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August 18, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-08-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MiCHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, August 18, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, August I 8, 1971

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Daily Classifieds Get Results

Labor told no strikes during freeze

(Continuedefrom Page 3)i
"The President said this is a
voluntary wage and price
freeze, and we're not volun-
teering," she said
Counts acknowledged t h a t
"there is going to be resistance
from both sides to continuing
negotiations during the freeze,"
but said that federal mediators
would work to persuade work-
ers not to strike, and continue
negotiating during the 90-day
period.
Asked how long the admin-
istration might wait for volun-
tary cooperation before deter-
mining whether to try forcibly
halting strikes, Counts s a i d,
"that isn't too long a period."
Counts told a news confer-
ence the administration believ-
es it has the legal authority un-
der the law authorizing t h e
wage-price freeze to order all
strikers back to work for the
90 days, but prefers voluntary
cooperation.
"We are not holding a club
over them," Counts said b u t
added he was not ruling out the
possibility of mandatory back-
to-work orders for union work-
ers who refuse to do so volun-
tarily.
He said some 150,000 work-
ers currently are involved in
363 strikes, including the walk-
out of dockworkers that has
paralyzed West Coast shipping
for weeks,
Others now on strike include
New York Telephone workers
and a number of workers in
steel-fabricating and r u b b e r-
manufacturing plants.
Also during the freeze per-
iod, some 80,000 bituminous
coal miners are scheduled for
strike Sept. 30 if they don't
get a new contract and many
of the contracts affecting more

than 200,000 aerospace-and air-
line workers are set to expire.
Counts said he believes the
$5,000 fine for each instance of
price-freeze violations in Nix-
on's order could also be applied
to striking unions if the ad-
ministration decided to forci-
bly halt a walkout.
Meanwhile, leaders of un-
ions representing 500,000
teachers in 16 states recom-
mended today that while local
groups should adhere to Presi-
dent Nixon's wage and p r i c e
freeze order, they will seek ex-
emption for teachers.
Dr. Curtis Plott, executive
secretary of the Illinois Educa-
tion Association, said the
teachers will attempt to seek
exemptions to the President's
order because. he "failed to re-
cognize the seasonal nature of
teacher employment.",
Plott added "The President's
guidelines impose da blatant in-
Swiss hanks
(Continied from Pae 3)
West Europeans speculate
along these lines:
Nixon cut the dollar's ties to
gold'in an effort to force Japan
and some West European coun-
tries - such as west Germany,
Switzerland and the Nether-
lands - to let the value of
their currencies float up in re-
lation to the dollar.
This would make exports
from these countries more ex-
pensive in dollar terms and
slow the flood of their goods in-
to the United States. It would
also permit U.S. exports to
competa on more even terms in
world markets.

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justice on the nation's two mil-
lion teachers . . Nixon con-
veniently issued his order only
after the nation's major indus-
tries and unions reached t h e
largest settlements in recent
years."
Plott said the President's
guidelines will inhibit negotia-
tions and he said the 116 unset-
tled school districts in Illinois
have already been notified by
the Illinois School Board As-
sociation that there will be no
further negotiations on eco-
nomic proposals as a result of
Nixon's order.
"There may be many strikes
if school boards refuse to ne-
gotiate," Plott said.
The presidential lockup on
wages also is affecting thous-
ands of state and municipal
employes across, the nation,
with many government officials
unsure of their status under
the freeze.
float dollar
Japanese leaders stated for-
msally yesterday they would re-
sist Nixon's moves. They s a i d
Japan had no intention of in-
creasing the value of its mon-
ey and would continue to peg
the yen to the dollar at the pre
sent level.
If the Japanese maintain the
yen at its present level while
European currencies rise in val-
ue, the yen would in effect, be
devalued in Europe.
Japan's already cheap goods
-would become even cheaper.
West European goods would be
driven out of their own mark-
ets.
Paul Volcker, U.S. undersec-
retary of the Treasury, mean-
while, wound up his two-day
visit to London and Paris to
explain Nixon's new monetary
policies.
Int Paris ht' cotferred w i t h
nance Minister Valery is-
card d'Estaing and then with
Edwin Stopper, president of the
Swiss National Bank. He
would up by a meeting w i t h
Enile Van Lennup, secretary-
general of the Organization for
European Economic Coopera-
tion and Development.
Before boarding a plane f o r
Washington, Volcker told
newsmen: "The dollar is
healthier today than it was at
the weekend."
RIGHT ON! "is funny and
murderous . .. is about
making love and war...
about raising the wind
... Visually spectacular!"
-New Yorker Meg.
"REVOLUTIONARY
REVELATION!"
-Imamu Baraka (Leroi Jones)
RIGHT ON! "makes clear
there are ways to be in
prison without once being
behind bars. Lacerating
defiance." -Time Magazine
"Passion, Power and
Daring Fused Into
Beauty." --cinema 70
RIGHT ON! "is a total
triumph! Must be seen by
all the brothers & sisters."
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"GUERRILLA DRAMA
of street gangs,
junkies, soul music,
hustlers
and, Revo-
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NY Daily New'
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4

#I

A /LIJ B ('lssM mr' Brw I d I
A film by Bruce ('Endless Summer') Brown Rated EG

I

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