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July 23, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-07-23

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page three

REPETITIVE
High-s5
Low-60
cloudy, possibility
of thunderstorms

Friday, July 23, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan News Phone: 764-0552
RIP members vote
7to back Buhr strike

Anry port in a storm
A Palestinian guerrilla, wounded in both legs, is bandaged by Israeli
troops after crossing the border into Israeli occupied Jordan. lie
claimed to have been shot by Jordanian troops during a military
crackdown on guerrilla activities in that country.
Ine ws fbriefs
By The Associated Press
SEVENTEEN DEMOCRATIC CONGRESSMEN announced
yesterday they will conduct open hearings on the Pentagon
papers next week.
The purpose of the hearings, according to Rep. John Dow
(D-NY) is to "highlight the turning points in U.S. policy" by
interpreting the documents and what they reveal about the inner
workings of the government.
Dow said 13 witnesses have already accepted invitations to
appear and others-including Daniel Ellsburg (the man who leaked
the documents to the press)-are expected to appear.
THE UNITED TRANSPORTATION UNION and the Chi-
cago and Northwestern Railway Co. agreed today to a new 43
month contract which is seen as a possible pattern-setter for
a national rail settlement.
Meanwhile across the nation two railroads remain strike-
bound and eight others face the possibility of a walkout.
On the west coast a longshoremen's strike which has shut
down 23 ports from Canada to Mexico went into its 23rd day with
no settlement in sight.
THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION yesterday proposed a
revised food stamp program under which two million partici-
pants would have their benefits reduced.
The proposal is considered to be a retreat from a program
proposed earlier by the administration which would have, dropped
275,000 welfare families from the program.
According to the new regulations, all people on welfare will be
eligible for food stamps except those living in communes.
A CIRCUIT COURT JURY has acquitted David Hunter of
assault to commit murder in the shooting of a motorcycle club
member at a rock concert last summer at Gallup Park.
Hunter's attorney argued successfully that the shooting was in
self-defense as Hunter was being pursued by the motorcyclist.
The jury deliberated about 12 and one half hours before deliver-
ing the not guilty verdict.
10-7
MON.-SAT.
7Ae Witte!hpp
347 Maynard St.
PURVEYOR OF THE WORLD'S FINEST WINES

By ALAN LENHOFF
Ann Arbor's Radical Inde-
pendent P a r t y (RIP) last
night voted to undertake a
series of actions in support
of striking workers of the
Buhr Machine Tool Corp.
According to the adopted plan,
RIP members and members of
other sympathetic local groups
will set up an "informational
picket line" at the Bendix Aero-
space Plant on Plymouth Rd.
Bendix is the owner of Buhr.
Buhr workers, members of
United A u t o Workers (UAW)
Local 157 have been striking
over a number of grievances
since Monday. The employes
had been working without a
contract since May 31.
The picketing, which is sched-
uled to last for one week be-
ginning Monday, will be to in-
form the workers at that plant
of the Buhr strike and to at-
tempt to keep union truck
drivers from servicing the fa-
cility.
The g r o u p expressed hope
that the Apollo moon launching
scheduled for Monday would call
attention to their action at the
aerospace facility.
In addition, RIP plans to at-
tend the Aug. 2 meeting of the
city council in an attempt to
have the city enforce its anti-
strike breaking law at the plant.
The ordinance makes it illegal
for business being struck to em-
ploy strike-breaking labor.
Last night, Buhr shop ste-
ward George Judy told the RIP
meeting of about 40 persons he
had met with City Attorney
Jerold Lax to ask him to enforce
the ordinance since Buhr has
been employing security guards
to p e rf o rm the work usually
done by union watchmen.
Judy said Lax refused to en-
force the ordinance because
there were not "enough" of the
strike-breakers,
Judy was also highly critical
of the multi-million dollar Ben-
dix Corp., citing examples where
the company moved plants with-
out allowing workers at the old
plant to work at the new facility
or providing severence pay for
those fired.
COUNTER-COUP:

Doug Cornell of the Radical Independent Party and George Judy
from the Buhr Tool Machine Company discuss RIP's plans to sup-
port striking Buhr employes at a RIP meeting last night.
Report charges Kent
killings 'prearranged'
NEW YORK Wll) - A private front of the demonstration, and
report contending that the shoot- began shooting when a single shot
ings at Kent State University from a pistol was fired into the
were prearranged by a small ground.
group of the Ohio National Guard The 226 page report was pre-
was released by a church group pared by Peter Davies, a New
yesterday. York insurance executive, and a
The report alleges that about friend of the father of one of the
eight gardsmen-tired and an- four slain students, slain in the
gry - decided among themselves May, 1970 occurence,
to "punish" the student demon-
strators by opening fire on them. The report was issued through
The guardsmen, according to the United Methodist Church's
the report, choose specific tar- Department of Law, Justice and
gets among students in the fore- Community Relations.

Numari tregains post in Sudan

CAIRO (W) - Khartoum radio reported yesterday
that Maj. Gen. Jaffar el Numairi has staged a suc-
cessful countercoup in Sudan, returning to power
just four days after he was deposed by military
rivals.
According to Egypt's Middle East News Agency,
Numairi went on the air to announce that he was
leading the country once again shortly after loyal-
ist troops routed the left wing junta which had over-
thrown him Monday.
The battle for control of the Sudanese capital of
Khartoum appeared to have been short but sharp.

There was no immediate word on the number of I
casualties or on the fate of Gen. Hashem Atta,
who led the revolt against Numairi.
It was also hot immediately clear whether the
forces that returned Numairi to power were ex-
clusively Sudanese. Atta had charged before the
government radio station fell, that "foreign" ele-
ments were attacking his government.
Soon after seizing power Numairi ordered the
arrest of all members of the Sudan Communist
Party which was believed by some to have been
behind his overthrow.

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