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August 09, 1972 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-08-09

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Wednesday, August 9, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wednesday, August 9, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

FOOD SHORTAGE:
Poliee, longshoremen fight as
Art Priuts Britain suffers from strike
LONDON (A) - Striking hundred reinforcements in to weekend unless the strikef
are due Wed., Aug. 16th* longshoremen battled police the area and said two other ed.
yesterday as tempers flared in trucks inside the dock would A big poultry combine
the national dock stoppage that not be allowed to leave until it would gas and bury two
Please bring them to the has shut down Britain's ports the pickets broke up. lion five-week old broiler ci
for 12 days. The National Union of Far- ens next Monday unless
The clash came at docks on mers warned the government workers began unloading
AC offices, 2nd floor Union the River Trent in Lincoln- that stocks of high-protein ani- plies in the strikebound s
shire as union leaders warned mal feed - essential for pigs The birds are worth about$
*but we'd like them b Aug. 10thI the strike was almost certain to and poultry - were down to million.
drag on into a third week. Far- four days supply in some parts The government was repo
__-_____________________" - mers prepared to slaughter pigs of Britain. reluctant to use troops to
_ _ _ , ___,-- I ~I A rspe~rsues v sna fso saruiers ~rrlin r.nn.

end-
said
mil-
hick-
dock
sup-
hips.
$2.45
orted
un-

dur Food s
Steak -Chicken
Beef* Fish* Sandwiches
3035 Washtenaw across from Lee Oldsmobile

and poultry starved of imported
high-protein food.
The government, which is
expected to resist farmers' pleas
for troops to break the docks
blockade, was still pinning its
hopes on a quick settlement
emerging from a peace commit-
tee of port employers and
union chiefs.
Britain's 42,000 longshore-
men walked out of the docks in
support of demands for more
pay and job security.
The fighting came at a small
Trent port near Scunthrope
where dock workers are still on
the fob.
P i c k e t s of longshoremen
surged round two trucks leav-
ing with loads of animal feed
and timber.
The scuffles left six police-
men injured. One said he, had
been grabbed by two dockers
while a third kicked him in the
face.
At least four dockers were ar-
rested. Seventeen dockers had
been arrested outside.,the same
wharf in incidents Monday.
Police later drafted several

A spokesperson said farmers
would be forced to start slaugh-
tering animals and birds this
House to act

anti-busing proposals

WASHINGTON (P) - A bill that
would impose strict limits on the
federal courts' power to order
busing in school desegregation
cases was approved 21-16 yester-
day by the House Education and
Labor Committee.
The bill would prohibit cross-
town busing of elementary-
school pupils and permit it at
higher grades only under strict
limitations. Courts would have to
try all other desegregation meth-
ods before turning to busing.
The committee added a pro-
vision designed to concentrate
more federal education funds in
inner-city schools to improve
their educational quality.
It authorized $500 million a year
for that purpose, with the mon-

SHOP THURSDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
CLOSED SATURDAYS THROUGH AUGUST 12

load the supplies in case the
action angered the longshore-
men and delayed a settlement.
onthree

Miss J leads
the soft life in
Jonathan Logan knits. . .
a soft to see, soft to touch
pant-set and dress of
sweater-knit lambswool/angora,
gently ribbed at the top.
Sizes 5 to 13.
A. Pant set in beige/browr
or grey/slate. $40.
B. Dress in pink or blue
with brown stripings. $26.
JA

ey to come out of the $1 bil-
lion authorized earlier for emer-
gency aid to schools that are
desegregating.
Approval of the bill after a
long struggle in the committee
cleared the way for a flurry of
voting on antibusing measures
in the two weeks remaining be-
fore Congress recesses for the
Republican National Convention.
The Rules Committee, which
controls the flow of legislation to
the House floor, already has ap-
proved a constitutional amend-
ment that would outlaw busing.
It will vote tomorrow to clear
still another anti-busing bill for
a House vote.
That bill, requested by Presi-
dent Nixon last March, would pre-
vent the federal courts from is-
suing any new busing orders un-
til next June 30.
It is designed to freeze the
busing situation where it is now
in order to give Congress time
to pass permanent desegregation
guidelines for the courts to fol-
low.
The bill from the Education
and Labor Committee would es-
tablish those guidelines, but anti-
busing forces still want t h e
freeze on new busing orders en-
acted in case the guidelines bill
should die in the Senate.
In addition, 167 members have
signed a petition demanding a
vote on the constitutional amend-
ment, which makes it likely that
all three will be acted on within
the next two weeks.
As it came from the Educa-
tion and Labor Committee, the
guidelines bill is milder than
many antibusing members desire,
and a strong effort to toughen it
undoubtedly will be made.
One provision Southerners are
certain to try to revive would
permit school districts already
under court orders to go back
into court and seek a modifica-
tion of those orders to conform to
the new antibusing guidelines.
MCAT-DAT-GRE
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" Six and twelve sess;on groups
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to meet individual needs
Summer Sessions
Special Compact Courses
Weekends-Intersessions
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EDUCATIONAL CENTER
DETROIT BRANCH
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Southfield, Michigan 48075
(313) 354-0085
Success Through Education
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Nationwide Reputation

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