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August 05, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-08-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

roge Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, August. 5, 1971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, August 5, ~97l

L olc es BIG TEN COMMISSIONER:
I-j1l0chstrikes out1 l-A g

!,At "

as Tigers
DETROIT - Mickey Lolich Cubs,
struck out 14 and scattered sev-
en hits, leading the Detroit Tig- CHIC
ers to a 2-1 triumph over the double
Washington Senators last night. backed
Lolich, 17-8, was locked in a pas an
pitching duel with Dick Bosman, to a 3
9-12, who only allowed four hits, Diego I
when Al Kaline knocked in the The
winning run with a third-inn- tary w
ing home run. game
Kaline, who started at first darkne
base for the first time this sea- resume
son, also tripled to pace the Ti- with th
ger offense. they hu
Willie Horton singled home Pepit
the first run after Kaline's tri- the sect
ple in the third, Kaline homer- larly s
ed into the lower deck in left doubled
field, his 10th of the year. 1-7, an
Cleo Ja
Major League Redss
h" NEW
Standings double
to avert
AMERICAN LEAGUE forman
East Gentry
W L Pt. GB Reds to
Baltimore 66 39 .629 --- Mets y
Boston 62 46 .74 5 eSy
Detroit 58 50 .537 91/ Genti
New York 55 56 .495 14 strongl
Washington 44 63 .411 23 strikeou
West WaadsoW
Oakland 68 39 .636 -- eighth
Kansas City 53 52 .505 14 eih,
California 53 58 .477 17 sacrific
Chicago 50 58 .477 17 ose us
Minnesota 49 50 .4819 tathi
Milwaukee 46 61 .430 2 that hi
Yesterday's Results center
Baltimore 5, Boston 4 (first)
10 innings
Boston at Baltimore(slecond game) o
postponed, rain BALI
New York 7, Cleyeland 3 mound's
tDetrot 2, Washington 1
Chicago at California, Inc. fourth
Kansas City 2, Minnesota 1 (first) home E
Minnesota at Kansas City (second as the
game (Inc.) IYy
Milwaukee at Oakland, inc. victory
Today's Games Sx in
Detroit at Boston, night duled
Cleveland at Washington, night last nig
Baltimore at New York, night
Minnesota at Kansas City, night Thes
Milwaukee at Oakland, night out aft
Chicago at California, night --
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East0
W 1LPet GB
Pittsburgh 68 42 .618 --- V
St. Louis 60 50 .545 8
Chicago 59 50 .541 8%
New York 55 53 .59 1
Philadelphia 49 62 .436 20
Montreal 44 66 .400 24
West
San Francisco 67 46 .593-- B
Los Angeles 59 52 .532 7
Atanta 58 56 .509 9y udt
Houston 5 54 .09 O9%
Ho"sn : !E a audit
Cincinnati 52 62 .456 15:
San Diego 40 73 .354 27 Sat.
Yesterday's Results St
Montreal 4, Pittsburgh 3, 11 innings,
Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 3 ann
Cincinnati1, New York 0
Houston 2, Los Angeles 0 --
Chicago 6, San Diego 4, 1st game
Chicago 3, San Diego 0, second
St. Louis 7, San Francisco 2
Today's Games
San Diego at Chicago
New York at Atlanta, night
Pittsburgh at Montreal, nightt/
Los Angeles at Houston, night
San Francisco at St. Louis, night
boo es t 'b01,
'it°

tritrnx
click
AGO - Joe Pepitone's
and run-scoring single
the pitching of Milt pap-
d led the Chicago Cubs
-0 victory over the San
Padres yesterday.
Cubs also recorded a vic-
hen they completed a
suspended because of
ss May 16. The game was
d in the seventh inning
he Cubs leading 6-3 and
tng on for a 6-4 triumph.
one got things going in
ond inning of the regu-
cheduled game when he
off loser Fred Norman,
d scored on a single by
mes,
squeak
YORK -- Pete Rose's
scored Woody Woodward
come an 11-strikeout per-
ce by New York's Gary
and led the Cincinnati
a 1-0 triumh over the
esterday.
ry, 9-9, had been pitching
y towards a career high
it total when he walked
!ard leading off the
After Gary Nolan had
ed Woodward to second,
nloaded with a line drive
t off the fence in right
field.
es comeback
17IMORE - Merv Betten-
10th inning single - his
hit of the game-chased
Baltimore's winning run
Orioles rallied for a 5-4
over the Boston Red
the first game of a sche-
twi-night doubleheader
ht.
second game was rained
er 11/2 innings.
David Hemmings
'anessa Redgrave
Sarah Miles
ANTON ION I'S
LOW-UP
orium a-angell hall
Aug. 7 only-7 & 9:30
arbor film cooperative

