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June 04, 1971 - Image 12

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-06-04

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.Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, June 4, 1971

HOLTZMAN HOLDS REDS HITLESS

Ken Holtzman wraps his magic left arm around Danny Breeden (19)
as he is surrounded by joyous teammates after hurling a no-hitter,
making things difficult for photographers trying to snap Holtzman.
WEAKLY QUIZ
The Daily, recognizing that in the long stretch between Hoope
Pickings and Gridde Pickings, our readers must of necessity go with-
out Cottage Inn's World Famous Pizza, shipped daily direct from Pisa,
Italy, by steamboat, begins today a series of Weakly Quizzes.
Today's quiz is brief. The first person to send in the correct answer
will win the above-mentioned delicacy. The answer must be in writing..
No fair calling us up on the telephone. Also, you must give your correct
name on the paper; you can't stick somebody else with the prize.
What pitcher won 20 games with the highest earned run average
in the sports staff's memory? Hints: The year was 1959, and the earned
run average was a not-so-distinguished 4.07. The pitcher won 21 games
and lost 15.
Attached strings: You must give us the pitcher's first name. We
don't care about his last name. We don't even care if you can spell
his last name correctly. In the absence of a correct answer by the time
we decide to end the contest, the first properly spelled last name will
be accepted.
- - - ---- - -- --- -----
Stiekm.en .ated for
weekend Al-tar til

ny The Associated Press
CINCINNATI - Left-hander.
Ken Holtzman of the Chicago
Cubs pitched the first no-hitter
of the 1971 baseball season last
night beating the Cincinnati
Reds 1-0.
Hltzman, who pitched a no-
hitter for the Cubs two years
ago against the Atlanta Braves,
overcame periods of wildness for
his classic, and stifled the Reds,
mostly on ground balls.
Holtzman struck out six, walk-
ed four and kept Cincinnati's
fearsome Big Red Machine
pounding the ball to Cubs' in-
fielders as he weaved his way
out of jams caused by control
problems.
In order to nail down his no-
hitter in the ninth, Holtzman
had to face the top of the Reds'
powerful batting order.
Hal McRae made the first out,
flying out to John Callison on a
1-0 pitch. Then Tommy Helms
struck out on a 1-2 pitch after
fouling off one ball.
That brought up slugger Lee
May who ran the count to two
balls and two strikes before
striking out to end the game.
Holtzman scored the game's
only run in the third inning
when he led off and reached oi
Tony Perez' throwing error. The
pitcher moved up on Don Kes-
singer's infield out and then
scored on Glenn Beckert's line
single to right center.
Holtzman got into his tough-
est jam in the bottom of the
third when he walked Buddy
Bradford leading off. Bradford
moved up on a wild pitch and
then went to third as Dave Con-
ception grounded out.
That brought up pitcher Gary
Nolan, who bounced in front of
the plate. Catcher Danny Bree-
dan pounced on the ball and
tagged Nolan for the out, Brad-
ford remaining at third.
Holtzman then got McRae to
fly to center, stranding the run-
ner.
In the sixth, McRae walked
with one out and stole second.
But Helms lined out and May
bounced out. Then Holtzman
took control, retiring the Reds
in order over the last three in-
nings and retiring the last 11
men in order.
Red Sox stop Yanks
NEW YORK - Pitcher Ray
Culpa run-scoring single with
two out in the ninth inning last
night carried the Boston Red
Sox to a 3-2 victory over the
New York Yankees that snap-
ped their losing streak at five
games.
Culp's single scored Duane
Josephson, who had doubled, to
give the Red Sox a 3-1 lead and
they withstood a New York rally
in the bottom of the ninth for a
one-half game lead over idle

