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June 17, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-06-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Poge Six

TE MICIGANDAtIY

Thursday, June 17., 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, June 17,, 1971

Key witness refuses

(Continued from Page 3)
routed out when police fired a
tear gas barrage into the house.
The prosecution has been try-
ing to prove that the Panthers
had conspired to kill Detroit
policemen on a large scale -
introducing Panther literature
with such inscriptions as "off
the pig" as evidence.
Defense attorney Neal Bush
said, however, that the prosecu-
tion has been unable to intro-
duce any evidence to prove
which one, if any, of the de-
fendants on trial conspired to,
or murdered Smith. "They can-
not ascribe any individual guilt,"
he said,
Lee's refusal to testify, Bush
added, destroys the prosecu-
tion's case.
So far, Bush noted, the ma-
jor prosecution testimony has
come from two policemen.
One, Frank Randazzo, testi-
fied the shot which killed Smith
was fired from a rifle he saw

come out of the window of the
Panther house.
However, Bush said, his part-
ner later testified that at the
time the shot was fired, he
thought Randazzo was crawling
down the street. As a result,
the defense claimed, he could
not have seen the incident.
The defense has contended
that the shots could just as
easily have come from a vacant
house two doors away from the
Panther house. It was well
known, they alleged, that others
in the neighborhood had guns.
Further, a few minutes after
Smith was shot, two men were
reportedly seen running down
the street, who the defense
claims,ralso could beresponsible
for the shots.
The prosecuting a tto rn eys
could not be reached for com-
ment.
The prosecution is about ready
to conclude their case and the

to testify
defense should begin to present
its side in about a week.
During the trial, the court-
room has retained a relaxed at-
mosphere -different from vir-
tually all other Panther trials
throughout the nation. There
are only a few policemen in the
courtroom and there have been
no outbursts from any of the
defendants.
"The defendants are disci-
plined because they know they
are innocent and expect to win,"
said Bush.
Of the 15 Panthers originally
arrested, 12 are on trial in De-
troit Recorder's Court for con-
spiracy to murder. Besides Lee,
one case was referred to Juve-
nile Court and a woman's case
was postponed. The t h r e e
Panthers who remained in the
house until after the tear gas
barrage are charged with assault
with intent to kill in addition
to the conspiracy charge.
Daily Official Bulletin
THURSDAY, JUNE 17
Day Calendar
Iaternational Center: International
Tes, 643 E. Madisn, 4:30 p.
American Heritage Night: A l a s k a
Mich." League Cafeteria, 5 p.m.
Spring Film Festival: "2001: A Space
Odyssey," And. A, Angell Hall, 7, 10
FOREIGN VISITORS
Following person can be reached
through the Foreign Visitor Div., Rms.
22-24, Mich. Union, 764-2148: Pent. H.
Seki, Internatlgel., Tokyo U n 1.
Japan, June 16-17.
375-M. MAE AD.
789130~-
NOW SHOWING
"Mtkiing
WEEKNIGHTS
7:25-9:20 -
SAT. & SUN.
200 400-5:20
7:594

Committee aids students

(Continued from Page 3)
In early 1970, a survey con-
ducted by the committee indi-
cated that most underclass men
and women were dissatisfied with
the college learning experience.
Reasons cited most often were
b o r e d o m with introductory
courses (which often repeated
material taught in high school),
frustration at being closed out of
courses, and a lack of knowl-
edge of special academically-
oriented programs such as "Pro-
ject Outreach."
This led to an Investigation
of possible alternatives to the
University's academic system.
Draft bill fails
(Continued from page 1)
Four Republicans who had
been considered undecided back-
ed the Chiles amendment, in-
cluding Sens. Milton Young (R-
ND.), Charles Percy (H-Ill.),
Robert Packwood (R-Ore., .nd
Ted Stevens (R-Alaska). Only
Percy and Young supported the
Hatfield-McGovern amendment.
Young, s e n i o r Republican
member of the Appropriations
Committee, said he hadadecided
"with great reluctance and r f-
ter long, thoughtful and prayer-
ful consideration" to support
amendments "which could with
all of their undesirable features
hasten the end of this war.
hi
tonight
MARC
CHOVER
blues &
ragtime
75c
14 1 Hil STRET

Possible solutions suggested by
the -committee include:
-An expanded independent
study program, developed to
allow students to be more re-
sponsible for their own educa-
tion;
-Opportunities f o r students
to receive extra credits within
courses when they do an amount
of work far exceeding that re-
quired for the course;
-A revamping of introduc-
tory courses based on sugges-
tions by both students in the
courses and the professors who
teach them;
-T h e institution of new
teaching techniques-most not-
ably the method called "self-
paced supervised study-which
would allow students to progress
at their own rate;
-Expanded opportunities for
field study; and
-The institution of a career
counseling center for freshmen
and sophomores at placement
service.

