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May 18, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-05-18

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tujesdoy, May 18, 1971

Pane Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, May 18, 1971

Michigan Film Society presents
SOUTHERN DISCOMFORT
Abbey Lincoln and Ivan Dixon in
NOTHING BUT A MAN
white filmmakers/black cost 8 P.M.
ALSO Tony Richardson's
SANCTUARY
9:30 PM.
LEE REMICK, YVES MONTAND, ODETTA
from 2 novels by WILLIAM FAULKNER
TONIGHT, May 18
FRIENDS MEETING HOUSE 761-7849
1420 Hill7
NEXT WEEK: GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MATTHEW
SUBMARINES
also specializing in
roost beef and corned beef
Hungry.??.
BY ONE--GET ONE FREE
ANY OF MR. MINIS
MITE SUBMARINES
SOffer good thru Monday, May 4
Between the hours of 2 P.M. & 10 P.M.
COM E TO EIT HE R OF OUR 2 LOCATIONS
342 S. State 1327 S. University

}
E
t
t

Research
guidelines
(Continued iron page I)
would make "a judgment of the
appropriateness' of each c-n-
tract as it is reviewed in its owi
research environment . . .,
According to the plan, any con-
tract judged "inappropriate"' by
RPC according to the present
guidelines would be "noted" anti
"detailed reasons for such judg-
ment should be reported to Sen-
ate Assembly."
The report suggested that by
analyzing the reasons for a judg-
ment of "inappropriateness," ad-
ditional policies or mdification
of the present policy could be de-
veloped.
No mention was made, how-
ever, of what group would make
such an analysis.
The committee noted in con-
cluding, that the majority of
classified research project; at
the University involve remote
sensing devices that ar; used for
both military uses and "polu-
tion surveying".
It recommended that "a guide
to the appropriateness" of clas-
sified research at the University
"can be gained from a campus-
wide judgment of this type of
research.
Daily sqitopsI
(Continued from Page 3)
fice of Religious Affairs a n d
Planned Parenthood.
In response to that request,
The Daily referred to its policy
of accepting any advertising
which is not illegal. At that time,
the Daily business staff was un-
aware of the Michigan law pro-
hibiting abortion advertising.
In other local response to the
Michigan law, the student news-
paper at Eastern Michigan Uni-
versity (EMU);, the Eastern
Echo, was ordered by EMU Vice-
President for Finance Louis Pro-
fit to discontinue running an y
abortion referral advertisements.
Since last July 1, when a lib-
eralized abortion law went into
effect in New York, numerous
commercial abortion referral
agencies have been established.
These agencies generally serve
non-residents of New Y o r k,
directing out of state women to
hospitals and physicians for
abortions.
The commercial agencies have
been criticized because t h e y
charge a referral fee for their
services whereas there are sev-

(Continued from Page3)
Maintaining that CSJ had no-
jurisdiction to dissolve GA, As-
sembly Vice-President J oh in
Berg has said GA will continue
to function despite the ruling.
According to Berg, "essentially
we're going to act as if the rul-
ing doesn't exist."
According to GA president
Bommersbach, the case itself
was irrelevantdsince GA "does
not claim nor does its constitu-
tion state that it is a govern-
ment," therefore excluding it
from the outlines and categories
of the SGC legislation.
Further, Bommersbach asserts
that GA has attempted to oper-
ate more along the lines of a
federation than a government,
a "University-wide body repre-
senting the special interests of
the graduate-professional com-
munity."
According to its constitution,
the intended function of t h e
new Rackham government is to
be "the governmental, repre-
sentative, legislative and coor-
dinating organization for stu-
dents enrolled in Rackham . . .
(and to) undertake to guarantee
to Rackham students a good
and inexpensive education, a
meaningful and continuous role
Aerospace Engineering Pref.
aboruion ads
eral non-profit organizations,
which, however, do not adver-
tise, that also make abortion re-
ferrals, but at no cost.
Last week the New York State
Supreme Court ruled illegal the
operations of one commercial
referral agency, the Abortion In-
formation Agency.
Despite the new restrictions
upon abortion advertising, Stor-
ey commented: ". . . this does
not represent any change in our
advertising policy. It has been
consistently our policy that any-
one who wishes may advertise in
The Michigan Daily provided
they pay their bills and don't
violate the law."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity yie. nunscriptionirates: $10 lay
carrier, $10 by mai.
Summer session published Tuesday
thraosghsaturday morning Subscrip-
tion rages: $5 lay earriet, 5lyomait.

