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June 19, 1971 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-06-19

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, June 19, 1971

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, June 19, 1971

Gov't. wins reversal in Appeals Court

I; I

(Continued from page1 i
dent Ngo Dinh Diem, more than
the American government, who
was responsible for the elections
not taking place. Diem flatly re-
fused even to discuss the ele^-
tions with the Communist regime
in Hanoi, the article stated.
Today's article says that the
bombing pause between 1965 and
1968 were designed simply to
placate world oprnn, and John-
son administration strategists
had no expectations that the
pauses would lead to peace talks.
contrary to the:r public state-
ments.
Seeking a permanent ban on
further publication of the Penta-
gon study, the government has
argued that the articles are dam-
aging to national security, and
would reparably damage rela-
tions with the United States and
its allies, and violate legal buss
on the dissemination of classified
documents.

Both the Times and the Post,
however, has argued that the
articles would not hurt nation of
security but merely provide an
insight into the previously clo sfd
activities of the U.S. govern-
ment in the Indochina conflict.
The Post series is being dis-
tributed to 30 subscribers of the
Los Angeles Times-Washington
Post news service, which will be
able to publish it simultaneously.
The Post's decision to run t'e
series underscored the wide op-
position of the nation's press to
the government's efforts to sup-
press the publication of the Pen-
tagon study.'
In answering the dispute, the
Post has forced the government
to battle what many consider toe
two most prestigious newspaper;f
in the United States.
High officials at the Pcst re-
fused yesterday to reveal tho
source of their copy of the Peuta-
gon report, but said it was ob-

'U' to review Clark case

(Continued from page 1)
position of direct give and take
as would be normally a part of
a collective decision."
Further, the commission would
like to see such cases handled
by an impartial committee ra-
ther than the present one, which
is what James Thiry, manager
of employe relations, character-
izes as a "management review of
a management decision."
Commission member Barbara
Murphy said yesterday an "im-
partial cor mmittee will get
around the problem of having
the decision reviewed by pre-
cisely those people who were re-
Meet goes on
Contimied fron Page 3,
!ally vocal in their criticism.
terming the proposal "frankly
ridiculous" for the Chicago cam-
pus.
Professors at so-called "elite"
universitys such as Chicago, they
said, belong more to a class of
"individual enterpeneurs" than
a working class.
Working to increase the rower
of such a group would run coul-
tee to the goals of NUC, they
argued.
Out of the debate came a plan
by the Chicago delegates to
amend the proposal to leave it
up to the judgment of the local
chapters whether support of fac-
ulty unions in their area was
"progressive".
The amendment satisfied most
of the objections, and the pro-
posal was easily passed.
Another pioposal for the es-
tablishment of Campus Indus-
trial Unions discussed Thurs-
day was tabled for one year by
a vote of 143 to 93.
The proposal would have es-
tablished NUC sanction and
support for a program of organ-
izing working class students into
groups structured along indus-
trial union lines,
Opposition to the proposal
came mostly as a result of the
rather vague terms in which it
was couched.
Several delegates led a move
to table the proposal for one
year effectively killing it, on the
basis that proponents of the
plan are "asking us (delegates)
to endorse a structure, not a
program".
The convention will continue
tomorrow with discussion to
center around the People's Peace
Treaty, the situation in the Mid-
dle East, and racial tensions in
Cairo, Illinois.

