news these days is rapidly spreading into the
docile confines of sports. Crises and court
cases abound, and the sporting world is
rapidly finding itself becoming a microcosm
of our universal woes.
And, surprisingly enough, the sport
most afflicted is baseball, the national
pasttime. Grievances that have long
boiled, below the surface have finally
"Flooded" over their banks, and a lot
of dirty linen that management would
have liked kept in the closet has been
washed and hung out for all to see.
Most conspicuous, is of course, former
Cardinal outfielder Curt Flood's suit chal-
lenging baseball's reserve clause. The reserve
clause is a complex thing,,so complex in fact,
that the Supreme Court once refused to
hear a case involving it and instead declared
that Congress should regulate baseball. What
the reserve clause does in effect is to bind
a player to a club that signed him for as
long as that club wishes to have him around.
When a club trades a player, he then can
only play ball for the club to which he is

traded or else t r a i p s e off to Japan.
This all sounds like legalized slavery,
which is exactly the effect it is designed
to have. The reason that the clause has hung
around in spite of this drawback is that
baseball is now exempt from federal anti-
trust laws because it is not legally rec-
ognized as being interstate commerce. Foot-
ball and boxing are interstate operations
and are recognized as such in light of the
law, but baseball, sacred and all-powerful,
is not.
Owners fear that if the reserve clause is
declared illegal, ballplayers will desert their
teams for the highest bidder. The owners
contend that this would result in the rich
teams getting the good players and the end
of fan confidence in a game.
This option clause will almost cer-
tainly come to baseball, most likely as
the result of Flood's suit. And when it
does come, I have great confidence in
management's ability to weather the
storm.
If fan confidence would be eroded by the
end of the reserve clause, Commissioner
Bowie Kuhn must be trying to wash it away.
Kuhn, along with many press people as-

sociated with baseball, have really unloaded
on Astro and ex-Yankee pitcher Jim Bouton
for his mini-expose book, "Ball Four."
Although I haven't seen the book, the
plethora of publicity it aroused even before
publication will make reading it anti-
climactic. Mickey Mantle comes away from
the book tarnished idol, and other players
as well as managers also emerge tainted.
Tiger pitchers are said to be the biggest
pep and pain pill users in the majors, etc.,
etc., etc.
The upshot of it all came when Kuhn
asked Bouton to pay a private visit to his
office to discuss the book. After the meet-
ing, Kuhn emerged to face the press.
"I advised Mr. Bouton of my dis-
pleasure with these writings," the com-
missioner said, "and have warned him
against future writings of this char-
acter."
He couldn't have been more pompous if
he had tried. That he feels that it is within
his domain as Commissioner of Baseball to
tell ballplayers what to write is, to say the
least, galling. In some ways, it's a pity
Bouton didn't laugh in Kuhn's face, but if
he had, his book might not sell so well.

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Read and Use Daily Classifieds

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Dinnerserved until 2am(closed Mondays)-211N. Main-663-7752
(gtevross from the old Poat Ofie
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v~SHO3WS AT: 1 :00-
3:00-5:00-7:00-9:05
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SOCCER CHAMPIONSHIPS

Special

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$8.95

Braz'l
MEXICO CITY (P) - Right
winger Jairzinho slammed in
two goals in Brazil's 4-1 thrash-
ing of Czechoslovakia yesterday
and gave warning to the world
that Brazil is back as one of
the strongestteams in the World
Soccer Cup championships.
Brazil's other goals came from
Pele-known as "the king" in
South America-and Rivelino.
In other group matches, West
Germany, which lost to England
in the 1966 World Cup finals,
survived a hard time against
Late Score
Detroit 5, California 4, 11 inn.
World Cup Soccer
Yesterday's Results
Group I
Belgium 3, El Salvador 0
Group II
Italy 1, Sweden 0.
Group III
Brazil 4, Czechoslovakia 1
Group IN
West Germany ?, Morocco 1
L 9 &
Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