in Rackham policy-making," and
other advantages which, the
parties involved contend, GA
has not been able to obtain.
The Rackham Executive Board
has taken no action in t h e
matter, and Rackham associate
Dean George Hay says he knows
of "no intention on the part
of the Executive Board to be-
come further involved in the
matter in the immediate future."
Rail strike
(Continued from page 1)
Government officials said some
30,eOe big city commuters were
affected by the strilce and pre-
dicted snowballing effects on
mining, meatpacking, chemicals,
steel and other industries unless
the strike were quickly ended.
"It is incredible that the half
million employees of the rail in-
try should find themselves out
of work and that m lions of
Americans should be subjected
to serve disruption by this action
taken by a union representing a
relatively few employes," Secre-
tary of Labor James Hodgson
told a news conference.
Secretary of Transportation
John Volpe agreed that the ef-
fects of the strike had been felt
first on passenger traffic, with
most commuter operations shut
down.
But the more serious impact
soon will fall on freight opera-
tions, he said.
If the strike lasts two weeks,
the gross national product would
fall 5.8 per cent or more than
$1 billion, he said.
The rail industry itself would
lose $120 million in two weeks
and can ill afford this because of
its already shaky financial con-
dition, he said.
Daily Official Bulletin
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sty of Michigan. Notices should be
tet in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
411 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
TUESDAY, MAY 18
Day Calendar
Film Cooperative: "My Little Chica-
dee," Aud. A, Angell Hl;l. 7, 9:30 p.
Reliius Agis Seminar: "Toward
an Understanding of Homosexuality,"
Lutheran Student Chapel, 801 S. For-
est, 7:30 p.m.
PRONE Lecture: M. J. Robson, Mid-
west Regional Dir. of NOW, Ann Ar-
bor YM-YWCA, Club Rm. 1, 8 p.m.
Regents' Meeting: May 21.
General Notices
ATTENTION STUDENTS:
May 20, 1971 (:88 p.m.) is the last
date for the Spring Half Term when
the Registrar's Office will:
a. Accept the Student 100" per cent
Withdrawal Notice for refund purposes.
b. Allow refund for the student who
reduces hours of course credit below
full time.
May 20, 1971 (:88 p.m.) is the last
date for the Spring Half Term when
the Registrar's Office will allow refund
for a 50 per cent withdrawal.
May 20, 1971 (:88 p.m.) is the last
date for the Spring-Summer Term when
the Registrar's Office will:
a. Accept the Student 100 per cent
Withdrawal Notice for refund pur-
poses.
b. Allow refund for the student who
reduces hours of course credit below
funt time.
June 17, 1971 (4:00 p.m.) is the last
date for the Spring-Summer Te rm
when the Registrar's Office will allow
refund for a 50 per cent withdrawal.
Exception: Appropriate adjustments
will be made for ;hose schools having
elasses which commence other than
May 5, 1971.
- -.

MASTER'S DEGREE
PROGRAM
1 year Yellow Springs Center
Plan A Program.
Start in September; finish in
August. No thesis; no grades.
MAT in Social Studies or Ele-
mentory Education.
Deadline: July 1, 1971. Write
Antioch-Putney Graduate School,
Yellow Springs, Ohio 45387

Grad govt. dispute

1*

4

IF

- SANDALS
i - ;by
-« r
JPre
- Creo
... ":i~s:. :..--'. $16G00
Sto
-r
Sizes
to
10
OTHER
_: _ -: SANDALS
MFC'K IMQA11lAN_ fom $5.00
DOWNTOWN ast's CAMPUS
217 619,
S. Main TWO STORES E. Liberty

TOWARD AN UNDERSTANDING OF
HOMOSEXUALITY
An informal seminar
open to all interested persons
Tonight, 1:30 puma
Legal Considerations
Lutheran. Student Chapel
lower lounge)
801 S. Forest (at Hill)
Sponsored by: THE OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS
Michigan Union (3rd floor) 764-7442
FISH SANDWICH
30c
Some fish storyl
3362 Washtenaw St. (Just up from Arborland)

I

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