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July 03, 1971 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-07-03

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Saturday, July 3, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five
Meadowbrook: Music on the estate

By STUART GANNES
There was this beautiful roll-
ing farmland outside of Detroit
and the barons of the Motor
City were eager to lay their
hands on something more last-
ing than automobiles.
So they built magnificent
country estates-far from their
factories - where they could
rest and ponder events. Safely
ensconced in their mansions.
the founders of the auto indus-
try enjoyed the natural splen-
dors of Michigan, splendors
which most of us only s e e
through our rear-vi-w mirrors
and tinted windshields.
But unlike Olympians of ear-
lier times, the auto-barons of
Detroit were mortal, their names
being relegated (in chrome)
to the fenders of the machines
they spawned - and later
spurned.
As for the estates, they gen-
erally remained intact until
the combined forces of social
conscience and rising taxes
drove their heirs to bequeath
them to public institutions and
land speculators, depending of
course on the ups and downs of
the Dow Jones Index.
Which brings us to the Dodge
family, who tithed their chunk
of Michigan to the state uni-
versity in East Lansing, which
in turn built the satellite cam-
pus of Oakland University on
the land and whose directors hit
upon the idea of bringing them-
selves some attention (and
status) by having a summer
music festival featuring the De-
troit Symphony Orchestra per-
forming on the green pastures
of the old Dodge estate.
More time passed and when
the organizers of the festival
realized that the large num-
bers of young people who at-
tended thetconcerts would also
be willing to spend their mon-
ey to see performers who, shall
we say, didn't exactly fit into
the classical mold - and con-
sequently a series of "popular"
concerts on Wednesday a n d
Friday nights were included in
the program.
"Introducing Meadowbrook's
The Michiean Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day ihrough Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $1 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.
$1.50
BOB
WHITE
"a fullness and
sensitivity equal
to anyone singing
folk music today."

--MICH. DAILY

never lets anyone forget he is
listening to the blues.
Like a middle-aged b l a c k
matron. Lucille buts into your
consciousness to relate what's
on her mind. Her sounds tell
you, warm you about the blues.
they swallow your troubles by
showing what hard times a r e
really like.
MeanWhile King smiles down
at his guitar watching his own
hands play, fascinated by his
own music. Lucille talks back,
she tells her story to the band
which responds in harmonic
sympathy.
Then she turns to the aud-
ience, an audience reeking of
good vibrations and urging
King plus Lucille to greater
heights and more incredible
riffs.
The concert reaches its cli-
max when King plays "The
Thrill is Gone." Lucille spells
out her troubles in no uncer-
tain terms, lecturing the crowd
with authority garnered from
life's hard blows. But at t h e
same time, King entices you
with the pleasures of what the
thrill was like when it w a s
still around, and Lucille re-
sponds with an awesome
t h u m p i n g pick-up-let-down
rhythm which first stuns t h e

audience then drives it into a
wild submission to the over-
whelming beat.
Would have just freaked-out
the old Dodge boys.
WNV" I EiCUI
Because its my
country. And it's "
ge tigdirly
Thats why
A
Keep America Clean.
KeepAmericaBeautiful.
Advertising contributed
for the publtc good.

new rock-folk series," proclaims
the festival's promotional liter-
ature. "Rock, folk, country
blues - whatever you name it,
it's the music of our time. This
year Meadowbrook presents a
Celebration of Today, with such
modern legends as.. .
"You'll see and hear the
Aquarian Age stars that a r e
shaping - our era . . . and all
this, of course, in the acous-
tically perfect Baldwin Pavil-
ion . . . At Meadowbrook, na-
ture and great music merge in-
to one thrilling experience."
Which is why last Wednes-
day night large portions of the
old Dodge estate were t r a n s-
formed into a gigantic parking-
lot populated not only by Dod-
ges but Volkswagens as well.
The cars grazed peacefully in
the old pastures as their pleas-
antly stoned driver sat on
Meadowbrook's hillside getting
more stoned and getting into
the music of B. B. King who was
getting it together with his band
despite the heavens and Sonny
Eliot who both forecast r si n
but not the good music avail-
able for those willing to truck
on out to Rochester and listen
to the blues.
As for B. B. King, does he

ever give a bad performance?
Opening with his theme song
"Every Day I Have the Blues"
and then running through the
rest of his favorites King snar-
ed the crowd into his notes and
rhythms.
There, on stage, a small chub-
by figure whose miniature
hands toyed on the strings of
Lucille, King's incredible g u i -
tar.
B. B. King and Lucille act like
a team. It's as if two per-
formers are on stage, taking
cues and responding to e a c h
other's music though both pos-
sess the same body.
On top of the King's figure
standing in the spotlight is a
smiling face, the face of a
gospel singer whose rich voice
just drips with sweetness, lift-
ing his congregation with ly-
rics never heard in a church.
And just below the smile rests
Lucille, waiting for the cue to
take over. When it comes she
is ready. Plaintative but com-
manding her notes rush
through wires on stage and leap
into the hearts and soul of
the crowd. Whereas King's
sweet voice shades the impact
of his music's message Lucille

the ann arbor film cooperative presents
COLOR HORROR SPECIAL-Two by Roger Corman
(Shown at 7:00
ALE OF TERROR & 1015p.m.)
loosely based on three stories by Edgar Alien Poe-"Moreila,"
"The Black Cat," and "The Case of M. Valdemar" with VIN-
CENT PRICE, PETER LORRE, BASIL RATHBONE, and DEBRA
PAGET.
The Haunted Palace 8Shonly)
loosely based on Edgar Allen Poe's poem with VINCENT PRICE,
DEBRA PAGET, LON CHANEY, Jr., and ELISHA COOK.
-EXTRA ADDED ATTRACTION-ROAD RUNNER CARTOON-
TUESDAY-July 6-ONLY
auditorium a both for only 75c
angell hall Complete shows at 7:00 & 8:40 p.m.
SUN., JULY 4-Holiday Special-THE GREAT RACE-7 & 9:45 p.m.

WORSHIP

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 am.-Holy Communion.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Warship Services. Sunday School
12-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 p.m.-Testimony Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Truth That Heals," Radio WAAM, 1600,
Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 668-6427.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
10:00 a.m. - Worship Service and Church
School.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
10:00 a:m.-A message from Youth in the
Church and Dr. Cowing: "My Church, My
Faith and Me."
Broadcast WNRS 1290 AM, WNRZ 103 FM,
11:00 to noon.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
801 S. Forest
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Holy Communion
- WEDNESDAY
9:30 p.m.-Free-Form Worship.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Comer State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
10:00 a.m.-Sunday School.
10:00 a.m.-Service: "in Pursuit of Happi-
ness," Rev, Terry N. Smith.
There is infant and toddler care in the nursery.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.-Speaking:
Mr. Sanders.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Corner of Forest and Washtenow
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Celebration.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:45 a.m.-Bible Class.
Sunday at I 1 :00 a.m.-Service.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Postar-971-3152
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-I 1:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Training Hour-6:00 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
Sunday ot 11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
You may think it's Independence Day, but the
Russians know better. It's really Saint
Vladimir's Day Eve.

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