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June 19, 1971 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-06-19

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, June 19, 1971

Poge wo TH MICHGAN OILY Sturda. Jun 9.17

7

Aborti
From Wire Service Reports
Backers of Michigan's abortion
law reform have launched a cam-
paign to bring the controversial
issue before Michigan voters byF
the 1972aPresidential election.
The action by Sens. Gilbert
Bursley R-Ann Arbor), and John
McCauley, (D-Grosse Islet, all
but writes off chances for House
approval of the reform bill passed
by the State Senate last March.
Bursley said the main questin
Is whether to seek a constitution-
al amendment, initiative petition
to the Legislature or both. Prr-
liminary drafts of a proposed pet-
tition are being reviewed now by
lawyers, he said.
Bursley also said that a peti-
tion drive to gain the 300,000-
signatures necessary to put abor-
tion on the ballot will begin
within two or three weeks.
But it is possible that new de-
velopments could force a change
in legislative action before fall.
One possibility being talked
about was Senate action to pass
a new bill or amend an appro-
priate bill from either the hoise
or Senate.
Sen. Richard Allen. (R-tthaca)
pledged as much Tuesday in a
floor speech asking teat the bill
be let out of the House Commit-
tee.

on reformers
"There will be other discharge list of other bills, mcst of th,
moves, other bills introduced. of special interest t particul
amendments to bills in various lawmakers, thot have not coz
locations and other moves as yet out of committee.
unforseen," said Allen. Although he didn't say as in
Offering amendments to o ):er his recitation carried vagueb
bills would keep abortion backers real hints of repris ai thns
away from the procedural and
political intricacies that doomed exercise of influence to blo
them to an expected defeat Tues- these measures.
day. A move to get abortion re- On the other hand, Rep. Ph
form out of a hostile House con- lip Mastin, (D-Oak Park), t
mittee failed 59-40 Tuesday. the House he pushed for the d
Amendments would not fac, the charge because only passage th
automatic opposition that uni- summer allowed the issue to:
formly arises on both sides for a on the ballot this fall. Backe
vote to overturn a committee its failed in committee when th
chairman and traditional politi- tried to add an amendment
cal maneuvering. that effect.
Closely watched House rules Rep. Roy Spencer, GOP nin
forbade debate Tuesday about ity floor leader, appealed to S
whether a Micitgan woman publicans to support aborti
should - as the bill provides - reformas "a sue whi
be allowed an abortion for any reform as 'oans oue which t
reason within the first 90 days governor has s for and ca
of her pregnancy if she had been paignefr.
a State resident that long. In Tuesday's roll call vol
Such debate limits were in ef- Democrats voted against deba
feet because the issue was not by a 41-9 margin. Republica
the bill itself, but getting it out favored letting the bill out
of the Social Services and Cor- committee 31-18.
rection Committee. While Bursley, Allen and M
Speaker of the House William Cauley confidenty =;redict
Ryan is in favor of the bill re- that 75 per cent of Michigan ci
maining in Committee. Ryan, zens favor reform, they dou
speaking at length against the that the pending bill could pa
bill and discharge ticked off a th - i

to
lar
me
ch.
gh
ck
il-
cld
is-
his
go
ers
ey
to
or-
le-
ion
he
lm
Ite,
ate
ns
of
tc-
ed
tt-
abt
ss5
dnt

