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August 09, 1972 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-08-09

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Wednesday, August 9, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Primary election results
These results are from Washtenaw County only, with 52 precincts-or about one-third-of the
precincts-reporting.

Kids deadly in N. Ireland

Republican Races
UNITED STATES SENATOR
Griffin-4,343
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS
2nd District
Esch-4,240
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
52nd District
Smith-864
53rd District
Renner-1,387
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
Delhey-4,122
COUNTY SHERIFF
Owings-2,359
Koch-576
Stander-370
Adams-238
COUNTY CLERK
Harrison-2,944
Singer-785
COUNTY TREASURER
Leonard-3,288
REGISTER OF DEEDS
Hardy-3,696
DRAIN COMMISSIONER
Wanty-1,169
Knowles--919
Wharry-671
Sheldon-439
Mason-285
Haight-276

COUNTY4COMMISSIONERS
Disteict 14
Wickliffe-141
District 15
Young-55
DjemocraIt'c Races
UNITED STATES SENATOR
Kelley-4,514
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS
2nd District (Washtenaw
County only)
Shapiro-2,379
Stempien-868
Turner-666
nrown-595
Schwab-685
Kehoe-476
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
52nd District
Dwyer-761
53rd District
Bullard-862
Eckstein-854
Forsyth-763
Carlson-363
Soloman-341
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
Sallade-3,956
COUNTY SHERIFF
Postill-3,164
Moon-1,481

Iorn-656
COUNTY CLERK
Armstrong-3,926
COUNTY TREASURER
Goddard-3,902
REGISTER OF DEEDS
Kosher-3,720
DRAIN COMMISSIONER
Fulton-3,907
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
District 14
Fojtik-259
McFadden-218
District 15
Taylor-280
Rollinger-98
Non-Partisan Races
WASHTENAW CIRCUIT COURT
Conlin-5,072
Derake-4,034
Elden-3,355
Burgoyne-2,948
Lax-2,617
Propositions
PROPOSITION A (juries)
Yes-7,359
No-2,589
PROPOSITION B (parks)
Yes-4,577
No-5,018

Shapiro, Stempien in

(Continued from Page 1)
The final results hinge on the
margin Shapiro. beats Stempien
on the local absentee ballots left
to be counted. Those results will
not be known until morning.
Postill, after a hard-fought and
occasionally v i c i o u s primary
race, ran away from second
place Harold Moon by a vote of
7,388 to 3,466. Ypsilanti Town-
ship Constable Richard Horn fin-
ished a poor third.
Despite heavy opposition by
Moon and from local media, Pos-
till scored major gains in vir-
tually every precinct in the
County.
Postill beat Moon badly in the
predominantly stiident areas of
Ann Arbor. In fact, according to
unofficial returns, Postill won
every precinct in the city except
one-Ward One, precinct one-
where Moon beat Postill by 13
votes.
County-wide Postill won all of
the 150 precincts except perhaps
20.
The key to Postill's success
was to declare himself a candi-
date early and to work hard at
getting students to sign for ab-
sentee ballots. His attacks on
Sheriff Doug Harvey, whom he
will battle in November, also
brought his name to prominence
in the county.
In November, Postill will face
H a r v e y, Undersheriff Harold
Ownings, who won the Republi-
Kelle
Griffin'
on ballot
DETROIT l) - Legal require-
ments satisfied, U.S. Sen. Robert
Griffin and Atty. Gen. Frank
Kelley can launch full-scale cam-
paign bids today for Griffin's
job as Michigan's junior senator.
Both men readily fulfilled the
legal need to obtain at least one
vote in yesterday's party pri-
maries. Neither had opposition in
seeking his party's nomination.
With 43 per cent of the state's
votes counted, Griffin had polled
226,964 votes. Meanwhile, Kelley
had 162,413.
N e it h e r candidate bothered
staying in Michigan yesterday.
"Gee, I don't know where he
(Griffin) is," said state GOP
Chairman William McLaughlin
late yesterday. "I assume he's
in Washington. I suppose he'll be
back Friday." The U.S, Senate
was in session last night.
Kelley was in New York on
business yesterday, his daughter
said. He was due home today.
Kelley and Griffin have spent
the past ew weeks taking poli-
tical potshots at each other-al-
most all of them on the busing
issue.

