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June 30, 1971 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-06-30

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Wednesdoy, June 30, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven

Wednesday. June 30. 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Eleven

Amazing Doctor Meriwether
prepares for Pat Am Games
BERKELEY, Calif. ()- Dr. gust at the P. American er's main problem, howe
Delano Meriwether already has Games in Cali, Colombia. Finding time for workouts is
proved himself to Americans. Meriwether was the sensa- Because of his work in b
Now he's set to make a believer tion of the indoor track season, research and patient care,
out of international track ath- not only because he was a rank gets to run in practice me
letes. beginner who knocked off es- two or three times a week.
The 28-year-old hematologist, tablished stars but because he "I don't have anyt
surely the world's fastest part- runs in swimming trunks held against daily workouts, I
time athlete, ran a wind-aided up by suspenders. don't have the time."
100-yard dash in nine seconds Amateur Athletic Union of- He'll have even less tim
flat last Friday to win the Na- ficials say, however, that Meri- e'll he e eley
tional AAU title at Eugene, Ore. wether will have to wear the prepare for the Berkeley
This weekend, he'll be com- same uniform the rest of the and admitted to feeling g
peting here against the Rus- American team wears at Berke- because he competed at Eug
sians and the World All-stars. ley. "We're in the process ofn
His performance at Eugene "That's going to be a real ing from Baltimore to Bos
brought to a climax the story- problem," he said last week in and my wife had to stay
book saga of a man who began Eugene, when he was inform- to do all the packing this w
serious running competition ed of the decision. "As long as end," he said in Eugene,
less than a year ago. It also you're not overly gaudy, I think "You gentlemen who
earned him a berth on the U.S. it adds something- to track." married can imagine what
team that will compete in Au- Costumes are not Meriweth- thinks about my gallivan
- -------- around the country to ru
a ishould be home packing
stead of being here,"
Fans' protest aans mps Vsedr astyi
RHS ~ te~ R an~t H1 S Meriether said a saory
national sports publica#
fa i which indicated that he b
ails 111 rem-e Court test running only after watchi
track meet on television

ELATED OVER RULING:

i

i

ever.
S.
lood
, he
aybe
;ing
just
e to
meet
uilty
ene.
mov-
ston,
ome
veek-
are
she
ting
n. I
in-
in a
tion,
egan
ng a
and

Ali won't
CHICAGO (P) - Muhammad
Ali's attorney said yesterday
the former heavyweight cham-
pion has 'no plans to sue the
World Boxing Association or
other boxing authorities w h o
stripped him of his title or sus-
pended him as a fighter after
he was convicted of draft eva-
sion.
"We'll let bygones be by-
gones," said Chauncey Eskridge'
the Chicago lawyer who direct-
ed the lengthy legal battle
which ended Monday, when the
U.S. Supreme Court overturn-
ed Ali's conviction and five-
year prison sentence for refus-
ing induction into the Armed
forces.
"Naturally I was elated over
the decision," Eskridge said. "It
means finally somebody agrees
with you. We went through the
District Court twice, the Cir-
cuit Court twice, the Circuit
Court of Appeals twice and then
we briefed our case in the Su-
preme Court twice. Finally we
got a breakthrough where a
court agreed with us. You can't
help but be elated,
"We tried every opportunity
we got to convince our oppon-
ents that they were wrong in
characterizing Ali's religious be-
liefs as racial and political."
Eskridge said the high court's
decision presents an opportun-
ity for all Black Muslims, the

sue WBA
sect of which Ali is a member
and members of other unor-
thodox religious groups opposed
to war to resist induction into
the armed services as consci-
entious objectors.
"It is our hope that members
of such religious groups w ill
take advantage of this decis-
ion," the attorney said.
"This case stands for the
proposition that you look to the
individual for his religious be-
liefs, not to a group concensus
as to the totality of such be-
liefs," he said.
Referring to a Justice De-
partment letter to the Ken-
tucky Selective Service Appeal
board recommending that Ali be
denied classification as a con-
scientious objector, Eskridge
said:
"We tried repeatedly to con-
vince the judges and Justice
Department how awful that let-
ter was. If the letter confused
two District and two Appellate
courts, then it must have con-
fused the draft board composed
of laymen.
Eskridge said the federal sta-
tute has been amended s i n c e
1967 to da away with the pro-
cedure whereby the Justice De-
partment advises draft boards,
"We call that the Muham-
mad Ali amendment," Eskridge
said.

