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May 11, 1971 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-05-11

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, May 1 1, 197 1

Page Twelve THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, May 11, 1971

D.C. divided
(Continued from Page 3)
Glared that the arrest of more
than 1,100 there was illegal.
Yesterday Atty. Gen. John
Mitchell compared last week's
Mayday demonstrators to Hit-
ler's brownshirts and said
"Nothing else could have been
done" except to make the mass
arrests that swept them off
Panthers change
(Continued from Page 2)
The basic ideology of the party
and its stance as a "life-style
revolution" organization tends
to steer it away from the more
traditional modes of protest of
the New Left. "We have called
demonstrations in the past and
will continue to call them, but
they are not the final end or
goal," Plamondon says.
She explains, "we feel that our
everyday lives are a demonstra-
tion. Just by walking down the
street, by the clothes we wear
and the music we listen to, we're
demonstrating where we're at."
The party does not, however,
shy away from means, with the
exception of violence, which it
feels will advance its goals.
In regard to established chan-
nels, Plamondon says, "We are
open to that." She cites the rock
concerts sponsored by the party
in Ann Arbor's West Park last
summer as an example of co-
operation with the city.
Although all the aims of the
party have not been realized in
their dealings with government
authorities, Plamondon says they
feel they are satisfied that
working with the city is a "vi-
able thing".
"We're willing to work with
anybody," she says, "in order to
meet the needs of our people.
That's our thing, to serve the
people".

after protest
Washington's streets by the
thousands.
Criticizing what he called the
"suspension of constitutional
guarantees and civil rights by
the chief of police", former
Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert
Ackerly suggested that a special
grand jury be established, on
the model of the one in Chi-
cago that investigated the
deaths of two Black aPnthers
during a police raid in late
1969, to investigate the legality
of police actions during the de-
monstrations.
Sponsors of end-the-war reso-
lutions in the House say their
efforts to sign up supporters
have been hurt by last week's
peace demonstrations in the
capital.
"There is no question about
it," said Rep. Charles Mosher
(R-Ohio), who is trying to get
Republicans to endorse a state-
ment calling for withdrawal of
U.S. tr o op s from Vietnam by
Dec. 31. "Several members told
me they want to go along on
the statement but aren't about
to under such pressure," he said.
"They don't want to seem to be
reacting to it."
Before last week's slowdown
in collecting signatures, both the
Republican and Democratic an-
tiwar statements had been pick-
ing up support. The latest count
shows 106 Democrats and 20
Republicans have signed them.
The statements are a pledge
by the members of the House to
support legislation calling for
withdrawal of all troops from
Vietnam by the end of the year.
The first test of the antiwar
strength in the House will prob-
ably come in June when the De-
fense Department budget auth-
orization bill should be ready
for action. Amendments to cut
off funds for carrying on the
war will be offered.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
Official publication o the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
room 3524 L.S.A. Bldg., before 2
p.m. of the day preceding publica-
tion and by 2 p.M. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items appear
Once only. Student organization
notices are not accepted for pub-
lication. For more information,
phone 64-9270.
TUESDAY, MAY 11
Day Calendar
Baseball: Mich. vs. W. Mich, Fisher
Stadium, 2 p.m
Placement
32011SA.
Interview correction:
Thurs., May 13, Bob Elms will inter-
aiew people interested in the S t a te
Univ. It is sponsored by Teacher Corps
and PeaceCorps. and involves gra
tudy oncampus. inner-city teaching
The place to meet
INTERESTING people
BACH CLUB
presents
Live Recorder Music
of Tel1emann, Monteciair.
Hotteterre, Hindemith.
and Handel
MARIANNE MILKS-recorder
ALLEN WARNER-recorder
and baroque flute
JOHN FINK-recorder
Refreshments (Spanish
pastries), etc.afterwards
Thursday, May 13, 8 p.m.
EVERYONE invited. Positively no
musical knwledge needed.
Further info: 761 -3931
IS THIS
YOUR BAG?
LEATHER WINE BAGS
MADE IN SPAIN
Latex Lining Keeps
Your Goodies Fresh
Send S4.OO to
AARHUS
P.O. BOX 35214
HOUSTON, TEX. 77035

