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May 17, 1972 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-05-17

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Pagq Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May 17, '1972

Pagg Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, May 17, 1 97~

SPRING TERM SPECIAL
TODAY Billiards $1/hour
Last Day Bowling 35c/game
Let's go! Ping Pong 50c hour
MICHIGAN UNION
FREE POCKET BILLIARD INSTRUCTION
THURSDAY 7-9 P.M.
a) r 1 3 ir

Group discusses problems
for Chicano admissions

MAY 19, 20
DavdCopprfield
W.C. FIELDS, FREDDIE
BARTHOLEMEW in this
grand adaptation of
Dickens' novel
MAY 26, 27
On the Waterfront
MARLON BRANDO, ROD
STEIGER, LEE J. COBB.
Dockland violence nd union
corruption provide the
backdrop for Elio Kazan's
drama.
JUNE 2, 3
Mr. Hulot's Holiday
Director Jacques Tati's
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
JUNE 9, 10
Night of the Hunter
Scripted by James Agree,
directed by Charles
Laughton, with SHELLY
WINTERS, ROBERT
MITCHUM and LILLIAN
GISH.

JUNE 16, 17
Woen's F IlmBenfit
Benefit for Ann Arbor
Feminist House--titles
to be announced
JUNE 23, 24
MALTESE FALCOIN
Classic! HUMPHREY
BOGART, PETTER LORRE,
SINDEY GREENSTREET
JUNE 30, JULY 1
CAMILLE
GRETA GARBO, ROBERT
TAYLOR. Dir. by George
Cukor. Bring Kleenex for
this romantic tearjerker.

By PAUL RUSKIN
Launching a scathing attack
on the White, Anglo dominated
education system's failure to
e d u c a t e Chicano children,
speakers at the annual conven-
tion of the Association of Chi-
canos for College Admissions,
Inc. (ACCA), - discussed ways
to help Chicanos get college
educations.
ACCA President Carlos Fal-
con opened the conference, held
last Saturday at Michigan State
University.
Falcon charged that "our
schools are not preparing quali-
fied Chicanos for college." Fal-
-CLIP AND SAVE"--"
r r
r ,
* Phone Numbers
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Circulation
r ,
764-0558
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C lassifey Adv.
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* I
* .I
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764-055
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S WI
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764-0552
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-CI ADSAE

can says Chicanos, who he de-
fines as all Spanish speaking
Americans, face discrimination
in school because their lack of
proficiency in English prevents
them from scoring well on
standardized tests.
Furthermore, Falcon said,
"guidance counselors are the
biggest racists of them all,"
adding that Chicanos are often
channeled into vocational cur-
riculums without ever receiving
a fair chance to display their
ability in "academic" subjects.
Falcon discussed the efforts
which ACCA has made to im-
prove the quality of Chicano
education.
One goal of ACCA is to force
the state government to provide
bi-lingual and bi-cultural pro-
grams in all school districts
which have significant Chicano
populations. Such programs en-
tail both Spanish and English
instruction and the teaching of
Mexican-American history and
culture.
Claiming that ''what's good
for Johnny isn't good for Juan-
ito and what's good for Juanito
is better for Johnny," Falcon
believes that bi-cultural pro-
grams benefit Anglos, as well as
Chicanos, by exposing white
children to a second culture.
A major accomplishment of
the ACCA has been the appoint-
ment of Chicano admissions of-
ficers by several state univer-
sities, including this Univer-
sity. These officers visit Michi-
gan high schools to recruit
qualified Chicano students. Chi-
cano undergraduate enrollment
here rose from five to 42 after
a Chicano admissions officer
was hired. Admissions officer
Ramiro Gonzalez expects Chi-
cano enrololment to reach 90 by
fall.
Besides recruiting new stu-
dents, Chicano admissions of-
ficers have also been instru-
mental in establishing suppor-
tive services for Chicanos who
do decide to enroll. Here, for
example, Chicanos have formed
PAPERBACK
BOOKS on
FOL LETT'S
Mezzanine
Now Arranged
By Subject

three different organizations.
Gonzalez is negotiating with the
administration for a Chicano
cultural center, which he hopes
will alleviate some of the in-
tense social pressures many Chi-
canos feel.
Dr. Uvaldo Palomares, Presi-
dent of the Institute for Per-
sonal Effectiveness in Children,
in San Diego, California, was
the keynote speaker at the con-
ference.
Palomares began by saying
that whit-run colleges often
have a negative influence on
people, admitting that "Volo
as Palomares calls himself)
was a better person when he
was 15 loading boxcars than
when he was 27 getting his
PhD." However, he acknowledg-
ed that it is important for the
survival of Chicano culture that
its youth obtain qualify educa-
tion. He therefore spoke on how
to encourage Chicanos to go to
school and stay there.
According to Palomares, fear
and. money are the two major
problems preventing Chicanos
from going to college. He says
that' since most Chicanos have
experienced nothing but failure
during their school careers, the
first step in convincing a Chi-
cano that he should continue
school is to prove that he or she
"is not dumb" and does have
the ability to succeed in college.
At the same time, Palomares
warns that prospective students
must be informed about the
problems which they will face if
they do decide to go to college.
He cited some of these, includ-
ing social pressures and com-
petition with students who have
better academic backgrounds.
Once the admission problem
is solved,.a financial barrier re-
mains. Palomares advises re-
cruiters to realize that the Chi-
cano culture recognizes the ex-
tended family concept. Thus, a
student who receives a scholar-
ship may still be unable to en-
roll in college because the stu-
dent's family depends on the
money he or she could earn if
not in school.
Palomares also discussed re-
lations between Chicanos and
blacks. He thinks that Chicano
and Black organizations should
work together to solve specific
mutual problems. At the same
time, Palomares warned, Chi-
canos could lose their autonomy
and effectiveness if they decide
to merge officially with black
organizations.
The Haida Indians were the
Vikings of North America's
west coast, trading and raid-
ing in 50-foot canoes.

Shows at 7 & 9:05 p.m. admission only 75c
AT
A&D AUDITORIUM
(on Monroe between Haven and lappan)

© 1972 Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co., Milwaukee and other great cities.
TAURUS,
APRIL 20-MAY 20
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tnow the Bull's chatacteristics. And you hnow the Bull is
thete whenevet you watt bold, dependable good taste.
Even if you're of a quieter sign, you'll be drawn by the
relentless energies of Taurus the Bull. Just be prepared. AITLQO
Because there's no denying the dominating boldness of
Schlitz Malt Liquor.
Nobody makes malt liquor like Schlitz. Nobody.

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