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June 10, 1971 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-06-10

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Thursday, June 10, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thrdy, ue,,17 HEMCIA AL aeNn

Senate reduces
draft call ceiling

FLARES
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and plaids.
In Double Knit
Polye ter
$18

WASHINGTON (A) - In a vote
on a draft bill amendment yes-
terday, the Senate decided I
lower by 10 per cent the proposed
ceiling in the number of men who
can be drafted in the next two
years.
The provision passed also in-
cluded a specification stating
that the President must seek
congressional approval if he
wants to draft more than the pre-
scribed number of men.
The proposed ceiling, 270,000
in the two year period beginning
July 1, is considered to be well
above the number who will ac-
tually be drafted under present
plans.
In voting for the first congres-

sional ceilings on the draft since
1940, the Senate rejected a move
to set an even lower limit of
100,000 next year and 60,000 in
the following year.
Sen. Robert Taft Jr. (R-Ohio)
said the lower numbers would
be more in accord with the likely
draft calls as the administration
heads toward its goal of phasing
out the draft by mid-1973.
The Pentagon meanwhile said
that Senate approval of a $2.7-
billion military pay increase, far
beyond the $1 billion asked by the
administration but close to what
the House voted, would require
cuts in defense contracts, per-
sonnel totals and military bases
unless extra money is voted.

Farewell, sweet bird of youth
Tricia Nixon poses anxiously with her husband-to-be, Edward
Finch "Fast Eddie" Cox as their nuptial night approaches this
Saturday. Already the couple face many problems, including a
cardboard wedding cake and a guest list that includes Ralph
Nader. Yesterday Cox declined comment on whether Tricia was
a "liberated woman."
June 17 deadline set
in New York walkout

NEW YORK (M) - As about
7,500 city strikers returned to
drawbridges and other munici-
pal installations yesterday, a
union of 150,000 state em-
ployes set a June 17 deadline
for a walkout,, with 38 mental
hospitals indicated as a prime
target.
The two-day strike was an ef-
fort by the AFL-CIO Munici-
pal Employes Union to force a
pension agreement on t h e
state legislature. It ended in a
compromise Tuesday n i g h t
after affecting not only draw-
bridlges, but sewage treatment
plants, garbage incinerators,
water supply and parks, and
* threatening grade school lunch-
rooms.
The threat of a statewide
strike came from the C i v i l
Service Employes Association,
and was aimed at blocking Gov.
Nelson A. Rockefeller's an -
nounced plan to lay off 8,200
state employes as an economy
measure.
The strike ended with an
agreement to submit the pen-
sion proposal anew to the 1972
legislature. If it again fails to
pass, the city and the union
would negotiate a method to
add the estimated $30 million
in pension costs to some other
segment of the contract and
thus sidestep the need for state
approval.
The municipal workers strike
Monday snarled traffic in the
area of the city's 29 drawbridg-
es. Most of them were locked
open by bridgetenders, w h o

then walked off the jobs.
Despite a state Supreme Court
back-to-work order, the strike
spread Tuesday to 2,000 sew-
age treatment plant employes,
300 incinerator workmen, and
50 drivers who deliver fto o d
staples to the city's grade school
lunchrooms.

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