sponsible for the decision in the
first place."
Fleming's statement yesterday
agreed with the women's com-
mission's charges, stating that
"fair and objective procedures
must be established for the
Clark case and for any future
cases," and deciding to have fur-
ther hearings on the case.
Fleming 'however, disputed
charges by the commission that
the justification for the decis-
ion was invalid.
The commission letter main-
tains that "different values of
criteria such as education, train-
ing and experience" must be "re-
lated to the job at hand."
"Further," the letter states.
"it is the obligation of the Uni-
versity, not of the grievant, to
prove the relevance of those cri-
teria used to justify salary dif-
ferential. If this is not done ti
the satisfaction of an impartial
judge, and a salary differential
between male and female peers
persists, then redress is manda-
tory. In the case of Clark, le
concept of job relevant criteria
was not fully utilized, not was
there proof that salary dillfer-
entials betweenhClaik and fir
male peers were established on
the basis of su'h job relivant
criteria."
Fleming's statement, on the
other hand; contended t h a t
"long-standing practices of any
university in the administration
of its personnel provide payment
of different salaries to persons
with different academic degree
levels although they are doing
what the "industrial world would
call 'the same job' ". He gave as
an example the different pay
scales of a prof. and assistant,
prof. Though, the two might
substantially be doing the same
work, he said, it is well known
that the full prof. will get paid
nore.
Murphy objected to this ex-
ample sayingethere is a differ-
ence of "relevant job criteria"
between teaching staff and non-
teaching staff.
"If a person has a dental de-
gree and is working as a secre-
tary, he should not get paid
more for having that degree, but
rather get paid as a secretary.
If he were working as a den-
tist, however, then education
be important," Murphy said.
We hope the University will
not participate in the patterns
of discrimination of the larger
society, but rather be in the
vanguard of providing equal em-
ployment opportunities," Mur-
phy said.

tained Wednesday, the day aber
the Times was ordered to stop
its series.
A team of seven reporter's 'wa
quickly sequestered at a loca-
tion away from the Posts's main
offices. It began writing the ser-
ies early Thursday mo+nirg in
preparation for yesterday's issue.
according to Post officiati.
However, the initial article
was kept out of the first two edi-
tions of yesterday's issue a high
Post official said. in orde. to pr-e-
vent the government fror find-
ing out about the series early
enough to obtain a restraining
order barring disr 'ihuloin of the
paper.
In an interview, Patterson told
The Daily that the decissa to
publish the series caet- after the
newspaper's attorneys had urged
against publication.
According to Paterson, the
attorneys argued that the Post
would be in a poor legal positin
if it violated the gpirit of the t r,-
porary restraining rde".' agamsmt
the Times.
What finally prevails .1, Pattei-
son said, was the editor': be-i !
that the courts would uliumaety
decide that the Post and 'y
other newspaper bil the r:ghf to
determine w h a t inform?,ion
should be brought to its readers,
except if it violates na'.ional -
curity.
"The governm-nt think, it
should decide viiit iniormi' us
is in the national inter'st," Pat-
terson said. "We th ;k" rhv
a right and oblig urtn to d thi
when we comei per impo"A.
information."
The Post's official statement.
prepared by executive editor
Benamin Bradlee and publisher
Katherine Graham. said, "We
carefully examined all the ma-
terial available to us and con-
cluded that we had an obliga-
tion to our readers to publish
this story which contains im-
portant information on the his-
tory of our involvement in Viet-
nam and which in our opinion
does not reveal information
which could be used to the in-
jury of the United States or to
the advantage of any foreign
iration.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
MONDAYJUNE 1
senate Assemy Meeting: Dow Acid.,
Towsley Center (Entrance on E. iosp.
Dr., 3:15 pm.
Foreigitn Visitors
Following individuals can be reached
ithroughthie Foreign Visitor Div., rows
22-24, Miech. PUrse, 7a4-li48s Conasss
Bauer. Argentina. BohdanG linski,
Warsaw. Poland, June 20-26.

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. HURON
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-"Growth in the Spirit,
Calvin S Malefyt
6:00 p.m.-Picnic and Hymn Sing.
Phone 764-0558 to Subscribe to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
P DIAL. 5-629"
DOORS OPEN 12:45
603 E. Liberty Shows at 1 -3-5-7-9
"REWARDING,
ABSORBING! A tender, funny,
realistic story !"-Long Island Press

4

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JENNIFER O'NEILL'- GARY GRIMES'- JERRY HOUSER 'OLIVER CONANT
Written by Produced by Directed by Music by
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The complete sound track music by Mihe Legrand TECHMMCOWs R
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