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August 19, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-08-19

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T hursday, August 19, 1971

'U' day care center looks for new home

(Continued from Page 3)
At the present time, the day
care center Is more successful
than it has even been in its 14
month history, according to Ross.
It is open nine hours a day, and
employs 2 full-time staff mem-
bers, a teacher and a social
worker, who are in charge of
supervising and planning the ac-
tivities of the children enrolled.
There are now about 50 chil-
dren, between the ages of 2%
and 6 years of age, Ross esti-
mates, who come regularly to the
day care center. Officially, the

center only accepts children of
University students, but accord-
ing to Ross, "It doesn't always
work out that way."
In addition to the fulltime staff
members, paid by the 50 cents
an hour donation made by the
parents of each child, there are
always a variety of work study
people, neighborhood youth corps,
volunteering parents, and stu-
dents working with the children.
Students have the opportunity of
getting University credits in va-
rious education and sociology
courses for their work.

Although the University budget
does not allow for allocation of
funds to the day care center,
some service is still provided.
Maintenance and janitorial work
are done by University employes.
In addition, center organizers
fell heir to a large amount of
toys, tables, chairs, and large
pieces of playground equipment
when the education school closed
its nursery school last year.
t Despite the lack of University
money, the staff of the center
has been able to interest the
children in a wide variety of ac-
tivities which only cost the cen-
ter an estimated $10 per week.
"We never do anything that
will cost much money," says
Ross. "For instance, we've done
tie dying and candlemaking.
One day we showed the kids how
bread is made We try to take
them on field trips at least two
or three times a week, but we
always have parents volunteer
to drive. They're gone to farms,
and airports, they've picked
strawberries and played on
waterbeds."

Despite the apparent success
of the day care center, however,
its reopening in the fall is the
subject of considerable question.
It must vacate Mosher - Jordan
on August 23 in order to make
way for incoming students, and
another place has not yet been
found.
According to housing director
John Feldkamp, "an exhaustive
search is currently being carried
out, but nothing has yet been
turned up. We are having prob-
lems because University build-
ings have not been built with the
needs of preschool children in
mind. Any new location would
have to meet rigid specifications
regarding bathroom facilities,
outdoor play space, health and
safety which are not usually
found in an institution of this
type."
Parents have suggested that a
new building be built, to be used
not only for the day care center
but for more extensive service.
They have suggested plans for
football Saturday babysitting
service and overnight babysit-

ting. But Feldkamp is not en-
thusiastic.
"Such a building would prob-
ablydcost about $60,000," he said.
"I doubt that we could afford
that much."
Although Feldkamp has indi-4
cated that. a failure to turn up
any suitable quarters could
mean the end of the day care
center, parents are confident a
place will be found.
"I don't really expect them to
find anything until about three
days before the start of the new '4
term," says Erlich. "After all,
they certainly never have be-
fore."
Friend of the
CONSUMERS

R.C. Summer Players Presents
SKULL
a play
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
August 19, 20, 21-8 P.M.
R.C. Auditorium--East Quad 75c

ORSON WELLES FILM SOCIETY
SPRING FILM FESTIVAL announces its final summer offerings:

It

THURSDAY
at 5-7-9-11 p.m.
"PUTNEYSWOPE"
The Truth and Soul Movie
"Go see 'Putney Swope'. A pacesetter with outrageous wit, cou-
rageous creativity, guts and intelligence. Tells it like its never been
told before." -Judith Crist, N.B.C.
" 'Putney Swope' is attracting crowds day and night in New York
that are exceeded only by the fans of 'I Am Curious (Yellow)'. But
Downey's trump card isn't sex, it's his refusal to honor the taboos
that Hollywood fastidiously obeys." -Newsweek
"It's all, as 'Mad Comics' would have it, 'humor in the jugular
vein.' It has the raucous truth of a cry from the balcony or the
bleachers. There's vigor in this vulgarity. 'Putney Swope' is a kind
of 'Laugh-In' for adults." -Richard Schickel, Life Magazine

FRIDAY
at 7:30 & 10:00 p.m.
When in Southern California visit Universal City Studios
There were five Generals inside
and one Private outside...
The problemi was to get the five
Generals inside- outside..
and avoid getting waylaid by a
beautiful countess!
NEWMAN,
ItitY
IRIGc
TECHNICOLOR'
SYLVA KOSOINA
TOM BOS[EY'ANDREWY DUGANJOWIDRN " S HER P[1[RSwIAMES GREGORY
Screenplay by PETER STONE and FRANK TAR OFF - Story by FRANK TAR OFF- Directed by JACK SMIGHT
Asociaie ProduerPETER STONE ProducedbyHAECHESTER-AnAinCorp. Production A UNIVERSALPICTURE
EXTRA ADDED ATTRACTION
"THE OLD MAN AND
THE DEVIL"
filmed entirely in Ann Arbor,
shown with each show both nights.

tr

MANY THANKS TO OUR FRIENDS WHOSE HELP MADE POSSIBLE THE SUCCESS OF OUR SUMMER SERIES.
WATCH FOR US IN THE FALL WHEN WE SHALL BE PLEASED TO BRING YOU:

Bananas Funny Girl
Beyond the Valley of the Doabs Getting Straight
Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice Gone With The Wind.
Borsalino The Great White Hope
Butch Cassidy & the Joe
Sundance Kid The Lion in Winter
Catch-22 Little Fauss & Big Halsy

Little Murders The Owl and the Pussycat
Lovers and Other Strangers Patton
M*A*S* H Putney Swope
Monterrey Pop Take the Money and Run
Move Where's Poppa

Oliver!
Othello

Woodstock

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