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May 19, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-05-19

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May 19, 1971

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, May 19, 1971

TODAY AT
113,5,7,
and 9 PM8-6416
"A MSTTUVIIECE
--HOLLIS ALPERT, Saturday Review
COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
BEMST JEAN-CLAUDE BRIALY.
nAF eby
PICTURE ERIC ROHMER
OFTHE g
Color
THURSDAY: ROLLING STONES IN "GIMME SHELTER"

SUMMER PROGRAM
Lack of funds imperils rock concerts

SUBSCRIBE T0 THE MICII!GAN DAILY
"EYE OPENING... TALK ABOUT A SWINGER"
Bob Salmaggi Group W Network
"WOMEN AND MEN LOVE 'RELATIONS'."
Show Magazine

"BREATHLESS"

N.Y. Times

EEE 1{SS{( pat4e 41
KEN

r

(Continued from Page 3
Lampe says that in addition to
the concerts they want to "util-
ize much more what the com-
munity gathering represents."
Thus, in conjunction with the
concerts, the council hopes to
make the Sunday afternoons a
total community project.
"We are planning on setting
aside a place where people can
bring things they have made
and sell them," Lampe says.
"Also, we hope to run the food
concessions ourselves and serve
good food, not just coke and ice
cream from vendors. Possibly we
will be able to arrange for com-
munity dinners," he adds.
In addition, the council is
planning ongoing educational
projects on drugs, health and
community resources.
"The concert provides a tre-
mendous opportunity of having
all those people there at once,
so we should be able to use that
community resource to better
the community. L a m p e says.
$150
Bill
Vanaver
"he's where
if's at in
-Michael Cooney
a virtuoso on
guitar, banjo,
tarobura, nd
funnybone
E0 J

. ,

Although the concerts are cost-
ing a lot of money, he adds, that
figure trims itself down when
one thinks that it is serving
100,000 people.
Concert organizer Steve Jo-
sephson adds that this year
they hope to increase security,
both internally and externally.
Most policing will be done by
Psychedelic Rangers, persons
employed by the council to get
traffic parked,.people into the
park, and to patrol the ground.
Organizers say the concerts
will most likely be held again in
Gallup Park and alternate sites.
The council has set its fund
raising goal at': $20,000. Their

Suit set. on police action

(Continued from Page 1)
The suit demands $«10,000 in
damages, the nullification of all
charges against the t5 persons
and destruction of all their ar-
rest and jail records.
T h e H o u s e investigating
panel's one dissendent, Rep.
Robert Drinan (D-Mass.), who
voted a g a in s t investigating
sponsors of the recent wave of
demonstrations in Washington,
said "I see tsp evidence, really,
no sufficient evidence that there
Strike ended
(Continued from page 1)
millions of Americans a n d
would, if it continued, sharply
curtail the current upturn in the
nation's economy," Nixon said.
"It is regrettable that Cost-
gress was forced to act in this
matter under the pressures of
an existing strike and mounting
harm to the nation," Nixon said
of the third nationwide rail
strike since 1967.
Nixon's proposed permanent
legislation would abolish the 45-
year-old Railway Labor Act and
bring rail and airline disputes
under Taft Hartley Law proced-
ures covering most other in-
dustries.
The period until Oct. 1 will be
used in attempts to negotiate
the rest of a 42-month contract
on the union's demands for a
total of 51.8 per cent in p a y
hikes above the current $3.78
average hourly wage. Hodgson
said they should settle for the
43-per-cent pattern accepted
earlier by most other rail un-
ions.
GOOD USED
BOOKS
PAPER BACKS
HARD COVERS
Wooden Spoon
Books
200 NO. 4TH AVE.
NOON TO SIX
WED. THRU SUNDAY

are subversive elements in this
peace movement. . The people
who planned the Mayday dem-
onstration are perhaps more
radical (than those who plan-
ned the April 24 demonstration).
but that does not mean that
they might be subversive."
Drinan also said that the at-
titude of the majority of the
committee towards the demon-
strations "ties in with their fix-
ationl on Commulisml."
"They theorize that since
these p eo p 1 e (the protesters)
want to terminate the war, and
thereby allegedly sell out to
Hanoi, there must be some Com-
munist elements," said Drinan.
Other committee m e m b e r s
said they doubt the demonstra-
tors had much of an impact on
the Nixon administration's Viet-
nam policy, "but they did strike
at the very foundation of our
society and that is the rule of
law.
"And I think the rule of law
was severely damaged by the
demonstrators because it is ab-
solutely impossible to preserve
the niceties of due process when
you arrest in excess of 12,000
persons," Chairman Ichord said.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
CIass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. subscription rates: $10 by
carrier,$10by mail.
summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subserip-
tion rates: $5 by carried, $5 by mai
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
All organizations that will be meet-
ing this summer, please contact the
Office for Student Organizations, Rm.
335, Michigan Union, 662-4431, ext. 335.
scottish Country Dancing for men
and women. Always open to beginners.
Instruction provided. Every Thursday,
730pm WAgym.
1/5 OF CPA'S IN USA
ARE FORMER STUDENTS OF
Becker CPA Review Course
DETROIT (313) 864-0128

4

first attempt at fund raising
was a radio marathon, last
week, which met with limited
success.
Other fund raising activities
include a live concert May 22 by
rock groups Teegarden and Van
Winkle and Bob Seeger. The
majority of all proceeds will go
towards the parks program.
There will also be, a flea
market on the Diag May 29-30.
Since there is no spring pick-
up this year, organizers are ask-
ing persons with any sellable
merchandise to call the parks
program office and they will
send p e o ple out to pick the
merchandise up.

persons under 18 7:15 and 9:00
not admitted
PIPTH POruV
-IT VNYA -01T

DIAL 662-6264 of
ASTATE -,LIBERTY STS.
HELD N W THE ELECTRIFYING OVER
BROADWAY HIT IS ON THE SCREEN!
SHOWS
OPEN The GreatWtHope AT
12:45 Lt1,3
7 & 9 P.M.U

1$

Ends DIAL
Thursday 5-6290
PLEASE NOTE TIME SCHEDULE
~~~~IS BEST!
BEST PICTURE
Winnerof
YAWARDS BEST ACTOR-
ACADEMY 3 BEST DIRECTOR
Shown Daily at 3:30 and 8:45
PLUS
M-A-S-H
Shown Daily at 1:35 and 6:45
COMING FRIDAY: "RYAN'S DAUGHTER"

IL

JAMES EAKL JUNES JANE ALEAANDEK
BEST ACTOR!-BEST ACTRESS!
BOTH ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEES THIS YEAR!

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