100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 12, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-06-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

QUESTION OF LEGITIMACY
Third parties struggle to get on ballots

o 00d Its
Fried Chicken
Lunch 894
3035 Washtenaw across from Lee Oldsmobile
HI-Fl STUDIO
ANNUAL ,SUMMER SALE
Offering REAL price reductions that
will not be repeated in 1971-START-
I NG NOW
Some of our lines
* Jensen 0 Acoustic Research
* Garrard 0 Kenwood
" KLH s DUAL
* Scott 0 Sherwood
* Sony
Tel. 668-7942
Unbelievable Sacrifices-Up to 40/ off
Backed up by our Factory Authorized Service
121 W. WASH INGTON-Downtown--l blk, W. of Main

(Continued from Page 3)
alities of Michigan politics as
Zolton Ferency, former Demo-
cratic candidate for governor,
have linked their names with the
effort.
The Human Rights Party, like
other such parties, presently sees
as its major objective gaining
ballot recognition as a prerequi-
site to serious electoral work.
Party leaders say the ballot
campaign is underway and hope
to have the necessary 15,000
signatures by September.
Radicals at many universities
around the nation are following
the trend toward electoral poli-
tics by establishing alternative
parties in an attempt to gain
control of their city govern-
ments.
In Berkeley, Calif., an ad-hoc
coalition between a predomi-
nantly white group called the
April Coalition and the predomi-
nantly black Black Caucus, has
managed to win seats for three
radical candidates on the city's
eight man council.
In Madison, Wis., also a uni-
versity community, the radical
Wisconsin Alliance Party has
experienced considerable success
in recent years in electing mem-
bers to the city council.-
Here in Ann Arbor, the last
city election was marked by the
entry on the scene of a newly
formed third party-RIP.
ECONOMY
Jet Flights to Europe
One Way and
Round Trips to London
Charters within Europe-Inter-
national Student ID's-Motor-
cycle Purchase & Transportation
Package
EUROFLIGHT, INC.
Room 313
370 Lexington Ave., N.Y.
Tel. 212-725-8350/8418, 9

Plagued by problems of or-
ganization and the perennial
hassle of not having a place on
the ballot, however the party
was able to muster only about
200 votes.
Like other parties lacking bal-
lot recognition, RIP is now turn-
ing its attentions to gaining a
position on the city ballot,
through the commtssion. and on
the state ballot by gaining
necessary signatures.
In an attempt to gather all
the separate alternative parties
around the nation into one na-
tional alliance for the 1972 elec-_
Lions a meeting is being held
July 3-6 in Albuquerque, N.M.
The meeting will be attended
by delegates from the New
Party, the Peace and Freedom
Party, Michigan's Human Rights
Party, RIP and many others.
The purpose of the gathering
is to decide on a preliminary
platform for the national party.
Meetings will also be held to
d i s c u s s national coordination
and gaining ballot positions in
all 50 states.
Neither of these goals have
been achieved by leftist third
party presidential campaigns of
recent years, and both are es-
sential for a serious and lasting
political presence.
In Ann Arbor and other
cities across the nation fledgling
political parties such as RIP are
viewing with interest these pro-
ceedings while concentrating on
local grass roots organization.

As one RIP member put it,
they're "exploring the possibility
of mergers but are far from any
decision on it."
Couneil to vote
on Briarwood
(Contnued from Pageit
other construction plans withii
the city. It requires builders to
devise a program seeking mor'
workers from minority groups
submit it to city officials. LasI
Monday, the council apptbved on
first reading an amendment to
the ordinance authorizing the is-
suance of "stop-work" orders to
builders who fail to live up to
their agreement.
Part of the caution ciaracter-
izing the negotiations is due to
the uniqueness of the project.
Containing one million squt, re
feet of floor space, Briarwood
would be one of the largest cen-
ters of its kind and draw custo-
mers tram metropolitan Detroit
as welt as Ann Arbor. It is also
recognized that Briarwood would
hurt Ann Arbor's central busi-
ness district-another cause of
early oppositiorr to th" project's
initiation.
Monday's vote will corne in
two phases. one cov.nring the
change to- the C2B onnetcial
zoning for the center itself sand
another AG agriculturally-hetd-
ing zone for the land surroundig
the center.