NEW YORK (1P) - S t a t e
Supreme Court Justice J a-c ob
Grumet ruled yesterday that
although baseball "umpires
have been known on occasion
to make bad decisions," t h e
s judiciary will not interfere with
them provided they are honest
and rendered in good faith.
The matter came up in Man-
hattan Supreme Court when
three Mets patrons sued for the
return of their ticket money
because they charged the S h e a
Stadium opener on April .6
should have been called off be-
cause of inclement weather.
In angry language, the three
paying customers charged that
the Metropolitan Baseball Club,
Inc., the Mets, "wantonly and
with mercenary intent disre-
garded its duties and permitted
* the game to be played u n d e r
conditions which made it im-
possible for any spectator to
witness it without jeopardiz-
ing his health, well-being and
safety."
It rained, snowed and sleeted
and the winds blew in g a 1 e
* force, the irate plaintiffs charg-
ed.
The chairman of the b a 11
club's board contended that the
game was played in accord-
ance with official baseball rules,
Judge Grumet said.
Some 30,835 tickets were sold
before April 6, 4,113 were s o l d
on the day of the game and
26,062 fans attended.
The club official said that the
rain stopped at 2:15 p.m. and
SJoin
CO-OPS
(668-6872)

that shortly thereafter the line-
up cards were handed to the
umpire-in-chief.
The official then said as re-
flected in the judge's decis-
ion, "the crowds thereupon
cheered as the ground crew re-
moved the tarpaulin. The play-
ing field was in excellent condi-
tion. The game was played for
four-and-one-half innings," and
became official under the rules
before it was terminated by the
umpires "in deteriorating wea-
ther.
"While it may be that the
decision of the management and
the umpires was not a correct
one, that is not for the Court
to say. That is beyond its juris-
diction and ability," the j u d g e
wrote.
"Umpires have been known
on occasion to make bad deci-
sions. These decisions very often
arouse the wrath of irate fans.
But the Court may not inter-
fere unless there is a clear
showing of a corrupt motive or
bad faith."
Since "no such showing has
been made," Grumet said, "the
plaintiffs are not entitled to re-
turn of their money."
Two of the plaintiffs are law-
yers, and the third is an insur-
ance executive. They undertook
the action on behalf of them-
selves and others who bought
tickets for the opener.

deciding that he could neat the
sprinters, wasn't quite true.
"The incident they mention-
ed did happen, but by t h a t
time I already had some run-
ning under my belt," he said. "I
started primarily for exercise."
Most world-class sprinters
have muscular thighs, but Meri-
wether is greyhound-like at 6-
foot-2 and 158 pounds.
Track coaches say there's no
limit to how fast he could run
if he lifted weights to build up
his muscles.
They also think he's be un-
touchable if he ever puts to-
gether the basic fundamentals
of sprinting: starting and s us-
tained acceleration.
He stunned track experts at
Eugene by saying, "I usually
start coasting at 70 yards, but
today I kept pumping my arms.
That's how I got second place
finisher Jim Greene. I also got
out of the blocks with the gang.
That's amazing, for me."
The 9.0 clocking would have
been a world record if it hadn't
been for the aiding wind, which
was slightly over the allowable
limit for records.
He could eventually get the
record, but he says his heavy
personal work schedule p r e-
vents him from speculating a-
bout such things as the 1972
Olympics.
"Perhaps I'm old. My run-
ning days may be limited."

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