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August 06, 1971 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-08-06

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M4 Sir4 igau &tity
Vol LXXXI, No 62 S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Friday, August 6, 1971 Ten Cents Eight Pages
State changes
V guidelines on
college funds

Obscenity a touchy subject
Police move in to clear demonstrators out of the precincts of the Old Bailey jail in
two hours of protest yesterday. Demonstrations followed the passing of prison senten
leaders of Britain's hippie underground for publishing an obscene magazine written by s
FULL REPORT EXPECTED:
Panel urges faculty caut4

By ALAN LENHOFI
Although the Legislature has not yet finalized the
University's appropriation for the current fiscal year, Uni-
versity officials ,have already received discouraging news
about next year's general fund allocation from the state.
In a letter sent to all state colleges, John Dempsey,
director of the Governor's budget bureau, has announced
that appropriation requests from the colleges for fiscal
1972-73-due Sept. 24,-will re required to include re-
sponses to a number of newly adopted policies designed
to save money and possibly avert further tax increases.
Among the new policies is one
that wold serve to level off un-
dergraduate enrollment in the
state's larger universities while
placing greater emphasis on ex-
pansion of graduate programs.
Specifically, the letter mentions
the expansion of medical educa- p t off b u t
tion as a top priority.
-Associated Press In addition, the budget bureau
is seeking to "minimize or elimi- io tt 0
nate general fond support for erLI
London after activities which can and should
aces on three be funded by direct user charges. WASHINGTON (') - Men born
Included in this category are
chool children. such activities as inter-collegiate Dec. 4, Jan. 25 .15,
athletics, parking, bus transpor- 1952 were assigned Nos. 5, 2 and
Catonhelthsevicsalumni 3 respectively in yesterday's
tation health srvices, u drafte lottery to headetherdine
activities, bookstore, university datlteyt edteln
press, dormitory advising," and facing- possible call to military
other services. service next year.
~ Although the President's so-
in "Whilermost of these activities thority to draft men expired June
are worthwhile, the 1 e t t e r 30, the lottery for next year's
states, "competition for public callup was held because the law
funds dictates that they have a governing it remains in effect.
JP t lower priority than those activi- Meanwhile tse Senate yester-
ipts ::h
ties which are closer to the es-
sence of high education objec-
ady built up to es." See Page 2 for a complete list
tage in other The letter also stresses that of birthdates and their corres-
e requests for new and expanded ponding draft lottery numbers.
I faculty mem- programs be accompanied by
ning election proposals for reallocation of day put off until Sept. 13 con-
yie support of funds from existing programs sideration of a two-year draft
agency until "as a means of partially fund- bill that calls for a negotiated
a clear under- ing them. deadline on U.S. withdrawal
ituation at the Response to each policy But Senate Democratic Leader
should be in narrative form, con- Mike Mansfield said that dec-
round the coun cise and specific. Vague generali- laration was no substitute for his
around the ties, lengthy exhortations and amendment to declare as U.S.
d to collective warnings of disaster should be policy a nine month deadline on
inted themsel- avoided," the letter advises, troop withdrawal, p r o v i d e d
ossibilities and "It may not be as bad as it American prisoners of war are
ive bargaining See STATE, Page freed.

t
i
E

collective barganing

By JIM IRWIN
The Senate Assembly com-
inittee studying the possibilities
of collective bargaining or alter-
native methods for the faculty
to "more decisively affect Uni-
versity of Michigan financial
and organizational policies" has
urged University faculty mem-
bers to be cautious about tak-

ing active steps towards insti-
tuting faculty collective b a r -
gaining at the present time.
In a communication recently
sent to the faculty, the Com-
mittee on the Rights and Re-
sponsibilities of Faculty M e m-
bers, 1971, stated that "well-
financed efforts toward organ-
ized (faculty) collective bar-

atten
gaining have alre
an advanced s
parts of the Stat
They cautioned
hers against si
cards for tentat
any bargaining
they had gained
standing of the s
University and a
University and
country in regar
bargaining, acqua
ves with the pt
limits of collect:

Court turns down
presi entia eandidaey
SAIGON (A') - South Viet-
nam's Supreme Court yesterday
disqualified Vice President
Nguyen Cao Ky as a candidate
in the presidential elections,
narrowing the field to President
Nguyen Van Thieu and tetired
Gen. Duong Van "Big" Minh.
The court ruled Ky failed to
pualify because 39 of his 102
endorsements duplicated those
already given to Thieu, and thus
were invalid. Ky needed 100 to
gain a place on the ballot for
the Oct. 3 election.
Shortly after being notified of
the court's ruling, Ky said he
had made -no decision as to
what action he would take next.
Under the election law Ky
can appeal the court's decision
within the next eight days.
Such an appeal would be ruled
on by the full nine-member Nguyen Cao Ky
court within seven days a f t e r
that. The final list of candi- presidential race and leave
dates - to which there is no Thieu as the sole candidate.
challenge - will be posted Aug. In a statement issued by his
24. press secretary, Minh said re-
Ky has charged that Thieu ports from the countryside
coerced province and city coun- showed that his campaign
cilmen to sign blank forms even workers "have been kept under
before the election law was surveillance and terrorized."
promulgated or Thieu declared The U.S. Embassy is known
his candidacy, and' that t h e s e to be worried that Minh might
endorsements are therefore 11- pull out and turn the election
legal. into what one American official
Meanwhile, Minh repeated a yesterday called a "colossal
threat to withdraw from t he farce,"

and of various bargaining agen-
cies. and considered local alter-
natives to formal colective bar-
gaining.
The committee exoects to
make a full report and f i n a 1
recommendations on collective
bargaining in September.
Faculty unioniation, tradi-
tionally scorned by cllee pro-
fessors as a means to "nip now-
er, has been an isue of widen-
ing interest at the University
during the past year.
A poll taken by the local chap-
ter of the American Association
of University Professors
of U n i v e r s i t y Professors
(AAUP) last January showed
considerable faculty interest in
the possibilities of collective
bargaining and yet some reser-
vations.
According to Prof. Wilbert
McKeachie, at that time pres-
ident of AAUP, comments writ-
ten on questionnaires indicated
that there Were "quite a num-
ber of faculty who feel that
collective bargaining would de-
stroy the concept of the aca-
demic community."
In response to local interest
in collective bargaining, a sym-
posium will be presented on
September 17 and 18 in the
Michigan League Ballroom by
the Institute of Continuing Le-
gal Education to discuss "fast-
moving recent developments,
legal questions and practical
problems of collective bargain-
ing for professionals on c a m-
puses."

New sales technique
This coffee advertisement which has appeared in Sweden is a
phony, say owners of the Gevalia coffee company for which it ap-
peared. The picture, however, is not-with one small exception.
The hand is that of a swedish blosde who originally modelled for
the ad. A poster artist says he copied an official Nixon portrait
from the U.S. Embassy and coupled it with part of a Gevalia
coffee ad.

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