By The Associated Press
ASIAN COUNTRIES must improve their existing methods of or-
ganic farming rather than depending on western technology, an
Indian agronomist, told participants at the University's Conference
on Asian Environments yesterday.
Kusim Nair, agricultural expert with the Center for Asian Studies
at Michigan State University, said that "the methods of modern tech-
nology must be adapted to the realities of Asian environments, both
economic and ecological."
She explained that western fertilizers and insecticides, in addition
to their prohibitive costs, are "powerful pollutants."
MICHIGAN'S ABORTION REFORM BATTLE may be solved by
placing the issue on the 1972 presidential election ballot.
Sen. Gilbert Bursley (R-Ann Arbor), sponsor of the Senate-
approved abortion bill now stalled in the House, said he has the names
of more than 1,000 volunteers willing to circulate petitions aimed at
the ballot designation.
He said it would take some 300,000 signatures for a constitutional
amendment and roughly 250,000 for a legislative referendum.
DETROIT OFFICIALS have agreed to keep Balduck Park-on
the city's East side-open to young people under a provisional agree-
ment.
Under the pact, the park, which was the scene of four nights of
clashes between youths and police last summer, will be patrolled
by young marshalls in an effort to keep noise levels down and reduce
the visibility of drug sales in the park.
One youth involved in the negotiations said that hard-drug pushers
would be asked to leave the park, but if they persisted, their names
would be published in two Detroit area underground papers.
WINNER OF 2 ACADEMY AWARDS!
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR- JOHN MILLS
BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
"****l A MASTERPIECE! A BEAUTIFUL PICTURE!"
Waa aale, New York Daly News
4Wr" David Lean's Film of
RTMHL HONARD"CHST RJONES 5P
JONMLS- LO KRNod SARAN MILtS
DIAL 5-6290 SNOWS AT
EN DS 2 :30-5 :35-
TONIGHT 8: 45
FRIDAY: "SUMMER OF 42"
TONIGHT & TOMORROW NIGHT ONLY
'2001: A Space Odyssey,' provides
the screen with some of the most
dazzling visual happenings and
technical achievements in the
history of the motion picture!"
-ime Magazine

t

NEXT TUESDAY-JUNE 22
Lewis Milestone's classic anti-war film
All Quiet on the Western f ront
Winner of two Academy Awards (1930)
BEST PICTURE and BEST DIRECTOR
auditorium a 7:00 and 9:30 p.m.
angell hall 75c
presented by the ann arbor film cooperative
('ea~s e9Ia #ae
OPEN EVERY
SAT. & SUN.,
10to6orlater
6780 JACKSON RD., U
ANN ARBOR
(About 4 mi. west of Ann Arbor.
I 94 west take Zeeb Rd. exit to
Jackson Rd., then west 1 mile)
V Antiques, junk treasures-anything and everything that's sell-
able. Furniture, dishes, toys, bottles, jars, old guns, old knives,
books, postcards, prints, engravings. Good variety, different every
week. V
SELLERS WANTED. Rates: toble $5 or booth $10 per day inside;
outside set-up $5 per day. Open 7 a.m. to sellers. NO RESERVA-
TIONS NECESSARY!
COME BUY! COME SELL! COME!
EUROPE $199
SPONSORED BY UAC
Flt. Ados.
Car. Seats Plane No. Routing Dep. Ret. Cost Chg. Total*
CAL 186 B-707 001 DET/LON/DET 6/28 8/28 $205 $14 $219
CAL 106 0-707 052 PET/LOS/PET 6/29 8/26 $205 914 $219
CAL 186 B-707 010 DET/LON/DET 7/2 8/19 $205 $14 $219
CAP 250 DC-8 051 DET/LON/DET 8/1 9/1 $200 $19 $219
NEW YORK DEPARTURES
CAL 52 0 -707 014 NY/LOS/NY 5/31 8/12 $177 $24 $101
CAL 93 B-707 020 NY/LON/NY 6/12 8/12 $180 $19 $199
CAL 93 B-707 013 NY/LON/NY 6/29 7/30 $185 $24 $209
aPes rosa costs subject to iorease or decrease depending on the num-
bee o1 partcits.
Contact: UAC TRAVEL
2nd floor-Student Union
763-2147 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
Open only to UM students, faculty, staff, and immediate families
Administrative services by STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL

p

-a,

SUPER PANAVISION' a METROCOLOR
so MGM

AUD. A
ANGELL HALL

SHOWN AT
7 & 10 P.M.

NOTE: Tickets for both shows will be on sale outside
Aud. A at 5:30 P.M. It is suggested that tickets be
purchased well in advance and that ticket holders
arrive no later than 10 min, before show time.

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