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August 18, 1972 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-08-18

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, August 18, 1972

PaeEgtTEMCIA1AL rdy uut1,17

GOP to act on controversial
delegate plan at convention

For S PLEXIGLASS
" FIBEROPTIC KITS
" PLASTIC FOAM BEANS
FOR BEAN BAG CHAIRS
SEE
Ann Arbor Plastics, Inc.
2275 S. STATE RD. 665-9555

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. P) Af-
ter another lively fight yester-
day, the Republican National
Committee opened the way to a
convention floor battle next week
by adopting a delegate reap-
portionment plan that favors
traditionally conservative states
in the selection of the 1976 GOP
presidential nominee.
Opponents of the reapportion-
ment plan represent mostly
large, urban states. They indi-
cated they would take their bat-
tle to the floor where their dele-
gate strength will give them a
better chance than in the Na-
tional . Committee where each
state has three votes regardless
of size.
The adopted plan, which re-
places one declared unconstitu-
tional by a federal judge in

Washington, will affect the 1976
convention and will award bon-
us delegates to states w h i c h
vote for President Nixon in this
year's election.
Sponsored by big-name party
conservatives, it is expected to
give extra punch to Southern,
Midwestern, rural and small stat-
es which traditionally go Repub-
lican in presidential elections.
They were joined in the fight
by such states as California,
which lose relative strength un-
der the plan, but preferred it
because of the overall advantage
to conservatives.
While it appeared as a tug be-
tween big states and little stat-
es, it more truly was the liberal
elements in the party against the
conservatives. If the new form-
ula stands, conservatives w i1ll

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have a major advantage in nam-
ing a 1976 candidate such as
Vice President Spiro Agnew, for
instance.
"It's all these states that want
to go for Agnew that are against
us," said Frederick Lippit of
Rhode Island, a leader of the
opposition forces. "If they c a n
carry their states for Nixon,
they will get all these bonuses
and come to the 1976 convention
in much stronger position."
The Platform Committee also
heard one more appeal for a
stand against existing abortion
laws.
Some women delegates were
unhappy with the draft plank on
women's rights - although the
touchy issue of abortion laws ap-
parently had been sidetracked at
least for the present.
The subcommittee that took
testimony on the issues relating
to women was reported to have
agreed to seek stronger provis-
ions on elimination of discrimina-
tion in economic matters, such as
obtaining credit, and a more af-
firmative commitment to provis-
ion of day care for the children
of working mothers.
Repeal of abortion laws, how-
ever, was not approved nor even
discussed very much, said one
committee member.
The abortion issue could still
be brought up in the full Repub-
lican Plaaform Committee a n d
even on the floor of the conven-
tion itself. Rules allow any dele-
gate to offer an amendment -
if he can gain recognition.
New
Freshmen!
Do you want money, a draft
deferment, leadership and
management training,
self-confidence?
If your answer is yes, then
inest ,/ hour of your time
to find out how you obtain
the above by attending the
Army ROTC orientation at
Room 200 in North Hall at
3:301 p.m. every day.
DIAL 5-6290
2 CLASSICS RETURN
EAHEIMBER ONEN OVE F THt
YEAR..saOWsAMTIN PITREt
. ROSS HUNTER >omunos
AIRPORT
BURT DEAN
LANCASTER - MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG
JACQUELINE BISSET
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE
AND

RICHARD BURTON
GENEVIEVE BUJOLD
IHIIALWALLIS iuOcUtoas
e l~ed-
tt IeA~usaz s Z
A iNM s Po ]<

BUT THE LAW THAT PROVIDES FOR
REWARD HAS GONE ALMOST UNNOTICED
THE WATEI ACT of 1899
made it unlawful "to throw, discharge, or deposit any refuse
matter of any kind or description whatever into any navigable
water of the United States." The only exception is when a
permit to pollute is obtained from the Army Corps of Engi-
neers.

00$00"r25 a
A DAY
The law makes every individual and corporate polluter
subject to a fine of 500 to 2,500 dollars for each day of the
violation.
And whoever catches the polluter can get half the fine as
a reward.
There are over 40,000 industrial polluting plants in this
country operating outside the law.
If you want to know how to catch them write for The
Bounty Hunters' Guide on Water Pollution, The Project on
Clean Water, Natural Resources Defense Council, 36 West 44th
Street, New York, N.Y. 10036.
The best way to fight water pollution is to make your
own waves.
Prepared by the Stern Concern. Space contributed by The Michigan Daily

400

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