study and teaching abroad. Program
available for students with degrees in
math. science, and English as a foreign
lang. Call 764-7460 for an appt.
Ass Arbor area jsbs received recent-
ly, tsr more into, cal our otfice or stop
in.
Ramada Inn, breakfast cook. 5:30 a.m.
to 2:30 p.m., 6 days a week, cook exper.
nec.
M. E. McAllister, independent distri-
butors for AMWAY products in Ohio,
Ind., Mich., and Ill.; dist. and demon-
strate low-phosphate and no-phosphate
bio-degradable prods.; degree in bus.
or acetg. preferred.
Wayne County, Medical Soc, wkr.,
with MSW and 1 yr. exper.; Medical
Soc. Wkr. Supervisor, MSW and at
east 3 yrs. exper. in medical or family
casework.
North Amer. Rockwell, Detroit,
trainee in indust, rel., with degree in
econ. and background in stat., prefer
person severalyers. out of school.
Famnily Servie and Childens Aid,
Jackson, Social Worker to work to de-
velop new program for retarded.

STUDY POLITICS IN
EUROPE THIS SUMMER
and earn 6 credits in Compara-
tive Government while visiting
10 nations in Western Europe
plus East Berlin and Czechoslo-
vakia. Seminars and lectures will
be given by an Oxford-educated
American professor and 70 lead-
ing European statesmen a n d
scholars. Meet with European
students of similar interests at
bolls and other social events.
Write or call Prof. R. L. Schuet-
tinger, Political Science Dept.,
Lynchburg College, Lynchburg,
Virginia 24504
(703) 845-9071, Ext. 348

an original musical by JERRY BILIK
Ann Arbor Civic Theater presents
"THE BRASS
A AND GRASS
-- FOREVER !
May 5-8; May 12-15
Mendelssohn Theatre
TICKETS:
Box Office Open 10-8 Daily Wed. and Thurs.--$3.00
668-6300 Fri. and Sat - $3.50
DIAL OPEN
662-6264 12:45
-At AShows at
St te 1:10-3:45
Liberty 6:15-9 P.M
NOTE SPECIAL
SHOW
TIMES!
HOUTNIAN
BIG MAN
(Panais o echnlicolor *1
* 6TH HIT WEEK
NOW !
Tonight
at P

I!

Budget austerity approved

(Continued from Page 1)
in order to assure funds for
established, high-priority needs.
Most of the new money avail-
able in this year's budget will
be used to finance a nine per
cent salary increase for all city
employes. Norris Thomas (D-
1st ward), City Council's only
black member, charged last
night before the budget's adop-
tion that because some city ad-
ministrators will receive "step"
increases besides the nine per
cent hike, wage increases were
apportioned unfairly:
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Ciass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
lean, 4211 Maynard St., Ann Arbsr,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carried, $5 by mail.

"It still seems the rich a r e
getting richer and the p o o r
poorer," Thomas said. "Not only
are the highest paid getting the
biggest pay increases, but about
half (of those slated for lay-
offs) are from low-income posi-
tions."
Drug grant OK'd
(Continued from Page 1)
able to effectively deal with its
own hard drug problem. The
council, a coalition including
Ozone House, Drug Help, Free
People's clinic, the Ann Arbor
Argus, Trans-love energies, the
Ann Arbor Sun, and Food co-
op, would begin an intensive
street level campaign about hard
drugs as a community problem
through street gatherings and
rock concerts, the underground
media and other parts of the
alternative culture.

JEAN-CLAUDt E HIALY
ESTin A Film by
ERIC ROHMER
SPDELOOiD Color

SANDAIS
CUSTOM FIT

MANY STYLES, ANY DESIGN
$15.00
Mostly Leather
804 S. State, downstairs

PLEASE NOTE DIAL
TIME SCHEDULE! 5-6290
Winnerof 8 BEST PICTURE
BEST ACTOR
ACADEMY AWARDS BEST DIRECTOR
(1JA)IRGiC.S4NYFT/KARLMALDEN IPATiN ON" INMk05s
Shown Daily at 3:30 and 8:45
PLUS
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER M A
BEST SCREENPLAY '

ann arbor film cooperative
PRESENTS
Bryan Forbe's Merry, Mad-cap Macabre Farce
T"E WRON BOmm
Michael Caine, Peter Sellers, Peter Cook, Dudley Moore
tonight May 11-only
"brilliantly -underplayed . . the sureness and richness of the performances
make (it) worth seeing over and over again" -THE NEW/YORKER
"Grave fun" -TIME
"Sellers as a scrofulous sawbones in a chaos of cats .. . signs a death certifi-
cate which he blots with a kitten" -NEWSWEEK
auditorium a 75c
ngellball&9:30children-35c
Next Week-May 1 8-"MY LITTLE CHICKADEE"-w.c. fields, mae west

r!

.1 L

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