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June 05, 1971 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-06-05

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Soturdoy, June 5, 1971

PaeTw ~l IHIA DIY audaJue5,17

I

- - - -1

Sorrow wins in all but acting

B
Th
well-
come
predi
first
toget
wouli
cent
Th
prese
que,
mons
ped
day
"Sch

in Player's Empire
:y MARCIA ABRAMSON fer disillusionment after disil-
.e Empire Builders is a lusionment that will leave her
staged and well-acted dark like them, as when Schmurz re-
dy of the absurd, if a bit jects her kindness.
ctable - after you put the The play is the chronicle of
few strange happenings the stripping away of the fam-
her, it's exactly what you ily's defenses. They move up
d expect from a fairly re- and up in their world, leaving
French play, nice flats for shabbier ones, los-
ing possessions and finally each
e unusual twist is the stage other, until Father gives it all
nce of Schmurz, a grotes- up and leaves via the only exit,
bandaged, and bloody a suicidal leap from a window.
ter who would have step- As the family, Ian Stulberg,
out of one of those Satur- Lisa Goodman, and Betsey Price
afternoon horror movies. were all very good, with Marcia
murz" means sorrows, and Vitiello doing a funny if expect-

Builders
ed characterization of a tough,
crabby old servant.
The main problem with t h e
play is that it drags - no fault
of the Residential College Sum-
mer Theatre. The third part,
where Father, left alone, is re-
duceo to madness, goes on and
on unnecessarily.
The effect is still chilling, as
the commonplace becomes bi-
zarre and then terrible, and the
RC group deserves the credit.
The final performance of The
Empire Builders will be tonight
at 8 p.m. in the East Quad Aud.

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in the end he conquers all.
Throughout the play, the
Father and Mother of t h i s
strange family abuse and beat
Schmurz, but their attempts
are futile. Their daughter tries
kindness, but is also brushed
back. There are no comprom-
ises with the ultimate sorrow
and terror of life.
Father and Mother are pa-
triotic creatures, given to pre-
tending all is well, children in
India are starving and look at
all we have. The daughter is
more independent; she can see
through their pretensions. But
her fate is uncertain. She is
locked out of their world, per-
haps dead, more likely to suf-

Phil Oehs: More
poetry than protest

By MARCIA ABRAMSON
Phil Ochs is not meant to
sound a still small voice in such
barns as Crisler Arena. Ochs be-
longs where you can see the man,
not just listen to the words.
Amazingly enough, the Poison
Apple in Detroit has decided to
become a folk bar featuring sing-
ers like Ochs, who is playing
this week, Tom Paxton, Tim

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE
SUMMER THEATER presents
THE EMPIRE BUILDERS
by BORIS VIAN
June 3-5-8:00 P.M.
EAST QUAD AUDITORIUM
75c DONATION

-- - ------ -- -

WORSHIP

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 am.- Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years)
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a.m.-Testimony Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Truth That Heals," Radio WAAM, 1600,
Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 662-0813.
ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
502 W. Huron
Sunday at 10:30 a.m.-Service.
Call 662-3841 for information.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Corner of Forest and Washtenaw
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Communion Service.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church--662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 a.m.--Children's Day Service.
11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover Rupert:
"Faith Has the Answer: In Our Conflict
With Change."
Broadcast WNRS 1290 AM, WNRZ 103 FM,
11 :00 to noon.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 am.-Speaking:
Elder Lawrence Farris.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
10:00 a.m.-Children's Day Service.
There is infant and toddler care in the nursery.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
10:00 a.m. - Worship Service and Church
School.

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
2141 Brockman, Ann Arbor-668-8715
Bishop's Phone-769-1574
Missionaries-761-1818
Sunday School-10:30 a.m.
Sacrament (Worship)-5:30 p m.
All are welcome.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-t.C.A.
801 S. Forest
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
7:00 a.m.-Worship and Breakfast-Island
Drive Park.
10:30 a.m.-Holy Communion.
MONDAY
8:00 p.m.-Study Session-"The Changing
Sensibilities of Mon."
WEDNESDAY
9:30 p.m.--Worship in Free-Form.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
Sunday at 11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor-971-3152
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Training Hour-6:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:45 a.m.-Bible Class.
Sunday at 11:00 a.m.-Service.

Hardin, John Hammond and
more who are scheduled to come.
This is the first time Detroit i
has had a place where you could
sit down at a table, have a few
drinks, and listen to Ochs (or any
of the others) in the small set-
ting that is best for them.
Ann Arbor had such a place in
Canterbury House; perhaps the
Poison Apple can fill in the void.
It is a comfortable place, deco-
rated in P-Bell rinky-tink.
To bring in Ochs et al, the
Poison Apple is charging $3.50
cover (14 on weekends) plus $1
and up for beer or drinks. The
price really isn't that steep, espe-
cially considering how readily
people are paying $3 or $4 and up
to sit on the top bier of Olym-
pia
As for Ochs-what can you
say? He is his records. More im-
portant, he is himself, like the
rest of us, a man who is a little
tired and more cynical than the
one who sang about Mississippi
and Santo Domingo.
Because the people wanted it,
he gave them "I Ain't Marchin'
Anymore" and "Love Me, I'm a
Liberal," with some new up-
dated verses-good ones, too-
about "Love me, I'm a radical."
But when he talked about the
Mississippi song, Phil Ochs ex-
plained that some people thought
it wasn't fair, and he said he
couldsee that, Thehardest ideal-
iam and bitterest satire mellow
with time and with the struggles
and defeats of the movement
Perhaps that is why Ochs
seemed to care most of all for
his timeless, beautiful, classic
songs like "Changes" "There
But for Fortune," and "Dance,
Dance, Dance"-not so much
protest as poetry.
Ochs' last song, "It Seems
Like There Are No More Songs,"
suggests that he is tiring, not
writing new songs. I did not see
all the show, but he sang mostly
old pieces when I was there.
Meanwhile, the Poison Apple is
the next best thing to having
Phil Ochs in your living room
SPOTTER'S
GUILD o
p Spring Sale p
SSunday, June 6
9:00 A.M.-3:00 P.
.2OHiI=
8 Ann Arbor 0

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