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July 24, 1971 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-07-24

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

oaturday, July 24, 1971

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, July 24, 1971

STARTS TONIGHT!
n
IS,QUITE SIMPLY,
THE BEST AMERICAN FILM
?I en . "Y. TIMES
I'VE SEEN THIS YEAR!";~y
A MIKENICHOLS FILM
ALAN ARKIN
sw
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MASISHUN JONVM OGl&RSON WELlES ASORE10 SCR [5541Y816 51051 P50itit5YOlJttNi0itS ARi1NRAN$OMOt
-ALSO--

arts festival
A definition: Street fair vs. art

"COMPLETELY
FASCINATING
TO WATC H !
TOTAL ENTER-
TAI NMENT!
Redford is
nothing short
of stunning!"
Liz Smith, Cosmopoton

"A REAL
THRILLER!
Robert Redford
takes another
giant step forward
as the most
exciting leading
man since
talkies!'
Vernon Scott, U.P.I

By LARRY ADELSON
Trying to assess the Art Fair.
you run into the problem of
choosing the proper grounds on
which to judge it. On the one
hand you have the Ann Arbor
Street Art Fair, an event, or-
ganized and run with a great deal
of sophistication and profession-
alism. As art fairs go it is quite
good in terms of the quality of the
organization and the exhibitors
and in .terms of the volume of
sales. For all of this the organiz-
ers should be commended. There
are also a good number of ex-
cellent craftsmen at the fair. A
handful of jeweler/metalsmiths,
a larger number of ceramists,
some assorted others, and even
a few of the artists prove, every
year to be skillful both at design-
ing and at crafting their wares.
These too should be commended,
these are the people to whom the
Fair should rightfully belong.
On the other hand, the 'art' was
bad. There is no way of getting
around this fact short of ignor-
ing the issue. Well done and pro-
fessional can be said for it. De-
rivative, slick. and commercial
can also be said for it. Art it is
absolutely not. These are pictures
which can be fathomed on the
way from one clothing sale to the
next. That is how long it takes
for them to say all that they have
to say and they won't show you
anything more if you look at them
until doomsday. These are the
bare bones of works of art, strip-
ped of the essence which makes
works of art. They look like art
because they are based on works
of art. They have some stylisite
reference to that which we are
exposed to as being works of
art and therefore have the cachet
of art. They even get a little bit
of response from you, but they
The MichiganDaily, edited and can-
aged hy students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Ctass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
gan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arboe,
Michigan 48104, Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.

still are not art. Artists strug-
gle to produce forms which are
in some way new, which con-
tribcte to ways of seeing both
art and non-art, which extend
human horizons. While real art
may fall into schools, and while
the individual artist's works may
carry a continuity, they have a
meaning beyond that member-
ship because they create the
definition of that membership.
The same cannot be said for the
Art Fair art which has no exist-
ence as a reference to the fact
that Abstract-Expressionism or
Andrew Wyeth exist.
But why rail against it? It is
(if you judge by sales and com-
ments in the booths) what people
like. Is it really such an evil?
Don't these 'real artists' have the
opportunity to apply too?
The reason for being dissatis-
fied with the Fair instead of rid-
ing along with it is because it
represents an immense effort
which is put into boosting lousy
art and even worse, perpetuating
a damaging attitude towards cul-
ture. Large amounts of time
and money are expended to publi-
cize and incentives (sales) are
offered to draw people.
Art becomes something that is
arranged for you and which you
are enticed into seeing. If you
have any fantasies about art at-
tracting anyone to the fair, I sug-
gest that you step into one of
the art galleries or the museum.
No, the fair is fun and art can
be seen enpassant, you can do
your part to be cultured and get
it over with once a year (300
artists, after all!). Yes, and peo-
ple like. Yes, and YOU (dear

