100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 03, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-Sa turday; July 3, 197 1

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, July 3, 1971

Papers disputed
(Continued from page 1
build morale, the Times said it
was told by informed sources
in Washington.
In Washington, asked about
the report, the Defense Depart-
ment would not comment offic-
ially, but Pentagon sources said
it was not true.
Meanwhile. Secretary of De-
fense Melvin R. Laird today or-
dered security custody of all
secret documents taken away
from the Rand Corp., a "think
tank" which once employed Dr.
Daniel Ellsberg.
The action follows Ellsberg's
indictment last M o n d a y on
charges of theft and unauthor-
ized possession of government
documents. Ellsberg has ack-
nowledged t h a t he was the
s o u r c e of the documents on
which the New York Times and
other publications based articles
on the origins and growth of
U.S. involvement in the Viet-
nam war.
"Lax security practices among
defense contractors can no more
be tolerated than will such prac-
tices within this department,"
Laird said in a memorandum to
Secretary of the Air Force Rob-
ert Seamons.
Pentagon spokesman Daniel Z.
Henkin indicated that precau-
tionary security checks are be-
ing made at other "think tank"
and industrial contractors which
have custody of sensitive classi-
fied material.
Abortion
(Continued from Page 3)
Out of wedlock births, although
increasing at a steady rate over
the years, for the first time
showed a decrease in actual num-
bers. There were 7,764 in the first
three months of 1970, and 7,581
in January through March this,
year.
- "Incomplete abortions,"
those completed in hospitals
but begun elsewhere, seem to
be declining, indicating a re-
duction in criminal abortions.
Chase said fears that t h e
city would not be able to pro-
vide abortions for poor women
have proved unfounded. At city
hospitals, no woman is turned
away if she is unable to pay,
even if she is ineligible for
medicaid, he said.

Pentagon
(Continued from page1
But the flow of men and
supplies to the South contin-
ued "undiminished." The Times
said.
The Times said the study also
reported that a Defense De-
partment seminar of 47 scien-
tists concluded in August 1966
that the bombing of the North
was having "no measurable ef-
fect."
The Pentagon documents re-
veal-that the ineffectiveness of
the bombing of North Vietnam
and the constantly increasing
need for more troops gradually
disillusioned Defense Secretary
Robert McNamara and o t h e r
top officials with the conduct
of the war.
Describing his attitude to-
wards the war, the Pentagon
analysts said the secretary had.
gone from "hesitancy" in th e
winter of 1965 to "perplexity"
in the spring of 1966 to "dis-
enchantment" the following
fall.
Meanwhile, articles baked on
the'Pentagon Pap rsmade
available to the Assoiated
Press show President Lyndon
Johnson sought to avoid a pre-
mature attack on North Viet-
nam and that .his administra-
tion later miscalculated its own
troop needs and the enemy's
ability to build strength.
The AP said the study show-
ed presidential adviser. M c -
George Bundy and policy plan-
ner Walt W. Rostow were urg-
ing Johnson four months into
his - term tocombinemilitary
piressure agstoat North Viet-
nam with pacification efforts in
the South.
However, Johnson decided ac-
tion against the North would
be planned only on a contin-
gency basis and would be car-
ried out only after building up
U.S. political and military
strength in the South.
The bombing of North Viet-
nam was under way by No-
vember 1964, and although i t s-
tempo increased through 1965,
"there was no sign," the Pent-
agon study says, that it "had
brought about any greater
readiness to settle" on the part
of North Vietnamese "except
on their terms."

Food cooperatives gain

(Continued from page 1)
The area in which the two op-
erations diverge most distinctly
is that of the foods offered.
The organic coop, true to the
ideals of a complete alternative
to traditional foods, deals in spe-
cialty items such as organic pea-
nut butter, organic wheat, and
special herbs and teas not avail-
able in ordinary stores.
The Rainbow people's party co-
op offers a fare more easily re-
cognizable by those unattuned to
new trends in eating.
The vegetables and fruits listed
by the group as typical of their
purchases would be at home on
any traditional American supper
table.
Coop organizers claim there
is considerable difference be-
tween the produce you get at the
local store and that which they
offer. -
Their produce, they say, comes,
directly from the farmers them
selves and is not packaged or
treated with. chemicals, like the
supermarket produce..
In terms, of prices, both plans
appear to offer a significant bar-
gain.
The two grocery bags offered
by the Rainbow People for four
dollars would, for example, cost
over ten dollars in local super-
markets, according to one sur-
vey.
The organic coop also offers
significant savings over com-
mercial markets, as expenses for
profit, wages for employees, and
middle-man fees, passed along
to the customer in supermarkets
are eliminated-.
2ND HIT WEEK
Program Information 434-1782
On Woshtenow Ave.
1 1I2 Miles East of U.S. 23
MUSIC,
LAUGHTER,
& LOVE
-Equal-
PURE FUN!
Wed.-Sat.-Sun
OPEN 1 P.M,.
SHOWS AT 1 :15-4 P.M.
6:30 & 9 P.M.
:Other DLY A

