100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 17, 1972 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-08-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, August 17, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday, August 17, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pane Nine

WILDCAT THREATENED:
Union bosses end British dock
strike; rank and file protest

LONDON (M - Britain's crip-
pling 20 day national dock strike
was called off yesterday but a
balk by militants put a quick re-
turn to work in doubt.
Angry stevedores physically at-
tacked Transport Workers Un-
ion chief Jack Jones, one of the
main architects of the settle-
ment package, after he said the
nation's ports would be open nor-
mally as of midnight Sunday.
The back-to-work decision came
in a 53-50 vote at a dock work-
ers' delegate conference in Lon-
don. The stoppage has stalled ex-
ports worth millions of dollars
and sliced vital food imoprts.
The dock delegates accepted
virtually the same settlement
terms - offering better job se-
curity and higher severance pay
-that they rejected in calling
the stoppage.
Improvements in the final deal
were marginal but included a
guaranteed extra 200 jobs in con-
tainer firms where longshoremen
are demanding the right to work
and special levies are likely to
be made by the ports on other
companies not using registered
dock labor. This will make it less
attractive for these companies

to employ truck drivers to load
and unload containers. The truck-
ers earn less than longshoremen.
Though most smaller ports are
expected to resume normal work-
ing Monday, the anger generated
by the settlement in the coun-
try's main docks in London, Liv-
erpool and Hull could spark an
.unofficial continuation of the
stoppage by militants.
Violence flared outside t h e
Transport Union's headquarters
when the i'esult was announc-
ed. One docker charged into the
conference room and hurled a
metal ashtray at Jones' head. He
missed.
Then the militants turned on
the police security cogdon around

the building, and fights broke
out.
Some pickets tried to chase the
dispersing delegates. Mounted
police were called in to separate
the combatants.
Furious longshoremen broke up
a news conference Jones and oth-
er union leaders tried to hold.
One man threw a glass of water
into the union chief's face. Oth-
ers shouted they had been be-
trayed in their fight for stronger
job security and more severance
pay.
One longshoreman shouted to
Jones: "You are a leper! Where
is your yellow arm band?"
Jones, shaken, cried to the mob:
"I have done my best for you."

AT 3 P.M. ON 17 AUGUST .. .
(if we last that long) Health Service INPUT will automatically
self-destruct. Rob and Shari are heading north to solve a prob-
lem of our own ie. degeneration. We reactivate at noon on
5 Sept. to handle your questions and complaints about Health
Service. Until then, call 764-7428 if you need information.
Please hold off on more complex problems until we return, or
CALL 763-4384 TODAY UNTIL 3 P.M.
Health
Service 0,0 a 1
SandN
WEEKDAYS ad
NOON TO
THREE
763-4384

I
{
I

Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad
The Place to Meet
INTERESTING People
BACH CLUB
presents
Damaris Tyler, French horn
John Jacobsen, French horn
Linda Corbett, French horn
Leonard Stein, Piano
PLAYING WORKS OF:
Bach, Bach-Gounod, Boismortier
11691-1755),
Weber and Arnold
BAKLAVA SERVED
AFTERWARDS
Thurs., Aug. 17, 8 P.M.
So. Quad, West Lounge
No musical knowledge needed
Absolutely EVERYONE welcome!
for ifo
769-1605, 663-4875
DIAL 5-6290
2 CLASSICS RETURN
THENUMBER ONEN OVELt O THE
wstR..OaW a A TtaNPICTURE'
SROSS HUNTER P-oDucT oN
AIRPORT I
BURT 5., DEAN I
LANCASTER.- MARTIN I
JEAN SEBERG
JACQUELINE BISSET
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE
AND
RICHARD BURTON
GENEVIEVE BUJOLD I
iti HAL WALLIS v:n:O ;CoIo
V~ef4ousa1-DL

EIERY WATEII POLLUTEI
IN THIS COUNTRY HAS
A PitICE ON HIS IEAD!!
BUT THE LAW THAT PROVIDES FOR
REWARD HAS GONE ALMOST UNNOTICED
TEI WATER ACT of 1I899
made it unlawful "to throw, discharge, or deposit any refuse
matter of any kind or description whatever into any navigable
water of the United States." The only exception is when a
permit to pollute is obtained from the Army Corps of Engi-
neers
TO
A DAY 24
The law makes every individual and corporate polluter
subject to a fine of 500 to 2,500 dollars for each day of the
violation.
And whoever catches the polluter can get half the fine as
a reward.
There are over 40,000 industrial polluting plants in this
country operating outside the law.
If you want to know how to catch them write for The
Bounty Hunters' Guide on Water Pollution, The Project on
Clean Water, Natural Resources Defense Council, 36 West 44th
Street, New York, N.Y. 10036.
The best way to fight water pollution is to make your
own waves.
Prepared by the Stern Concern. Space contributed by The Michigan Daily

low

I

I

b00

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan