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August 16, 1972 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-08-16

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Wednesday, August 16, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

GOP aims APPEAL PLANNED
for more Judge lifts oil pipeline injunction

Swomen
MIAMI BEACH (P) - Repub-
lican rule makers yesterday ten-
tatively sought equal representa-
tion for women at future GOP
national conventions, but shut
out- any such actions for young
people and minorities;
At the same time, another pre-
convention subcommittee of the
GOP Rules Committee was em-
broiled in controversy over the
11th - hour proposal by Sen.
John Tower of Texas for reap-
portioning 1976 GOP convention
delegates.
Tower's plan would allow
smaller states to keep a cer-
tain delegate level while award-
ing larger states bonus conven-
tion votes at a faster rate.
The change in representation
for women was approved by the
Rules Committee's subcommit-
tee on election of delegates. It
would require each state to "en-
deavor to have equal represen-
tation of men and women in its
delegation" at. future conven-
tions.
Sponsors said +this' would not
require specific quotas for wo-
men, only a good faith effort
on the part of state parties to
balance their delegations. State
parties in which women chose
not to participate would not be
penalized. But the rule change
would make it difficult for state
parties to -shut out women who
want in.
The subcommittee amended
another rule to ban discrimina-
tion on the basis of sex and age.
It already is banned on the basis
of race,. religion, color or na-
tional origin.
But another section of the
same rule which did require
state parties to assure partici-
pation of minority groups was
watered down to require only
that they have the opportunity to
take part in party affairs.
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
announce auditions for
FORTY CARATS
to be directed by Ted Heusel
4 men and 7 women will be cast
Aug. 14, 15, & 17
7:30 p.m.
201 W. Mulhollnd
(off W. Washington)

WASHINGTON (P) - A federal
judge yesterday dissolved the in-
junction which has blocked con-
struction of an oil pipeline across
Alaska for more than two years.
But environment groups whose
opposition to the project had won
the original stay saidthey would
appeal immediately to a higher
court.
District Judge George Hart Jr.,
who issued the injunction in April
1970 dissolved it yesterday after
rejecting every legal argument
by the environment groups w h o
had sought to have it continued.
Hart made it clear he was
framing his decision to expedite
the anticipated appeal and that
he believes the pipeline question
eventually will have to be set-

tied in the U.S. Supreme Court.
The proposed trans-Alaska
pipeline was one of the earliest
tests of the National Environ-
mental Policy Act passed in 1969
and signed into law on Jan. 1,
1970.
Then-Secretary of the Interior
Walter Hickel, was on the verge
of issuing permits for construc-
tion of the pipeline from Arctic
oil fields to a port in Southern
Alaska when three environment
groups sued the department to
block the permits, alleging that
the Interior had not complied
with the new law's requirement
of a detailed study of environ-
mental impacts.
These groups have argued also

that the pipeline, its construction
road, and related facilities would
occupy far more land than the
secretary was entitled to author-
ize under the 1920 Mineral Leas-
ing Act.
For the past 28 months Hart's
injunction has held up action
on the pipeline while the Inter-
ior Department prepared and is-
sued a first draft environmental
impact statement, then held pub-
lic hearings, and then, last
March, issued a final impact
statement.
After providing 45 days for ad-
ditional public comment, Inter-
ior Secretary Rogers Morton an-
nounced last May that he has
decided to issue the permits and

allow construction of the pipeline
once the legal hurdles are clear-
ed.
Yesterday the environmental
groups and their opponents res
turned to Hart's courtroom but
this time Hart ruled against them
on every point.
Dennis Flannery - represent-
ing the Wilderness Society, En-
vironmental Defense Fund, and
Friends of the Earth - at first
requested a stay of his decision.
But Justice Department lawyer
Herbert Pittle, representing the
Interior Department, said the de-
partment has not yet drafted the
pipeline permits and could not,
therefore, issue them immediate-
ly.

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