In response to these alterna-
tives in pricing, service and
goods, area residents, especially
students, have patronized these
services in increasing numbers.
Organic food coop members
say business has picked up dra-
matically within the last month
alone, while the Rainbow Peo-
ple's Party claims around 200
people use their service each
week.
The very success of these op-
erations, however, has raised
considerable problems for coop
members.
A formidable problem facing
the Rainbow People is that of
transportation. As the numbers
of customers increase, the diffi-
culty of moving all their orders
intensifies.
More vans, organizers say, will
be needed if the operation con-
tinues to- expand.
The organic coop also is be-
ginning to feel the pinch of an in-
creasing demand on their limited
resources. New and larger facili-
ties are necessary, organizers
say, to operate the coop on a
sound financial basis and make
expansion possible.
In the face of these difficulties
the idea of a merger between the
two groups has taken on attrac-
tive dimensions.
DIAL 8-6416
TODAY AT
1, 3,5,
7, 9 P.M.
night
isito
HIGhEST RATING!
SPELLBINDING!
.Y. Dully News
"A CAPTIATING
yTHRILE!"
N.4Y. Times
"A CHILLING,
VIOLENT
SUSPENSE
THRILLER!"
Women's Wear Daily
"IF YOUR FLESH
DOESN'T CRAWL,
IT'S ON
TOO TIGHT!"
took Magazine

popularity
Serious talks toward this end
have been going on for the last
few weeks but with little result as
yet.
While discussing merger and
the sharing of facilities and re-
sources goes on. other methods
of dealing with the problam are
being considered.
One proposal under considera- 4
tion would decentralize opera-
tions, and smaller coops would
be organized on a neighborhood
basis.
Whatever plan is accepted, it
seems certain that as long as
present trends continue, the fu-
ture of coops in the city is as-
sured.
Want Ad
pI
Tonight & Tomorrow
MARLENE DIETRICH

SHANGHAI
EXPRESS
Directed by Josef Von Stern-
berg, 1932. Dietrich as Shang-
hai Lil, beautiful high class lover
fleeing Revolution-torn China
on a train filled with adventure.
Also with Ann Moe Wong &
Cli e Brook
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
7:00&9:00P .
75c

with: Cheese, Pepperoni, Sausage, Peppers
Mushrooms $2.25
Serving: 11 A.M.-I :30 at nite
208 W. HURON
ARM Michigan Film Society-
Ecumenical Campus Center
present
Paul Newman
as
IN COLOR
"A slam-bang mystery yarn that could be right off the Raymond
Chandler shelf . . . bubbles with biting dialogue."-N.Y. Times
"loaded with action . .. dialogue that is laconic, pointed and a
bit cynical . . . much of the impressive crispness and proficiency
of THE BIG SLEEP and THE MALTESE FALCON."
Saturday, July 3 Tuesday, July 6
1st Baptist Church 1st Presbyterian Church
502 E. Huron 1432 Washtenaw Ave.
near State St. near S. University
7:30 & 9:30

k
i
f

the ann arbor film cooperative presents
JACK LEMMON-TONY CURTIS-NATALIE WOOD
with Keenan Wynn and Peter Falk in the 2 -hour uproarious rollicking comedy
.THEGREAT RACE
directed by BLAKE EDWARDS (The Pink Panther, Shot in the Dark, The Party)
IN COLOR. WITH MUSIC BY HENRY MANCINI
0 The Mad Automobile Race! . The Western Saloon Brawl! 0 The Great Pie
Fight! 0 The Sinking Iceberg 0 The Friend's Dungeon! 0 The Devilish Dirigi-
cylce!
"Fine fun, family-style. A long, bulging movie comic-strip-and a funny, festive, and entertain-
ing one-culled from the good old days of sneering villains, handsome, daredevil h e r o e s and
beautiful, death defying heroines . . . wildly funny and outrageous story line moves like light-
ning. . . . A fine, disarming cast handles everything from custard pies to raging blizzards, keyed
by the wonderfully zany Jack Lemmon, as the sneaky villain."-The New York Times

SPECIAL HOLIDAY SHOW-Sunday, July 4 ONLY!
auditorium a 7:00 and 9:45 p.m. only 75c
angell all Tickets on sale for both shows at 6:15) children 35c
COMING TUESDAY: Two color horror films by Roger Corman with Vincent Price

I

$1 contribution

free coffee

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan