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May 13, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-05-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAtLY

Thursday, May 13, 1971

Pag Egh TE MCHGA DtLYThrsay Ma 1, 97

NEW COURSE STRUCTURES

Mixed Bowling League
SUMMER RATES
win a SIGN UP NOW!
Free Game Opena at Noon
MICHIGAN UNION
ACCOUNTING MAJORS
EARN $12,000 ANNUALLY
National organization working exclusively with college housing
units (fraternities, sororities, independent dorms) seeks man to
establish and operate office on campus of his choice. We have
the only computerized accounting system in the country pro-
grammed for undergraduate housing record-keeping. This program
can be handled on a part-time basis evenings until full potential
is reached. Extremely small cash outlay required. If you want a
secure income with real growth opportunity, write today for
complete details.
FRATERNITY ALUMNI SERVICE
Division of The Carson Company
611 South Boulevard, Evanston, I1. 60202 9 Tel. 312/869-8330

Computers
(Coetilled teem Page 2
Finally, there is the relatively
new area of computer-animated
movies, developed by Phillips
with an initial seed grant from
the University's Office of Re-
search Administration and a
subsequent one from the Na-
tional Science Foundation. Very
simply, a special camera is po-
sitioned in front of a CRT and,
by means of a computer hookup,
shoots one frame at a time as
each new picture is displayed on
the CRT.
By means of this process, Dr.
Henry Pollack and Michael Levy
of the geology department made
a film showing the general ero-
sion process of the Grand Can-
yon, compressing thousands of
years of geological activity into
a few minutes. In making the
film, Pollack extrapolated a one-
stream and a two-stream model
for the past few million years.
As plotted by the computer on
the basis of data on soil struc-
ture and rate of erosion, the

enhance 'Ii
two-stream model produced the
result which most-nearly ap-
proximated the present Grand
Canyon. Discounting program-
ming costs, which are negligible
if a student eager for experience
can be found, the film cost may
run as low as $25 for a two-mi's-
ute, 16 mm film.
While the film's use is almost
entirely for presentation, t h e
other two applications mention-
ed above overlap into the second
general area of allowing the stu-
dent to feel more free to experi-
ment and to repeat problems.
With some programs, the stu-
dent can even t a k e his own
theories and test them out
against s o m e sort of general
program.
One example of such a gen-
eral program is the one used by
economics Prof. Robert Hol-
brook in his macro-economics
class. The program simulates a
large capitalist economy, much
like-that of the United States.
Students are free to make quar-
terly changes in f o u r critical
variables, such as money sup-
ply, as they attempt to maintain
a smoothly running economy.
In the natural resources school,
Prof. James McFadden is work-
ing on a somewhat similar pro-
gram which will allow students
to attempt to develop successful
methods for long-term manage-
ment of a salmon fishery.

instruction
One of the myths surround-
ing student use of the computer
is that only science and engin-
eering majors possess sufficient
technical knowledge to operate
a terminal. But as already indi-
cated, an increasing number of
uses are being found for t h e
computer in the social sciences
and even the humanities. In the
latter area, one of the most in-
teresting projects currently in
operation is journalism Prof.
Robert Bishop's editorial analy-
sis program.
Begun in July 1969, Bishop's
project is now nearing the end
of its fourth semester in class-
room use. The course, Journal-
ism 301, is designee for sopho-
mores with little or no news-
paper writing experience. Un-
like Phillips' use of the com-
puter as something of an ad-
junct, Bishop makes it an inte-
gral part of the course.
One week, the students will
be given a mimeographed book-
let, written by Bishop, dealing
with some aspect of journalis-
tic writing, such as ordering of
facts. The material is presented
in "programmed learning" form,
with material and questions
on one page, followed by the
answers and new material on
the next. The class is expected
to go through the book, and the
See COMPUTERIZED, Page 9

ir

ROYAL SCOT
55c
A giant hamburger meal
Scotty's
3362 Washtenow St. (Just up from Arborland'
program in Jewish Studies
(course offerings)
o Beginners' Hebrew
o Intermediate Hebrew
* Hebrew Speaking Club
0 Jewish Mysticism
* The Holocaust
* Martin Buber
0 Basic Judaism
0 Israel Experience Group
Late Registration will tlake place
Thursday, May 13; Friday, May 14;
Monday, May 17-from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. at
Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill St,
For Further Info, contact director
Rabbi Poupko-663-41 29

4

&~

MINI WHAT?
Mini Lesson. A key hole peek into a new dimen-
sion in reading. If you've been looking for the key
to more efficient reading spend an hour with us.
Get the facts from us at a Mini Lesson,
MINI-LESSON SCHEDULE
Thurs., May 13 4:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
STUDENT UNION-530 S. State
ASSEMBLY ROOM-GROUND FLOOR
O EVELYN WOOD
READING DYNAMICS
17320 West Eight Mile Road
-Sauthfield, Michigan 48075

*i

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