Baltimore in the American
League East.
Josephson cracked a leadoff
single off Mel Stottlemyre in tne
eighth, moved around to third
on a sacrifice bunt and wild
pitch and scored the tie-break-
ing run two-out on a single by
slump-ridden Carl Yastrzemski.
Cards clobber Bucs
PITTSBURGH - Steve Carl-
ton won his 10th game of the
season and helped his cause with
a two-run double as the St.
Louis Cardinals defeated Pitts-
burgh, 7-1, halting the Pirates'
five-game winning streak.
Carlton, 10-2, has won four
For moral guidance concern-
ing All-Star balloting and hot
tips on Joe Mullaney and the
Los Angeles Lakers, see page
eleven.
straight games. He was in early
trouble as the Pirates got four
of their seven hits in the first
three innings and scored a run.
But hetbreezed through the next
13 batters until Jose Pagain
singled in the eighth.
Braves bomb Astros
ATLANTA - Rank Aaroii'
pinchhit double down the
third base line broke a fourth-
inning deadlock last night as the
Atlanta Braves trimmed Hous-
ton 5-2 and ended Pat Jarvis
11-game losing streak. , '
Jarvis, 1-7, blanked the As-
tros over six innings after ;:e-
lieving starter Jim Nash with
one down in the first and the
Astros holding a 2-0 lead.
Aaron, out of the lineup be- CHICAGO CUBS southpaw1
cause of an ailing knee, sent the Holtzman leaps with joy a
Braves ahead 4-2 with his bases- throwing the first no-hitte
loaded smash just inside the the season, blanking the R
third base bag. 1-0.
Major League Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
East East
w L Pct. GB w i, Pet.
Boston 30 20 .600 - St. Louis 33 19 .635
Baltimore 28 19 .596 '. New York 29 18 .617
Detroit 27 23 .540 3 Pittsburgh 31 20 .608
New York 22 28 .440 8 Chicago 24 27 .471
Cleveland 21 27 .4388 Montreal 19 25 .432
Washington 19 30 .380 10?, Pliiladeliia 17 31 .354
West Wsvt
Oakland 34 18 .654 _ San Franirsco 37 16 .698
Kansas City 24 22 .522 7 Los Angeles 27 225 .519
Minnesota 26 25 .510 7> Houston 26 26 .500
California 24 28 .462 10 Atlanta 24 29 .453
Milwaukee 20 26 .435 11 Cincinnati 20 32 .385
Chicago 18 27 .400 12', San Diego 1 it35.314
Yestrdays ReultsYesterday's kesults
Yesteneiay's Hesslts Chicago 1, Cincinnati 0
Ohsten 3, New Yock uSt. Louis 7, Pittsburgh 1
ther clubs not scheduled. Atlanta 5, Houston 2
Today's Games Other clubs not scheduled.
California at Boston Today's Games
Oakland at Washington Chicago at Atlanta
Kansas City at New York St. Louis at Cincinnati
Detrit a ChiagoHouston at Pittsburgh
Detroit at Chicago Montreal at San Diego
Baltimore at Milwaukee New York at Los Angeles
Cleveland at Minnesota Philadelphia at San Francisco

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Ken
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eds,

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16t
20

Michigan's Palmer Field v ill
be the scene of some of the finest
lacrosse action in the country to-
morrow as the Midwest Lacrosse
Association presents ft's annual
All-Star game. The competition
will display the talents U the
best players from the fourteen
teams that make up the Associt-
tion.
The Michigan team, which won
the Association title during the
regular season with a 7-0 league
record while compiling a fine 8-1
season's mark, including upset
wins over nationally ranked Ohio
State and Bowling Green will
have eight of their fine players
taking part in the game, incltit-
ing next season's captains, Jay
Johnson and Dan Lamble.
Namath clear
NFL declares
NEW YORK -) - For the
second time in two years, Joe
Namath has cleared himself of
any involvement in the manage-
ment of Bachelors III to the
satisfaction of Commissioner
Pete Rozelle of the National
Football League.
Jim Kensil, executive director
of the NFL, said yesterday he
had talked with Namath's law-
yer, Jimmy Walsh, and been as-
sured that Namath no longer is
part of the management of the
East Side lounge.
Walsh had been quoted as
saying the New York Jets con-
troversial quarterback continued
as part of the over-all man-
agement unit of the four Bache-
lors III around the country.