iph
Mark Belanger was hit by a
pitch to open the 10th and was
sacrificed to second by winning
pitcher Pete Richart. After Don
Buford was intentionally walk-
ed, the runners pulled a double
steal. Then Rettenmund singled
to center for the victory.
Yankees sweep
CLEVELAND - Roy White
slammed a two-run homer and
Danny Cater drove in three
runs without a hit as the New
York Yankees defeated the Cle-
veland Indians 7-3 last night to
sweep their three-game series.
White staked Stan Bahnsen,
10-8, to a 2-0 lead in the first
with a two-run homer. Cater
boosted the margin, driving in
a run with a groundout after
Ray Lamb, 5-10, walked Bobby
Murcer and White in the fourth.
Graig Nettles slammed his
20th homer to trim the lead to
3-1 in the bottom of the inn-
ing but the Yankees pounced on
reliever Alan Foster for two
more in the sixth on just one
hit.
Dodgyers downed
HOUSTON - Rookie Ken
Forsch silenced Los Angeles on
four hits last night, outdueling
veteran Al Downing as the
Houston Astros blanked the
Dodgers 2-0.
Forsch, 6-5, had lost four
straight games and hadn't won
since beating Cincinnati 6-1 on
July 4th. Against the Dodgers,
the tall right-hander walked
three and struck out nine.
Forsch and Downing, 13-7,
battled on even terms until the
sixth when the Astros scored
EARLY SHOW TONIGHT!
"RIALY COMICI YOU SHOULD
CERTAINLY SEE ITI"-a.Y.Ti..
'1 .0L91V~i$ ARTISTS
at 8:30
TA E TE' E
pt 7:00 p.m.
AUD. A-ANGELL
SUMMER FILM FESTIVAL
Orson Welles

Duke to get ostfon

i

CHICAGO ( P) - Wayne Duke,
commissioner of the Big Eight,
will be named Big Ten Confer-
ence commissioner, succeeding
the late Bill Reed, the Associated
Press learned yesterday.
Official announcement of the
appointment is expected today.
Selection of a successor to
Reed, who died May 20, report-
edly centered on Duke and
Jack Fuzak, 56, Michigan State
faculty representative.
Duke, 42, former administra-
tive assistant with the NCAA be-
fore joining the Big Eight, was
highly recommended by Big Ten
athletic directors. Reportedly
they endorsed him 9-1 in a straw
vote.
Big Ten Presidents deter-
mined the selection at a hush-
hush meeting in Chicago Mon-
day.
The Big Eight, under Duke's
commissionship since 1962, has
grown into one of the nation's
top football powers.
Nebraska won the 1970 national
championship.
At Big Eight headquarters in
Kansas City, Mickey Holmes,
Duke's assistant, said the com-
missioner was vacationing in
the mountains of Colorado and
could not be reached.
Holmes said the news was a

surprise to him because after
several conversations with Duke
on the matter "I've grown rath-
er optimistic he wouldn't ac-
cept." the Big Ten post.
A conference spokesman said
no machinery had been set up
to name a successor if Duke
gets the Big Ten post.
Duke was graduated from the
State University of Iowa at
Iowa City in 1950. He was sports
information director at the Uni-
versity of Northern Iowa at Ce-
dar Falls and the University of
Colorado before joining the
NCAA executive staff when it
was organized in Kansas City in
1952.
While with the NCAA, Duke
was involved in nearly every
phase of association activity,
including an assignment with
.NBC - TV Sports in New York in
1957 as NCAA - NBC television
public relations - liaison officer.
Duke is a member of the
NCAA executive, legislative,
football television and football
advancement committees and an
NCAA representative of the gov-
erning council of the U.S. Track
and Field Federation.
He is also the vice president
of the collegiate commissioners
association.

$

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