can Sheriff's primary, and pos-
sibly a Human Rights Party can-
didate.
With the majority of the ab-
sentee ballots from Ann Arbor
not yet counted, Bullard seems
to have closely won the Demo-
cratic 53rd District State Repre-
sentative nomination from four
other liberal candidates. Bullard
is expected to add to his winning
total when the returns are in
from the absentee ballots.
Bullard, at last count, was
ahead with 2,426 votes. Closely
trailing were Helen Forsyth, a
law student, with 1,872 and Peter
Eckstein, an economist, with
1,909 votes.
Those absentee ballots al-
ready counted show Bullard
received the majority of those
votes.
Bullard, a local attorney, has
also managed to get notable
newspaper publicity by defend-
ing numerous local radical
causes.
As the campaign heated up
in recent weeks, Bullard came
under attack from various lo-
cal groups for claiming affilia-

tight race
Lion with them. Those groups,
notably the Ann Arbor Ten-
ants Union and the local chap-
ter of the Vietnam Veterans
Against the War, (VVAW) cri-
ticized Bullard for using their
names to support his "substan-
tial record of activism".
Bullard ' s major competi-
tion in November will come
from the Human Rights Party.
The Republicans are given lit-
tle chance to win the predomi-
nately left-liberal student dis-
trict.
WET SKIES
The amount of water in the
atmosphere above a square mile
of land on a mild summer day
is estimated to be 50,000 tons.
ANCIENT TALK
Some of the world's present-
day languages existed as early
as 1850 B.C., the National Geo-
graphic Society says.
CLOTH
Indians of Peru produced
elaborate textiles as early as
4000 B.C

(Continued from Page 3)
For many British soldiers the
kids are more effective tha- the
gunmen.
Urchins in the grim Belfast
slums have known little else but
the hatred and suspicion that
has simmered between the two
religious communities for years.
Kids on both sides roam the
streets in wild gangs defying
everyone-parents, police and
priests.
Several children have died in
Ulster's three years of agony.
Many have been injured. A 14-
year-old Catholic boy was blind-
ed as he played soccer. He was
Daily Official Bulletin
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9
A-V Center Films: "tained Glass:
A Photographic Essay," and others, Aud.
4, Modern Lang. Bldg., 7 p.m.
Co-Recreational Family Night: For
faculty and staff, IM Bldg., 7-10 p.m.
Music School: Richard Mcpherson,
Organ recital, Hill Ad., 8 p.m
Music School: Jonathan Friedman,
Bassoon recital, Sch, of Mus. Recital
Hall, 8 p.m.
University Players: Gelbart, Shevelove
& Sondheim's "A Funny Thing Hap-
pened on the Way to the Forum," Pow-
er Center, 8 p.m.
GENERAL NOTICES
Career Planning & Placement Inter-
views: IBM Corp. representatives will
bc on campus Tusday Aug. 1, 172,
tn in=erview applicants wih na,.or
M.S in the following: Math, C o m p .
Sci., Physics, Programming, Systems
Programming, or Systems Analysis. This
will e work on the development of
a National Air Space System (Air Traf-
fic Control). We will also interview for
Sales Repres ntatives in va rus geo-
gpicoleatons - anymajor
1 214 S. University
Dioal 668-6416
TUE AT
CAMPUS 7WED.m
FROM 1:30
HE'S SEEN IT ALL
AND DONE IT ALL!
He's X rated
and animated!
J cton in t dernA RNAoR
613 E. LIBERTY
DIAL 665-620
OPEN 1 P.M
SHOWS AT 1:15-3:10-5 P.M.
TECUHNICOLOR - FrmWar/-- RrYs_
A Vwamer Conrmmnca ons Company 1
COMING SOON
ACK LEMMON'BARARA HAWR$
k JASON ROBARDS 'PG -r
Conr State & Liberty Sts

DIAL 662-6264
SHOWS
AT
THE- A

hit by a rubber bullet fired by
troopers at rioters nearby.
Parents are frightened. The
case of Bernadette, 11, is typi-
cal. She is a chirpy blonde mop-
pet who lives in the riotous
Andersonstown district of Bel-
fast. She loves the riots that
swirl outside her door.
"I cannot control her at all,"
says her mother, haggard and
jumpy from the violence and
the constant fear her seven
children will get hurt.
"Bernadette hears the soldiers
coming, and she's off to shout
at them or pick up stones for
her brothers to throw. She'll
get killed one day."
But for every one of the baby-
faced rioters, there is a child
who is frightened by the orgy of
bombing, shooting and rioting.
These are nervous wrecks,
afraid even to go into the streets
to play. Doctors report many
burst into tears when they hear
thunder. They think it is a
bomb.

WED.-SAT AT 9:00 y
CCAJf OF RYMY
SUN. AT 8:30
MON.-TUES. AT 9:00
MORE DANCING WITH
21Stone SchoolRA
G217 SAISH LE 2 PM.-2AM

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