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July 08, 1971 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-07-08

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, July 8, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, July 8, 1971

I

nyeAws hAbriefs
By The Associated Press

Commission criticizes arrests

THE U.S. GOVERNMENT has assured Pakistan it will not cur-
tail shiploads of ammunition and military spare parts still due to
arrive in Pakistan from the U.S., Foreign Office sources reported
yesterday.
The Indian government, which had no immediate comment on
the report, had asked the U.S. to halt all military and economic aid
to Pakistan as a way to end civil strife in East Pakistan and to in-
sure the return of seven million Pakistani refugees now in India.
MICHIGAN INDIANS reacted angrily yesterday when Warren
Shapton, deputy director of the Department of Natural Resources,
declared at a meeting that heavy netting of lake trout by Indian
commercial fishermen could not continue.
Shapton's statement brought vows from Indians attending the
meeting of the Michigan Commission on Indian Affairs that they
would protect their rights under ancient treaties to unlimited fishing,
recently affirmed by the Michigan Supreme Court.
Indians have been netting large amounts of lake trout for com-
mercial sale and some white commercial and sports fishermen re-
portedly have been cutting the Indians' nets, prompting threats of
retaliation by Indians.
THE GENERAL MANAGER of the Michigan State Fair-
grounds, E. J. Keirns, has declared the fairgrounds in Detroit off-
limits to future rock festivals following last weekend's drug-plagued
rockfest.
Gov. William Milliken had already ordered his staff Tuesday to
explore ways of preventing future rock concerts on state property
after learning one person had died and 21 had been hospitalized for
reactions to drugs taken at last weekend's concert.
JAMES HOFFA, former Teamsters Union president, obtained
yesterday from the U.S. Board of Parole an Aug. 20 review of his
request for parole from federal prison. The hearing was originally
set for next June.
George Reed, chairman of the parole board, said the board found
sufficient new evidence to warrant an appellate review by the board.
Hoffa has been in prison at Lewisburg, Pa. since March, 1967,
serving sentences totalling 13 years for convictions on jury-tamper-
ing and mail-fraud charges. He has twice been turned down by the
board in attempts to win parole.
PRIME MINISTER EDWARD HEATH declared yesterday he is
staking the life of his Conservative government on his decision to
lead Britain into the European Common Market, calling on the na-
tion to choose between joining the market or facing a long slide into
political and economic impotence.
Victor Feather, chief of the Trades Union Congress, immediately
declared that the conditions for entry negotiated by the government
were unacceptable, raising the prospect of opposition by nine million
workers.

(Continued from Page 3
"Even though in some cases
there were as many officers as
prisoners, and the officers were
doing nothing of an official na-
ture, no effort was made" to fill
out the field arrest forms, the re-
port said.
Last week Wilson appeared on
television, saying if faced again
with the situation which occur-
red May 3-5 when thousands of
antiwar demonstrators attempt-
ed to stop Washington traffic, he
would again suspend the use of
field arrest forms and order mass
arrests and jailings.
According to the commission,
one of the chief factors which
hindered the city attorney's of-
fice from successfully prosecut-
ing those arrested was the fact
that the police entered a charge
of "disorderly conduct" in nearly
every case.
"A typical exchange," the

commission said, "would be for
someone arrested while walking
down the street to be told that
the grounds for arrest were fail-
ure to move on. Some people
were told they were jaywalking.
The blanket charge or -disorderly
conduct entered later . . . contra-
dicted the oral charges first as-
serted in many cases."
This discrepancy, as well as a
general lack of sufficient evi-
dence, have led to a very low
conviction rate. Out of the first
3,949 Mayday cases to come be-
fore the District of Columbia Su-
perior Court, only 79 convictions
were obtained.
In further developments stem-
ming from the Mayday arrests.
the American Civil Liberties Un-
ion (ACLU) has announced it
plans to file a class action suit
against the Washington city gov-
ernment and has publicly adver-
tised for Mayday arrestees to

sign affidavits to aid its action.
According to one ACLU spokes-
man, the suit would seek to en-
join the Washington police de-
partment from making further
mass arrests through suspended
arrest procedures, to expunge all
arrest records of cases not prose-
cuted, and to obtain monetary
damages.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results
DIAL 5-6290
603 E. Liberty
"MAJESTY ON FILM!
IT IS WONDERFUL!"

7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY
JULY 1t

10:00 p.m.

Akira Kurosawa's LOWER DEPTHS
TOSHIRO MIFUNE ISUZO YAMADA GANJIRO NAKAMURA
"I have no fear of overpraising LOWER DEPTHS:
the film is as near perfect as makes no matter."
-NEW YORKER
1st BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. HURON-near State St.
$1 contribution ARM/Michigan Film Society
free coffee Ecumenical Campus Center

a*

In everyone's life there's a
SUMMER OF '42
-SHOWN DAILY--
1,3,5,7,9 P.M
NEXT
"PLAZA SUITE"

REPERTORY 71
tennessee williams'
Shakespeare's * A STREETCAR NAMED
* TWELFTH NIGHT In Repertory (July 27-31
24 DESIRE
show's u phillip dean's
* YOU CAN NEVER TELL * THE GHOST DANCERS Aug. 3-7

Daily Official Bulletin
THURSDAY, JULY 9
Summer Film Festival: "Cool Hand
uke," Aud. A, Angell Hall, 7, 9, 11
U-M Audio-Visual Education Center:
"Dream of the Wild Horses, Poems. Fire
Mountain, Geronimo Jones, J.T.,"
UGLI Multipurpose Rm, 7-9 p.m.
FOREIGN VISITORS
Following individual can be reach-
ed through the Foreign Visitor Div.,
Rms. 22-24, Mich. Union, 764-2148: F.
Dallou, Cultural Ait., United States
Snoa Sericer,tuwait, July 6-9.
CAREER PLANNING &
PLACEMENT
3200 S.A.B.
F.S.E.E., Federal Serv. E n t r a n c e
Exam, will be given for the last time
this summer on July 17: apply this
week for the exam; applications avail.
in our office
The place to meet
INTERESTING people
BACH CLUB
presents
THREE BACH SONATAS
FOR FLUTE AND PIANO
No. 3 in A major,
No. 4 in C major,
No. 5 in E minor
Performed by
Lanita Arcengeli
and
Greg Zelman
Spanish Rice Served
after the program
THURS., JULY 8-8 P.M.
S. Quad West Lounge
EVERYONE invited. Musical
knowledge REALLY not necessary
Further Info: 761-3931

SHAGS FOR MEN
UM BARBERS
UM Union
Call 662-4431
for appointment

- OPENING
Lydia Mendelssohn
Box Office Open
12:30-5:00 p.m.
Ph. 668-6300

SOON! -
SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS
$5.00 to $8.00
INDIVIDUAL TICKETS
$1.50 to $2.50

a

STARTING TONIGHT DIAL 8-6416 You Must Be Proof o
SHOWS AT 7:15 - 9:00 P.MYoo
ALL SEATS $2.50 18 or Older Requl
PRESENTE DIN

if Age
red

THE
UNPUBLISHABLE
NOVEL IS NOW
AMERICA'S MOST
CONTROVERSIAL
FILM!
CHRISTINA HART- MICHAEL GARRETT RATED x
ANGELIQUE DEMOLINE
- DONNA STANLEY
EASTMANCOLOR EXECUTIVE PRODUCER WRITTEN ANDD nEf E B-
A MANAViSION INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTION a SHERPIX RELEAS LOUIS K. SHER n ALF SILLIMAN JR.

4
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