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August 05, 1971 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-08-05

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Pag Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, August 5, 197-1

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, August 5, 1971

Daily Classifeds

Drivers stop at Buhr picket line

(Continued from Page 7)
PERSONAL
DON'T MISS The Pawnbroker coming
Aug. 13-14 at 9 p.m at the Newman
Center basement, donation $1. 27F68
BUMPER STICKERS custom printed
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GOODNIGHT, sleep tight, don't let
your mattress bite.& r
Love, Tutu & Harey
eFtc
HOT PANTS make any waterbed
simmer.
Love, Tom & Harry
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WEDDING INVITATIONS-Mod or Tra-
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Free Marriage Certificate with order:
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BL0W-UP
auditorium a-angel! hal
SAT., AUG. 7
7 & 9:30 p.m.
ann arbor film cooperative

PERSONAL
WANTED-BASS player for established
dance band. 483-4653. 74F63
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(Continued from Page 1)
lives or safety are endangered.
The Teamsters local to which
the truck-drivers belong was
called in order to see what the
union position on the matter was,
and the drivers were instructed
to drive in unless they were
afraid to do so.
The drivers decided not to
drive in, so both police and the
drivers left with the machinery
still remaining inside the Buhr
plant. When asked why he did
not try to drive through the gate,
one truck-driver replied, "I
don't want to cause any violence
or endanger my life,"
GM was able to obtain the in-
junction to move the machinery
because it is technically their
property.
Washtenaw C o u n t y Sheriff
Douglas Harvey was at the
scene yesterday along with sev-
eral Ann Arbor police. Two law-
yers for GM watched the picket-
ing from across the street, and
tried to convince the drivers to
enter the plant but they refused,
to comment on the events.
Although it is likely that GM
will continue to send trucks to
pick up the machinery, officials

at Hydromatic were unavailable
for comment on the situation
yesterday. GM is anxious to ob-
tain the machinery because it is
essential to automobile model
changeover.
One Union member estimated
the value of the machinery at
about $1.5 million. while com-
pany sources were unavailable
for comment.
Later in the afternoon, strikers
kept what they think were serv-
ice parts from being taken out
of the plant in two company cars
according to observers. The strik-
ers saw boxes being placed in
the two cars, and refused to al-
low the vehicles to leave the
plant before seeing what they
contained.
The driver of the first car
would not let the picketers look
inside the trunk, and an Ann Ar-
bor policeman who union officials
say was called to the scene by
the company told the strikers
they would have to allow the car
to leave. .
However, the policeman ap-
parently called headquarters and
was told that the strikers would
only have to allow workers at
the plant to leave, and could de-

s

iI

"'FORTUNE AND MEN'S EYES'
IS ONE OF THE BEST
FILMS TO COME OUT
THIS YEAR !"
- John Crittendeh, Bergen Record
"'FORTUNE AND MEN'S EYES'
IS A POWERFUL,
EFFECTIVE RETELLING
OF THE CLASSIC
PRISON TALE!"
-Stanley Newman, Cue Magazine
"NOT TO BE MISSED!
Anyone in society today should force him-
self to see it. It's a responsibility we have
to open our eyes as to how our prisoners
are degraded. 'Fortune' is a film of terror,
or a society defeating itself, on purpose
and of cruelty. It's a compelling look at
the one part of society continually neg-
lected and forgotten."
Jeff Lyons WPIX-TV
"CA POWERFUL AND
EFFECTIVE RETELLING OF
THE CLASSIC PRISON TALE.
The action is brutal. Paced well...
the film holds and interests
throughout. The performances are
sure and convincing."
--Stanley Newman, Cue Magazine
What goeson in prison is a crime.
FORTUNE

I

City fights court order.

