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May 17, 1972 - Image 12

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-05-17

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May 17, 1972

Page Twelve THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, May 17, 1972

Wallace takes state, Md.

(Continued from Page 1)
President Nixon swept to tow-
ering Republican primary vic-
tories in both states, over only
token opposition.
Theudoctors attending Wallace
were unable to say whether the
bullets that felled him at a
Laurel. Md., campaign rally
Monday would leave his legs
permanently paralyzed.
But Wallace aides said the gov-
ernor was determinedto continue
his White House quest Ironsa
wheelchair, if necessary.
The magnitude of Wallace vic-
tory margins indicated that po-
liticians who said the shooting
could draw sympathy votes and
turn out wavering supporteis
may have been right.
Losers Humphrey and Mc-
Govern refused to speculate
about that in their election night
statements.
Both senators said they vould
resume the campaigns they sus-
pended when Wallace was shot,
Humphrey today, with appear-
ances in New Jersey and Rhode
Island, McGovern tomorrow in
Oregon.
McGovern issued a statement
saying it would be "idle and
indeed inappropriate to speculate,
on what effect the tragic assi It
on Gov. Wallace may have had
on the voting.
"But it is clear that the con-
cerns to which Gov. Wallace ad-
dressed himself are real and
must be seriously considered,"'

the South Dakota senator said.
Humphrey, at his Washington
headquarters, congratulated Wal-
lace on the primary victors's,
but said the results were 'dwarf-
ed in importance" by the assas-
sination attempt.
But he also said. "We must
not permit an isolated act of
violence by one to distort the
true picture of the American
democratic process.
He said he doubted the Wallace
shooting would lead him or other
candidates to be less open n.
their campaign styles.
". . . These elections were
held in unbelievable and tragic
circumstances," he said.
The Minnesota senator insisted
his prospects for the nomination
would not be damaged by the
Maryland and Michigan out-
comes.
Hearing on war
An open hearing on the war in
Indochina will be held today at
7:30 p.m. The meeting Will be
chaired by Mayor Robert Harris
and attended by City Council
members.S
The hearing will have no time
limit and will continue as long as
there are speakers who wish to
talk.
Speakers are expected to at-
tend from People Against the
Air War, Vietnam Veterans
Against the War, Interfaith
Council for Peace, and other
groups.

"Alexander Solzhe-
Ilitsyn, tie Nobel Prize
Winnter, is lionored
again lby an exquisite
movie version of his
masterpiece. Ranks
with Ihe screen's most
nemoralble tributes 1o
the iiidolnitalble (ig iily
of' man. A virtually
perfect fit i."
-Bruce Williamson, Playboy
"The mOVie has power.
With meticulous effort it is
memorably successful.
Tom Courtenay's work
makes him an actor of
exceptional distinction. He
1s hautingly effective
as Ivan."
--William Wolf, Cue Magazine

"A brilliant version of the
novel by Nobel Prize
Winner, Alexander
Solzhenitsyn. The author
would relish so faithful an
interpretation of his work.
This is a beautifully
made film that anyone
interested in humanity
should see."
Judith Crist, New York Magazine
"'One Day' is a
lwatiiul, careful
epiction. Ivan,
wond(erflly played by
Torn (ouirteuiay, stands
for himself, for
Solzhenitsyn, and
perhaps for
Hlltitll(1es.5
-Penelope Gilliat, The New Yorker

bridge
Rubber bridge played every afternoon
and evening in pleasant atmosphere
INTERNATIONAL BRIDGE CLUB
PARK SHERATON HOTEL
Kirby & Woadward
1 p.m. every day
IN THE CULTURAL CENTER)
Tel TR 4-4333

ALEXANDER SOLZHENITSYNS
IN M ELIFE
O fEOF IMA DENY0I1ICH
Wednesday, Thursda- T O Friday, Saturday-
7:00,.9:00F A N7,79,191

I

------ -------- ---

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join us
in

THE WHOLE WORLD is watching the American people's
response to Nixon's latest and most dangerous escala-
tions. Answer him in a massive demonstration in the
streets of the Nation's Capital.
SUNDAY, MAY 21, 11:00 A.M.: Gather at the Ellipse
for a peaceful march past the White House to the
Capitol steps. Sponsored jointly by NPAC and PCPJ.
MONDAY, MAY 22: People's Lobby at Congress and
the People's Blockade of the Pentagon. Sponsored by
the PCPJ.
For more information, Call 76-GUIDE
(9 AM to 9 P.M.
76-GUIDE will also arrange transportation. Those
needing rides and those with space, CALL 76-GUIDE.

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