seek '72 vote
BERKELEY VOTE
Law firm proposition
wins student approval

By JIM IRWIN
Financing of a nonprofit law
firm to deal with public interest
issues, such as consumer pro-
tection and industrial pollution,
has been approved by students at
the University -of California at
Berkeley.
Over 4,000 students voted to
assess themselves $1.50 a quarter
to finance the law firm, but the
plan still needs approval of the
university's regents,
The financing plan would net
an estimated $100,000 for the
firm called Citizens-Act on Law
Advocates or CAL Advocates.
Initial activity to start the firm
has already been funded by con-
tributions, including approxi-
mately $1,500 from Ralph Nader. -
Only 6,145 of Berkeley's 28,000
students voted, with 4,352 in fav-
or and 1,793 opposed.
Ray Bourhis, a law student who
conceived the idea, predicted ap-
proval by the regents and said
the fee plan is voluntary and
those against it do not have to
contribute.
According to Bourhis, CAL
Advocates will hire five to seven
full-time lawyers, at $10,000 to
$12,000 annually, to conduct in-
vestigations and bring legal ac-
tion where feasible.
Pollution, automobile insur-
ance and advertising practices
are among the fields that will re-
ceive the greatest attention, he
said.
He added that eomplainis
would first be taken to proper
state or federal agencies and
then to courts if no relief was
obtained.
Bourhis said that eventually it

E.
FOOD TOO!'
ITALIAN SAUSAGE:
Home-mdegrilled peppers
Topped with Italian
Meat Sauce 95
ITALIAN GRINDER: $1.00
imported Ham, Genoa Salami, Provolone Cheese,
Italian Ham, Lettuce, Tomato, Oil and Vinegar Spices
all sandwiches served with chips and pickle

Le noose-even ii gut arouna
the committee roadbloca - nor
could it again muster a majority
in the Senate, which gave it only
the minimum 2-vote majority
necessary to approve the issue
several months ago.
Folklore Society
Meeting
Sunday, June 20
7 P.M.
826 Tappan
Followed by a Hoot
Bring Instruments
For Info, Call Nancy--
761-3125

WORSHIP

is hoped that attorney fees or
damages assessed in cases won
by CAL Advocates will supplant
support proyided by the student
assessments.
Looking into the future, Bour-
his said, "What we're talking
about is a huge network of pub-
lic interest law firms to provide
representation for a group of
people never before given repre-
sentation in court in seeking in-
junctive relief-the general pub-
lie.
A similar firm has already
been set up at the University of
California at Los Angeles and
another proposed for San Jose
State College and the University
of Santa Clara combined. Bour-
his said discussions are also go-
ing on with student groups at
Yale and New York University.
'I think this vote demnstrates
that students are beginning to
realize there are some very spe-
cific ways they can be effective
in promoting social change,"
Bourheis commented.
%W m in debt
to
wars,
floods,
health
lie sa~rnng
and
blood banks.
V*fferian Wd os
'I
No
$1.50&3
folk legacy
rec. artist
SARA GREY
banjo &
unaccompanied
AMERICAN &
BRITISH ISLES

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.--Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years),
WEDNESDAY
8:00 p.m.-Testimony Meeting.
Infants room avilable Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Truth That Heals," Radio WAAM, 1600,
Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 668-6427.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Woshtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:45 a.m.-Bible Class.
Sunday at 11:00 a.m.-Service.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner Sense.and William Sts.
Rev.Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
10:00 am.-Sunday School,
10:00 a.m.-Service: "From a Son's Point of
View," Rev, Ronald C. Phillips.
There is infant and toddler care in the nursery.,

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
10:00Fam.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover Rupert
"Faith Has the Answer: At the tnd of
Our Tether."
Broadast WNRS 1290 AM, WNRZ 103 FM,
11-:00 to noon.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.-Speaking:
Mr. Sanders.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized,
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone '665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
10:00 a.m. - Worship Service and Church
School.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
801 S. Forest
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY
9:30 p.m.-The Liturgy of Light and Dark-
ness. (What the light often hides, the
darkness often reveals.)
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Corner of Forest and Washtenaw
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:00 p.m. - Evening Celebration. Guest
speaker: Rev. Sidney Draayer.
UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
310 S. State St.
Phone 663-4314
Marlyn William White, Minister
Ron Johnson, Associate Minister
Sunday, June 20, 11:00 a.m.-Special Folk
Service at YM-YWCA, 350 S. Fifth Ave.
Mr. Ron Johnson, Associate Minister, will
speak on "Celebration of Life."
Everyone is welcome.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor-971-3152
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-1i1:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Training Hour-6:00 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
Sunday at 11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion,

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