(Continuedlfrom Page 3)
money," as a result of being
prohibited from putting up new
signs.
A Central spokesman however,
said yesterday that Central has
no desire to erect new signs prior
DAL 8-64 1 6 F
TONIGHT AT 7 :15 - 9 P.M.
YOU MUST BE 18 OR OLDER
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to the Sept. 13, hearing. Rather,
he explained, the company would
like to negotiate with the city
for amendments to be added to
the ofdinance.
Those negotiations are expect-
ed to begin tomorrow.
Girls join in
(ContinuedfromPage 3)
"We did have to make allow-
ances for them on the teams,"
says basketball coach Johnny
Orr. "When you're playing
shirts against the skins, you
can't very well have a girl
playing on the skins team."
Similar problems arose when
the students were taught to cen-
ter a football. "'We had to team
two girls together," says Ann
Arbor Recreation leader Bill
Hardy, "to eliminate Uhat touch-
ing problem."
But the girls did not Seem to
mind the fact that they 'iad be-
come such a controversial topic,
and kept coming. back for each
new event. Attendance :tnged
from 25 girls per day at the foot-
ball clinics to 100 per day at the
gymnastics clinics. No girls were
brave enough, however, to at-
tempt to learn wrestling.
Despite the admission of girl;
into the program, PROBE mem-
bers are still not completely sat-
isfied with the results. "permis-
sion for girls to take part was
never popularly publicized as
RE
-JAMES V

tain a car carrying material
manufactured at the plant.
The cars drove back to the
building, and apparently unload-
ed whatever material had been
placed in them.
When the cars tried to leave
the plant again, they were once
more stopped by the picketers.
This time, the drivers agreed to
let strikers search the cars, and
no parts were in the car at that
time.
Negotiations are scheduled for
today between Bendix and the
strikers, but a settlement of the
strike is doubtful.
Daneers' at
Mendelssohn
(Continued from Page 5)
A GUIDE FOR EVERYONE
"Ghost Dancers" serves as an
illustration of excellent acting
and direction. The technical as-
pects of the production are well
coordinated and make their
own thematic and dramatic
statements.
All of the actors-- N i c k
LaTour, Stephen Wyman, Ros-
lyn Abrams and Cecilia Phelan,
conveyed the depth in "Ghost
Dancers" through the subtty
and honest reality in their in-
teractions with each other.
Special congratulations must be
given to hPelan and particular-
ly Abrams.
This is certainly the finest
production of the University
Players summer season.
city athletics
was promised," claimed one
PROBE member.
Other members of PROBE re-
ported what they called discrimi-
natory practices employed by
the coaches, including what they
claimed was an almost total lack
of interest in the progress of
girls in favor of supervising the
boys. "The girls could have been
running backwards for all they
knew," says one.
The coaching staff of the clinic
unilaterally deny all charges of
sex discrimination.
"We just view the change as
something which allows more
kids to attend the program,"
says Hardy. "We don't look upon
them as boys or girls. They're
just kids who get the opportunity
to learn something worthwhile
in athletics."
But most of the girls partici-
pating in the program seem to be
unconcerned with such esoteric
matters as sex discrimination.
"It's true that the boys don't
really look upon us as athletic
equals," said a thirteen year old
girl. "But maybe that's because
we're so lousy"
EAD
VECHSLER-
in

:

STEREO VISION

,

aAN
The School of Music and Department of Art present
MEN'SSSN'
EA 117. 1The BrberOPER
Y (IN ENGLISH)
"HONORS GO TO MICHAEL GREER AUGUST 13, 14, 16 and 17-8 P.M.
as the uninhibited homosexual who MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
is fascinatingly funny and campy
in a larger-than-life role." $1.50 & $3.00
--A. H. Weer,N.Y. Times Conductor Josef Blatt Stage Director: Ralph Herbert
TICKET INFORMATION: 764-6118
ROHNN TY Thurs. 7 :1 0 . 9 (MAIL ORDERS: School of Music Opera, Mendelssohn Theatre,
Fri 7 :10 * 9 * 11 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
INFORMATION 761-9700 Please enclose self-addressed, starped envelope

t

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