routs
underdog Morocco and wounc
up a 2-1 winner.
Wilfried Van Moer was th
star in Belgium's 3-0 victory
over El Salvador.
Angelo Domenghini scorec
Italy's goal in a 1-0 victory over
Sweden with a powerful shot
from 22 yards.
Brazil, winner of the chain-
pionship in 1958 and 1962, and
England have been firm favor-
ites for the Jules Rimet Trophy
for months.
The Brazilians slipped from
favor following the firing 01
Jaoa Saldhana. But the South
American masters proved to the
world yesterday that they still
are soccer's giants.
The Czechs took an early lead
and it looked as though an upset
was in the making. But Brazil
hit back with a free kick from
Rivelino which swerved round a
defensive wall and left goal-
keeper Viktor grasping the air.
Pele-probably the most fa-
mous soccer player in the world
and back to his brilliant best
put Brazil ahead in the second
half.
Then came Jairzihno's twc
goals, the second a right foot
drive capping a 40-yard run in
which he beat three men.
S. Africa lets
i n Hawaiian
surfing star
DURBAN (A) - South Africa
has granted a visa to top Ha-
waiian surfer Ben Aipa to com-
pete in the "Durban 500" surf-
ing contest July 4 and 5.
There had been some question
as to whether Aipa. a native Ha-
waiian who is described here
as having dark complexion and
curly black hair, would be al-
lowed into this country with its
apartheid policy.
Nonwhite athletes have been
baned in the past and South
African sports along with every-
thing else are rigidly segregated

Czechoslovakia

T H IS W EEK
HIF BY

ONLY!
Arbor

*

*

*

Reserve clause praised
as essential by owners

Ann

618S. Main St.

LM

U

NEW YORK (I)-Two base-
ball club owners, Francis Dale
of. the Cincinnati Reds and
John McHale of the Montreal
Expos, testified yesterday in the
Curt Flood suit that they would
not have invested in the sport
without their belief that base-
ball enjoyed exemption from
antitrust laws.
The issue is a key to base-
ball's defense in the Flood case,
the sport contending that sub-
jecting the rules and regula-
tions of the game-known as
the reserve system-to antitrust
laws would drive away would-
be-investors.
Both were asked if they would
have invested without those be-
liefs. Dale said "I don't think
we would have." McHale an-
swered, "No."
They also were asked by base-
ball's Chief Counsel, M a r k
Hughes, if they considered the
reserve system reasonable and
necessary to the efficient opera-
tion of the sport. Both said they
did.
Dale, who also is a part owner
of pro football's Cincinnati Ben-
gals, was sharply cross examined
by Flood's counsel, Jay Topkis,
specifically with reference to
his investment in pro football
which operates without the re-
serve system and little antitrust
exemptions.
"Does that render football an

economically unsound invest-
ment?" Topkis asked.
"No," replied Dale.
"The fact that the Bengals
were not exempt from antitrust
laws didn't deter you from in-
vesting in them, did it?" Topkis
asked.
"No," Dale replied.
Billboard"
This Friday night will be staff
and family recreation night at
the IM Building from 7-10 p.m.
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1

Yesterday's Results
Houston 5, Montreal 0
New York at Atlanta, ppd.
Philadelphia 11, Cincinnati 4
Chicago 6, Los Angeles 5, 11 inn.
San Diego at Pittsburgh, ppd.
St. Louis 6, San Francisco 5
Today's Games
Montreal at Houston, night
New York at Atlanta, night
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh, night
Other clubs not scheduled

_I

I

PRESENTS
the FLOATING OPERA
doing their own tunes
Friday and Saturday -9 P.M.-one dollar
330 Maynard 665-0606

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East
W L Pet.
Baltimore 34 16 .680
New York 28 23, .549
Washington 24 24 .50
Detroit 22 24 .478
Boston 21 25 .457
Cleveland s) 27 .413
West
Minnesota 31 14 .689
California 31 18 .631
Oakland 26 24 .520
Kansas City 19 29 .396
Chicago 18 31 .367
Milwaukee 15 33 .313
Yesterday's Results
Oakland 4, Baltimore 1
Cleveland 7, Milwaukee 6
Detroit at California, inc.
Washington 5, Chicago 4
New York 5, Kansas City 3
Minnesota at Boston,appd.
Today's Games
Detroit at California, night
Baltimore at Oakland, night
Cleveland at Milwaukee, night
Minnesota at Boston