reader like it because this is the
same attitude about art that you
find when hundreds of thous-
ands of dollars are spent to hype
some rock star and you know that
Big Mama Thornton and Son
House are better but there you
are at the record counter and
the $3.49 is going for that James
Taylor or that Led Zepplin and
there you are at the Fillmore
and you don't even know who El-
vin Jones is who is playing in
that same town at some bar that
night and there you are at Goose
Lake and you can't even see the
band while the Ann Arbor Blues
Festival is grooving its way into
poverty on that very weekend.
And there you are at the Art
Fair and you will not go to the
museum or the galleries and you
think that Peter Max is contem-
porary art and Ranauschenberg,
Smithson, and Caro could be
greengrocers for all you know or
care.
Art is fun for Godsake, it is
much more than just "good for
you" and it is alive and going on
all around you. But it just is not
going to be handed to you on a
silver platter. You are going to
have to go to it and give some
time.
So this is why I do not like the
Art Fair. Not because the works
are not 'great'. I do not begrudge
people their desire to paint. It is
because this time and effort
and attention and money is spent
not in addition to, but instead of,
being spent to encourage and
support the people who are now
creating the art which will be
copied and sold in the genera-
tions of art fairs to come.

PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENT$S
ROB4RT ADFORD mICHAELJ.POLLARD
UTTL4 FAUSS AnD BIG HALSY
AN ALBERT S. RUDDY PRODUCTION
if mPANAS o tla 60M8VE AAPARAMOUNTI'
POFTHP OrUm "Catch 22" 6:30 0 10:45
DOWNT~ON5NN^04101 IFauss & Halsy"9 PM.
SUPERPANAvISlON TECHNNCOLOR nI
OPEN 2 P.M. SHOWN 2:30 OVER 5 P.M.

Festival schedule

tSsummer Session published Tuesday
Daily Classifieds Get Resultsio hSatrdby carnee. S symi-
the ann arbor film cooperative presents
THE HAIR-RAISING HEART-STOPPING SUSPENSE SHOCKER
TA L
with Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin, and Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.
- TONIGHT! JULY 24 ONLY! -
EXTRA ADDED ATTRACTION-Road Runner Cartoon
auditorium a all-color 7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
angell hail program still only 75c
COMING TUESDAY-Warren Beatty in KALEIDOSCOPE

The Second Ann Arbor Medi-
eval Festival is scheduled to take
place the weekend of July 31
at four outdoor locations in Ann
Arbor. The festival will consist
of two 15th century plays, a
French comedy, The Farce of
Master Peter Pathelin, and an
English miracte play, the Wake-
field Play of Noah, both directed
by Charles Rosenberg; three
medieval court dances, led by
Susan Hitchcock; and a selection
of songs from Adriano Ban-
chieri's Festino, an early 17th
century Italian madrigalacomedy,
performed by the Collegium Mu-
sicum of the University of Michi-
gan, and conducted by Prof.
Thomas Taylor.
The complete Festino will be
performed twice the following
week at the University of Michi-
gpo School of Music. (For fur-
ther information contact the
School of Music.) The festival
will be performed as follows:
Sat., July 31, 10:00 a.m. at West
Park, and 2:00 p.m. at Burns
Park; Sun., Aug. 1, 10:30 a.m. at
Northside School (Pontiac Arail
and Barton Hills Drive) and
2:30 p.m. in the University Ar-

boretum, which is closed to all
motorized vehicles. The entire
program will be performed at
each site. In the event of rain
either on both days or only on
Sunday, the entire program will
be performed the following Sun-
day.
W"1YI BKM
o KEEP
AMENR CiBSON
Because it's my
country. And it's
getting dirty.
Thai's why.
* -
Keep America Clean.
Keep America Beautiful.
Advertisingcontributed
for the public good.
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A

POSITIVE LAST TIMES SUNDAY NIGHT!
APPLE FILMSrents a KING FEATURES eo an ow you can SEE
jIbet P 8e tle anything you want
REAURST"
UntedArtists starring ARD GUTHRIE
~~~COLOR by Deluxe United Artists . .
AT 7:00 &11 :00 P.M. AT 5:00&9:00P.M
Show times
AUDITORIUM A Tickets for all reserved seats go
Yellow Sub at 7:00 & 1 1 :00
ANGELL HALL Alice's Rest. at 5:00 & 9:00 on sale at 4:00 p.m. Sunday.
ORSON WELLES SUMMER FILM FESTIVAL

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