Johnson, with a save percent-
age of .731 for the regular sea-
son will be in goal, while Lainble
will display his talent at the mid-
field position.
Other Michigan competitors
will be midfielders Dick Dean,
Sandy Ervin, and Don Dworsky,
defensemen Tim Cotter and Pete
Lodwick, and Roger Mills on at-
tack.
While Chicago's Hall Beckwith,
an All-American defenseman,
will aid Johnson in supplying a
staunch defense, the offense
seems to have the advantage
with stars like Ohio Umiversity's
Brian Teeple who carries a 4.4
scoring average and Columbus'
Tom Lyle who averaged 1.7 as-
sists per game.
Other players include mem-
bers of clubs representing Cleve-
land University of Cincinnati,
Notre Dame, Lorraine, Vander-
bilt, Wayne State, and West Vir-
ginia.
Lacrosse is one of the few
sports in which NCAA allows club
teams to compete with varsity
teams, hence Michigan has been
able to take on teams like Ohio
State's which fields a varsity
squad. However, club teams are
not allowed to be considered for
national rankings.
The action will begin at 2 p.m.
BILLBOARD
Beginning Friday night, June
4th, Waterman Gymnasium will
be open from 7 to 10 p.m. for co-
recreational activities.-

WHAT'S IN A NAME:
Is it Big Lew or Big Kareem?

41f

WASHINGTON (R) - Lew Al-
cindor, most valuable player in
the National Basketball Asso-
ciation, made it clear yesterday
that from now on he wants peo-
ple to call him Kareem Abdul
Jabbar, the Islamic name he
chose nearly three years ago.
The champion Milwaukee
Bucks' star made his declara-
tion at a news conference and
picture taking session during
which it was confirmed that Al-
cindor, his teammate, Oscar
Robertson, and Coach Larry
Costello, would take a 25-day
trip through Africa for the State
Department.
"I've been kind of quiet about
it uip to now," he said. -"Now
that I'm representing this coun-
try, I want to do it. When I'm
speaking to people and holding
news conferences, I want to use
my islamic name."
Alcindor said he didn't expect
the Bucks to change his name in
the prograom or their .advertising

"because I've become famous
with it. I do expect people to use
my Islamic name when they're
talking to me."
He repeatedly corrected news-
men who called him either
"Lew" or "Mr. Alcindor" in or-
der to ask a question. His reply
was "Kareem" or "Jabbar"
Alcindor said he made the
name change in the summer of
1968 when he converted from
Roman Catholicism to Islamic
and made it public in a two-part
series in Sports Illustrated in
1969.
The 7-foot-3 standout said Ka-
reem translates to "noble or
generous," Abdul is "servant of
allah," and Jabbar, "Powerful."
Alcindor said his bride of a
week, the former Janice Brown
of Los Angeles but now known
as "Habiba," would make the
tour with him through Algeria,
Senegal, Mai, Nigeria, Tanzania
and Somalia.

He said he was married in
Washington last Friday but did
not know where he and his wife
would make their home when the
State Department tour ends.
When he was asked where he
was married, since there was-no
license issued to him in the Dis-
trict of Columbia or its surround-
ing suburbs, he replied that he
did not need a license. .
"If I had been married as a
Christian or a Jew I would need
one, but I was married in a pri-
vate home under Islamic law."
Alcindor said he was not a
black Muslim as is former heav-
yweight champion Cassius Clay,
but a Sunni Orthodox "like the.
religion practiced in Pakistan."
During the State Department
tpur, the three Bucks will con-
duct coaching clinics, give exhi-
bitions on how to shoot the ball
and meet with the- players of
each of the six countries.

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