GB
0"
114
11
13
x
I3t
13%z
15
17%

Kansas City at New York, night
Chicago at Washington, night

Amusements HE EVENING STAR
* * * Washngton, 0.C., Tuesday, January 2,17
THE PASSING SHOW
obscene, No; FuennyAbsc
Sy HARRY MacARTHUR
Dram CriticmsoTetar
Sweden, which used to be with deftness and style by Whatever you do is all right, wh
headquarters for nude Miss Meineche. just so long as nobody else pai
movies and sex movies, may ' You do have to be pre- gets hurt. bro
declare war on Denmark pared to go along with com- "To desist from sexual mu
over "Without a Stitch" This plete candor, maybe more pleasure," he adjures, "is not wea
is the funniest satire on than you ever have seen or more moral than desisting upI
Swedish sex films that you beard on the screen. You from picking flowers, read- late
are likely to encounter in also have to be prepared for ing books, or skiing...." Un- him
months, maybe even in a great deal of nudity and less you go along with this, L
years. sex. both that which is con- you had better avoid deep sta
Don't be put off by the sidered normal and that shock by avoiding "Without co
publicity and advertising be- which is considered aberra- a Stitch." stud
ing used to tout the new pic- tional. * * * * He
ture at Loew's Palace. It is The sex is clearly simu- With this sage advice the ing
not one of those "skin flicks" lated. but the nudity is not. doctor dispatches Lilian on a Th
that belongs on Ninth St. It's And all you prudes had bet- hitch-hiking vacation with a an<
a sharply comic entertain- ter be prepared for the .fact brand-new diary in which to lear
ment that employs sex and that no healthy, young, red- record her new experiences thri
nudity for a purpose rather blooded boy in the audience with life. She has some ex- two
than for exploitation. is going to be repelled by the periences, too. F
Alongside it, ''I Am Cur- sight of Anne Grete, who Her first ride is with a sou
ous (Yellow)" looks more plays the girl who keeps get- movie cameraman. This a f
than ever like a stag movie ting undressed. She just leads her right into movie sce
made for male smokers. I sat might be the second most stardom, in a stag movie tw
there in the dull morning beautiful girl in the world, made in Sweden for export vol
laughing my head off while dressed or undressed. only, and if they wouldn't rea
the voyeurs. who never . , show it there, you know this woi
should have allowed them- Miss Grete plays a college is an experience. wer
selves to be lured south of student named Lilian, who She goes on to Copen- bra
New York Ave. by the ads, goes to a doctor because she hagen, where she meets an ech
stalked out in boredom and has failed to achieve the ulti- architectural student named sha
befuddlement. mate enjoyment in a sexual Lise. Lise spends a happy
**encounter with her boy night with her, then intro-
"Without a Stitch." is a friend, who is as clumsy in duces her to a new gambol-
sort of "Candy" made with these matters as she is. The one man and two girls. He
good taste and an alert sense doctor explains - this has doesn't appear to be quite
of hunmor. It's not the cheapie pretensions of being a sex,- temain isfortred byndthes
its title suggests, but a well- education film pretensons a suspicion is bostered by the
made film. It has been hand- doesn't need-that it is more fact that director Meineche
somely photographed in blessed to give than receive. quickly cuts to Germany.

aIutely
ere the featured act is a
r of bosom-dropping
ads wrestling in a pool of
d. She is rescued by a
althy German and winds
being whipped to stimu-
e his desires and whipping
mto satisfy them.
Lilian takes off, under-
ndably, and this time.
mes up with an English art
dent on the way to Italy.
puzzles her by not mak-
a pass at her for days.
en they get to Italy, meet
old friend of his and she
rms about another of those
ee-way deals, this time
o men and one girl.
However, this account
nds, "Without a Stitch" is
unny movie, not an ob-
ne one, largely due to the
o women principally in-
ved. Miss Grete, who is a
l beauty, plays it with a
nderful innocence, as if it
re "Rebecca of Sunny-
ok Farm." Miss Mein-
e has directed it with
rp and subtle wit.
_r'.-

Haspel:
the
light
fantastic
What other pin-
cord looks so
sophisticated,
reacts so cooly to
weather, and doesn't
cost an arm-and-a-leg?
Haspel does it again
In Summer 70, with a
lightweight Dacronv
polyester blend tailored
in a traditional three-
button model with
somewhat wider lapel
and deep center vent
Light blue or olive
(they're both so great
You'll want one of each).
Priced at an easy-to-
take $65

0

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