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July 14, 1971 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1971-07-14

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY-

Wednesday, July 14, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, July 14, 1971

House gets abortion bill
d Catinedr tor Pab sed a House opponents led bySpeak-
ed. "we've just about asked all ei William A. Ryan, who has
the questions we can think of. questioned whether the bill vio-
Either the bill gets out of com- lates civil rights of the unborn
mittee or it doesn't." child.
Rep. David S. Holmes, (D- Also left up in the air are
Detroit), chairman, agreed and implications of a recent state
asked for a motion on the bill. Supreme Court opinion by Jus-
It was offered by Rep. Jelt Siet- tice Thomas E. Brennan.
sema, (D-Grand Rapids. who
moved to r'port the bill out The court ruled the estate of
"without rrcomm ndations am an unborn child may sue for
in effect abine it.' damages on ground that the
Committee release of the fetus is a person.
bill gave abortion law reform However, the ruling did not
backers new. if qualified h o p e, speak to the question of when
after successive defeats against life actually begins.
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Task force gives 8-point proposal
for 'minority group advantages

}I

Recommendations still under
consideration include provisions
to strengthen and coordinate
the intra-university efforts of
the Opportunity Program.
The Opportunity P r o g r a m
concerns itself with the recruit-
ment. financial aid, and suppor-
tive services for disadvantaged
students. It has been adminis-
tered through the vice presi-
dency dealing with academic
services, held by former gradu-
ate school Dean Stephen Spurr
until hisrecent departure for
the University of Texas.
The task force proposal pro-
vides for the organization of a
policy-making board within the
Opportunity Program itself, em-
powered to review the program's
budget and expenditures as well
as coordinate and evaluate the
work of the program.
Presently all budgetary de-
cisions are made by the execu-
tive officers of the University,
and expenditures are approved
by areas-such as housing or
counseling-in which the sup-
portive services are provided.
The University is still deliber-
ating on recommendations for:
-Financial support of the
Black Student Community Pro-

jects which operate under the
Office of Student Services; and
-Funds for staffing and
equipping the Trotter House,
which will be leased with a grant
from the Martin Luther King
Fund.
Although Kidd is hopeful that
the administration will accept
the proposals of the task force,
reaction from another part of
the University has been less
than favorable.
Raymond Padilla, admissions
counselor and University Chi-
cano recruiter, has charged that
the all-black task force had
"failed to address itself to the
needs of all minority groups on
campus."
In a letter to President Rob-
ben Fleming. Padilla assailed
the group for their efforts to
increase representation of blacks
in University services: while
there are no Chicanos presently
employed, to meet the needs of
students in the Financial Aids
Office, Student Counseling Of-
fice, Orientation Office, and the
Housing Office.
"The University is operating
under a faulty assumption,"
stated Padilla in an interview.
"They believe that when you
deal with the problems of blacks,

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Judith Crist, New York Magazine:
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William Wolf, Cue Magazine:
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Frances Herridge, N.Y. Post:
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'PERFECT FRIDAY'

Conversations with
PAUL TILLICH
(A Film Series
TODAY: 4:00 p.m.-Dr. Tillich discuss-
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you also deal with those of
'other minorities.' The problems
of Chicanos who cannot speak
English are vastly different
than those of blacks."
Questioned about the compo-
sition of the task force, Kidd
responded that the group was
merely a "summer stop-gap
measure wh ic h had originally
intended only to deal with the
problems of blacks. Because
some of the problems discussed
touched many minorities, how-
ever, they were all included."
,de stressed the temporary na-
ture of the task force itself.
stating that an evaluative group
including all minorities will be
organized in the fall to continue
its wprk.
Bell strike set
to begin todlay
(Continued from Pae 3i
switchboards and perform bill
ing tasks.
The union says that it will
continue to service govern-
ment-operated telephone s y s -
tems essential for national se-
curity.
The CWA rejected May 23 a
three-year contract package
that the company says amounts
to a 30 per cent increase when
wages, cost-of-living increases
and fringe benefits are counted.
It included a 17 per cent in-
crease in wag.
Beirne said the company's
accounting was misleading and
that the contract offer c o n-
tained many inequities.
He said the company aI s o
had not responded to the un-
ion's demand for an agency
shop, wherein nonmembers
would be required to pay union
dues.
Pay for telephone workers cur-
rently ranges from tops of
$118 weekly for operators to
$193 for craftsmen.
Beirne lambasted the B e 11
system not only for "antifemin-
sm" but for "neanderthal
thinking" and "scandalous" be-
havior.
He said if the company's
last-minute offer turns out to
be acceptable the strike will be
the fault of Bell management
personnel "that haven't the
brains to go to the bathroom"
and should be removed from
their jobs by the courts or
Congress.
HAIRTYLING
UMUnion
Babers
Cl 66-4431 for
appointment
DIAL 5 6290
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MAJESTY ON FILM
IT IS WONDERFUL!"
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