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July 07, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-07-07

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 7, 1971

_aeSx H ICA DIYWensay uy ,17

TONIGHT ONLY!_
HOWARD HAWKS'
THE THING
FROM ANOTHER WORLD
(RKO, 1951) Ranks with Invasion of the Body
Snatchers for sheer virtuosity on a shoestring
budget--i.e., SCARY.
"The story interested me as an adult treatment of
an often infantile subject."
-Howard Hawks
ALSO CHAP. 10 FLASH GORDON
AUD. A 7 and 9 P.M. 75c

Jazz king Armstrong dead at 71

NEW YORK (AP) - Lou
"Satchmo" Armstrong, below
troubadour of the jazz trumpe
with a delightful rasp to his voi
and roll to his eye, died yesterd:
his heart worn out, his golde
horn silent at last. He was 7
years old Sunday.
A spokesman for the fami
said Armstrong died in his sle
this morning at his Queens hon
and attributed the cause of dea
to heart failure.
"Me and my horn, we core
long way together," Armstror
once observed.
Together, they came out of
waif'srefuge in New Orleaus, i
river to Chicago along the trs
of jazz itself, then on to t h
show business pinnacles of Ne
York and Las Vegas, and t
motion picture studios of Hoh
wood.
And before they were throng
Armstrong and his born,
gether, had fascinated millior
on five of the earth's confinert
enthralling royalty smng w:
the humblest of jazz fans.
"In Africa," Armstrong on.
reminisced, "the local tib'ie ca
ried in their chief to where 1 w,
playing. All he did sec's ji

ed
at,
ce
ay,
en
71
ly
ep
te
th
c!
ng

look down and say just one word.
'Satchma!' Man, they knnw roe
even out there."
But ill health made progressive
inroads on the ebullient a1 tist
with the unforgettable grimace
and grin. He was in and o.t ci
hospitals during the past liv(
years, as liver and kidney ci-
ments took their toll on his heart.
Armstrong's last public appe&-
ance was at the Waldorf-A s
Hotel here, where he opened a
two week engagement Mareni.
From there, he went into Beth

Israel Hospital for heart tree
ment.
At the time, he was desc--bed
as frail, with halting gait, his 5-
feet 6 figure wasted down from
226 pounds to 15.
To thank the many, st.iIic
who had relayed best wishes to
him in the hospital, Armstr ng
gave an intreview at his hone
June 23. He played his trenet
and promised, "I'm going tack
to work."
He never made It.

Libera
e (Continued from FP
w liberation, in that it h
he man to know her own:
a woman, she also t
women's liberation ma
h. man unfeminine. She
o- some women try to pl
ns role, and at the same
, putting men down."
h should never put a m
she says.
cc Sheba feels that co
r- of her dancing made
a: mean more to hert
t made by men. "It isd

marbleized colors are the news
y 1B
in Garland knits for Miss J
Light and dark tones knit
together add keen variety to
fall wardrobes in four close-fit
ribbed Acrilan acrylic
separates. Brick or navy.
;# y Pants, S-M-L. Tops, 36-40.
A. Cardigan in brick/black
or navy/beetroot. $14.
Shortcut pull-on pant $9.
B. Rolled-neck sweater. $13.
Pull-on flare pant. $15.
AIL

ted belly moves
age 5) a woman not to feel jealous of
elps a wo- the dancing with the men watch-
identity as ing." If a woman comes up to
thinks that her and compliments her, Sheba
akes a wo- feels, it takes a lot of courage.
feels that "Hut really," Sheba says, "tin
ay a man's
time, are really a together chick, letting it
"A woman all hang out."
an down,"
ompliments Arts exploited
than those (Continued from Page 5)
difficult for foundation improperly executed
by a lazy construction crew.
All this is not to knock the
generally high quality of many
performances of these discs:
top-notch conductors (B e r n-
stein and Szell) and pianists
(Andre Watts and Ivan Davis)
unwittingly contribute their
talents to this suspect "artistic"
endeavor while Andre Kosta-
lanetz oozes along in his typ-
ically Muzakian orchestral
transcriptions.
The worst seems yet to come,
however, as other companies
challenge Columbia in a race
for the lowest common denon-
inator of taste. Upon first
sampling United Artists' "Sin-
foonias" (containing the "ori-
ginal hit version" of "Mozart
Symphony No. 40"), I didn't
know whether to laugh at the
insipid rhythmic strumming of
electric guitars recorded over
orchestral movements by
Beethoven, Mozart and Schu-
bert, or to cry at the sense-
less despoliation of great mu-
sical masterpieces.
In addition, RCA has just
initiated a series of "Greatest
Hits" (which its ads dub "In-
stant Collections") that resem-
ble Columbia's so closely that
about the only way to tell the
two companies' releases apart is
by their trademarks
DIAL 8-6416
TODAY ATth
7, 9 P.M.
nigM
visitor

a

4,

4'

HIGHEST RATING!
SPELLBINDING!"
K. Y. Daily News
"A CAPTIVATING
THRILLER!"
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"A CHILLING,
VIOLENT
SUSPENSE
THRILLER!"
Women's Wear Daily
"IF YOUR FLESH
DOESN'T CRAWL,
IT'S ON
TOO TIGHT!"
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