0

Lawyer questions legitimacy
of Detroit grand jury probe

"TAKING OFF" THE YEAR'S MOST CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED
PICTURE HAS WON THE COVETED
JURY PRIZE AWARD
AT THE CANNES INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL COMPETING WITH
THE BEST PICTURES PRODUCED THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
"ONE OF THE BEST AMERICAN FILMS
YOU'RE GOING TO SEE IN 1971"
-Joseph Gelmis, NEWSDAY
"I wish there was a funnier word for funny."
Gene Shat t, NBC-TV
"Wise, Witty and Entertaining! What a
Difference Warmth and Understanding Make!"
--Hollis Alpert, SATURDAY REVIEW
"A NEARLY FAULTLESS COMEDY! NOTHING SHORT OF A
MIRACLE! IT TOUCHES US MORE DEEPLY THAN WE WOULD
HAVE BELIEVED POSSIBLE THESE DAYS!"
- -Richard Schickel, LIFE
"Recklessly 'Fresh
Funny" where are the and
New Yorker meIbers of the ilt
Nw Yk P- SEEC**0 -pted
"Sheer Taking "Mios
Brilliance, Forman has
Subtle a deit way
Comedy - around
Stinfgeit ) SOCIETY FOR THE PARENTS OF FUGITIVE CHILDREN. funny-
Ironies!" tl] ~ bn!
New Yorke --WIN_
starring BUCK HENRY and LYNN CARLIN
by MILOS FORMAN, director of 'LOVES OF A BLONDE' and 'FIREMEN'S BALL'
Frida y-J:159 9:00, 10:45
Saturda -2:30, 4:00, 5:30, Fri. and Sot. evenings-$2.50
7:15, 9:00, 10:45 Sat. matinees-$1.75
Sundav-2:30, 4:00, 5:30, O FIFTH ForUM all other times--$2.00
7:15,9:00 jjj, A@NgATL7Er

(Continued from Page 1)
$25,000 personal bond, tas to
have appeared at the conference.
But Kelley said he obtained court
permission to return to Indiana
to attend to pressingbusiness.
Yesterday Mitchell defended
the Nixon administration's policy
a usingvwiretaps in domestic
subversive cases withottt prior
court approval, maintaining that
electronic surveillance "has been
a vital part of the government's
defense against subversion for
three decades."
Addressing the Virginia Bar
Association, Mitchell said thh no-
tion has never before faced "so
many revolutionary elements de-

termined to destroy by force the
government and the society it
stands for."
"The threat to our society
from so called 'domestic subver-
sion' is as serious as any threat
from abroad," he said.
. "These 'domestic' forces are
ideologically and in many cases
directly connected with foreign
interests." Mitchell said.
The governmentt now is appeal-
ing to the Supreme Court an Ap-
peals Court ruling that electronic
surveillance of domestic grops
is unconstitutional without a
court warrant obtained in ad-
vance.

->*D eyODY5Y*o
Monday! 9:30-:00 A.M.
TOM CROCKER
folk rock
No cover-no increase
a 208 W. Huron
oa
EUROPE $199
SPONSORED BY UAC
Fit. Adma.
Car. Seats Plane No. Routing Dep. Ret. Cost Chg. Total*
CAL 186 B-707 001 DET/LON/DET 6/28 8/28 $205 $14 $219
CAL 186 B-707 002 DET/LON/DET 6/29. 8/26 $205 $14 $219
CAL 186 B-707 010 DET/LON/DET 7/2 8/19 $205 $14 $219
CAP 250 DC-8 051 DET/LON/DET 8/1 9'1 $200 $19 $219
NEW YORK DEPARTURES
CAL '$B 0-707 014 NY/LON/NY .5/31 8/13 $175 $24 $190
CAL 93 B-707 020 NY/LON/NY 6/12 8/12 $180 $19 $199
CAL 93B -707 013 NY/LON/NY 6/29 7/30 $185 $24 $209
Pro rata costs sutject to increase or decrease depending on th 00 um-
ber of participants,
Contact: UAC TRAVEL
2nd floor--Student Union
763-2147 11 a m.-4 p.m.
Open only to UM students, faculty, staff, and immediate families
Administrative services by STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL

d'

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan