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May 18, 1972 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-05-18

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN, DAILY

Thursday, May 18, 1 972

ANTI-BUSING RIDER:
Now 231 sou s Open 12:45
I hIn.d c 1,a3,i5,n7,94dprm.
,)UWI. , Feature 2 har hn iue later I u a lon bi~ dr fe

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WASHINGTON (It) - Sen-
ate-House conferees reached
final agreement early yesterday
on a landmark $18.5 - billion
higher - education bill which
may be rejected because it is
entangled in the dispute over
school busing.
In breaking the deadlock on
the bill early yesterday morning,
the conferees watered down
three antibusing riders added to
the bill in the House, and the
compromise measure could be
in trouble in that Branch as a
result.
Nevertheless, the sponsors
predicted it would clear both
branches.
They emphasized that they
are counting on the great bene-
fits it will mean for all of the
nation's colleges and universi-
ties as well as the 8 million U.
S. college students to generate
enough support to win final
passage.
But they concede that they
will face opposition from die-
hard civil-rights advocates on
the left and from all-out oppo-
nents of any busing on the
right.
One of the busing riders
adopted would prevent any
court busing orders from tak-
ing effect before Dec. 31, 1973,
unless all appeals had been ex-
hausted.
The measure would establish
a new comprehensive plan to

aid college students which
would make every student eligi-
ble for a basic annual $1,400
stipend minus what his expect-
ed contribution from his fami-
ly would be.
(University . officials have ex-
pressed hopes that monies from
the bill will be a significant
factor in next year's budget.)
Other provisions would:
-authorize $2 billion to be
used to help schools with deseg-
regation problems;

Police could reduce
arrests, study says

-provide $390 million to im-
prove Indian education;
-extend current federal vo-
cational education programs at
a cost of $385 million;
-create a National Institute
of Education to conduct re-
search on how to spend school
funds more wisely; and
-establish a new program of
occupational education f o r
young persons who have com-
pleted high school.

{

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NIETZSCHE THE THINKER. by W
+ William M. Salter. One of the SI
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Nietzsche's work. With a new gl
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LETTERS OF THE BROWNINGS C
toGeorge Barrett. Elizabeth's T
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MODERN ART in the to
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short biographies a n c 3
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FLEMISH AND DUTCH t
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GERMAN AND SPANISH H
ART TO 1900 Io
FRENCH ART from 1350
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IRITISH AND NORTH B
AMERICAN ART
TELLIAMED or Conversations
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A. Carozzi. Pub. at 10.00.
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NAPOLEON AND THE BIRTH
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umes. by Gabriel Lovett. Anal-
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omplete Poetry of JOHN MIL- COLLECTED STORIES OF PET-
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OOK: its illustration and de- are reproduced in the original '
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FRENCH DRAWINGS: 15th thru Gericault
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FLEMISH AND DUTCH DRAWINGS: 15th to 18th Century
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AMERICAN DRAWINGS: Modern
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Each of these books contains over 100 illustrations,
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WASHINGTON IP) - An
American Bar Association ABA
committee recommends that po-
lice departments make fewer
arrests and hire legal advisers
to help share law-enforcement
policy.
The committee in a report re-
leased yesterday endorses col-
lective bargaining by police but
not the right to strike. Compul-
sory arbitration is suggested as
an alternative to striking.
"The assumption that the use
of an arrest and the criminal
process is the primary or even
the exclusive method available
to police should be recognized as
causing unnecessary distortion
of both the criminal law and the
system of criminal justice," says
the 12-member panel's report to
the ABA.
The panel's report calls for an
"in-house" legal adviser, pos-
sibly a young lawyer, who would
help develop the department's
position in such areas as hand-
ling drunks and drug addicts, in-
tervening in domestic quarrels
H UMAN RIGH TS
PARTY BENEFIT
-only advance ticket
sales help us- -
"ON E DAY
IN THE LIFE OF
IVAN DENISOVICH''
Thursday, May 18th
at the Fifth Forum
7 and 9 p.m. $2.00
advance tickets for
either show at:
Centicore on S. University
On the Diag
Discount Records
Interfaith Council-for Peace
McGovern for Pres. H.Q.
Chisholm for Pres. H.Q.
HRP Office, 304 S. Thayer
761-6650
NOTE: The pot-luck dinner-
discussion on "National Poli-
tics" will be Sat. at 6 p.m.--
HRP Office.

or landlord-tenant disputes, and
controlling demonstrations.
Some 75 police departments
currently have advisors, and the
ABA committee, headed by Prof.
Frank Remington of the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin, says the need
for expansion is urgent.
In proposing collective bar-
gaining, the committee says
policemen have a right to imple-
ment their interests in s u c h
aspects of their jobs as wages,
hours, pensions and fringe bene-
fits, but "due to the critical na-
ture of the police function with-
in government, there should be
no right to strike.''
The committee also recom-
mends against formation of'a na-
tional policeman's union, stat-
ing that law enforcement must
be locally controlled.
As for the role of police, the
committee says only a sma'l
percentage of an officer's work
involves situations in which an
arrest is sensible. Most of the
time he is dealing with a per-
son's troubles, such as drunken-
ness, or with nuisances, family
fights, rallies and parades.
Therefore, the committee re-
commends legislators should give
policemen limited but clear au-
thority to deal with the variety
of problems they confront -
without making the probiem, it-
self, a crime.
This would include power to
remove drunks from the stree,
to disperse crowds and to com-
bat self-destructive conduct by
the mentally ill and those in-
capacitated by alcohol or drugs,
all without making arrests.
COPIES
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3 to 100 of each original
101 to200-2c
* Top quality bond copies
* Two machines-no waiting
SPEED-A-PRINT
619 E. William at State

44

ONCE UPON
PRESENTED BY
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
May 17, 18, 19, 20;
and May 21 motinee and evening
Mendelssohn Theatre
A MUSICAL COMEDY BA>ED ON THE FAIRY ALE
"THE PRINCESS AND THE.PEA"
Directed and choreographed hy John Reid Klein
Tickets available at Mendelssohn Box Office

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