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August 08, 1972 - Image 12

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-08-08

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, August 8,.1972

'age Twelve THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, August 8, 1972

Charges
on Bacon
dismissed
SEATTLE ()-A federal judge
dismissed a perjury charge Fri-
day against anti-war activist
Leslie Bacon, accused of lying
to a grand jurge investigating
the 1971 bombing of the U.S.
Capitol.
A spokesperson for the Justice
Department said the charge was
dismissed because "the decision
was made not to answer the de-
fendant's motion for disclosure
of electronic surveillance."
Bacon pleaded innocent to the
charge May 5, called the indict-
ment absurd, and later told
newsmen she had not been on
the Capitol grounds on March 1,
1971, the day of the bombing.
The bomb went off in a men's
room in the Senate wing of the
Capitol.
Bacon, 20, was charged with
knowingly making "false ma te-
rial declarations" when she de-
nied to a federal grand jury she
had visited the Capitol in Feb-
ruary, 1971.
U.S. District Judge Walter
McGovern dismissed the perjury
charge in Seattle on a request
frpm Assistant U.S. Atty. Ger-
ald Olson.
The FBI arrested Bacon in
Washington in 1971 as a material
witness to the explosion. She
was transferred to Seattle for a
grand jury investigation and
testified for three days but was
cited for contempt of court in
May 1971 for refusing to answer
18 questions despite an offer of
partial immunity.
Voters decide
primary today
(Continued from Page 1)
Harold Saunders, only 45 per-
cent of those registered are ex-
pected to vote today.
Almost 11 per cent of the
voters are in the 18-20 year old
bracket. The decidedly liberal
candidates are counting on
these voters for crucial votes.
Another fraction of the votes
coming in today, which are
considered decisive, are the ab-
sentee ballots. Many of the
positions in this primary will
be decided on by a small mar-
gin of votes. It has been pre-
dicted that at least one of the
contests will be decided by less
than 800 votes. With 4,200 ab-
sentee ballots outstanding, a
candidate could win or lose the
primary on absentee ballots
alone.
Saunders says his office must
receive the ballots by 7:00 to-
night, tohbebtransferred to the
counting stations and recorded.
VOTE TODAY-7

UNEXPECTED MOVE
Judge retains dig-in charges

(Continued from Page 1)
"unwinnable" for the prosecu-
tion.
Elden's action yesterday fol-
lowed his acceptance of the
prosecution's amendment, which
changes the charge to trespas-
sing and "digging up the lawn
and the earth beneath the lawn"
in violation of an 1887 statute.
Elden had stated last week
that he .dismissed charges
against Goldman because the
prosecution amendment hadnot
been filed within the court-
appointed deadline.
In yesterday's proceeding he
said that no court deadline or
order is official "unless it takes
the form of a written order,"
and said that no such deadline
order- had been made. Elden
had stated in the July 20 pro-
ceeding that the prosecution
could not file the amendment
after July 21.
Don Koster, defense attorney
for Plamondon, insisted that the

amendment had appeared three
days late.
"Am I to understand that it is
the practice of this court to
ignore its own deadlines?" he
asked Elden.
The judge did not respond
and declined Koster's request
for dismissal of charges.
In the pretrial for 27 persons
charged with destruction of
property in the June 17 crater
dig, the court's action changed
the actual charge to trespassing
and digging, in violation of the
same 85-year old statute being
brought against the three re-
maining May 19 crater dig de-
fendants.
Elden accepted the new com-
plaint, which named University
Safety Director Frederick Davids
as representing the complainant,
in spite of the fact that Davids
had not signed the complaint.
Such a complaint form is us-
ually considered invalid without
the complainant's signature.

Elden maintained that the
two ifferent charges are "based
on the same essential grounds"
and hence a new signature from
Davids, who signed the original
complaints, is not necessary.
Davids said yesterday that he
has not yet seen the new com-
plaint.
Bentley and Koster called the
court's action "a clear denial
of the right to due'process" and
said they would probably seek
higher court action against El-
den in both crater cases.
MUSK OXEN
Musk oxen need no barns and
little fodder. They eat about one
sixth of what cattle eat.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
The national parks system is
100 years old, this year. There
are 36 national parks covering
28 million acres, most of them
west of the Mississippi.

HELL OF A STONE
The largest hailstone ever
known to fall in the United
States was a grapefruit-size
lump of ice measuring 171/~
inches in circumference and
weighing 1.67 pounds. It fell
during a severe storm at Cof-
feyville, Kan., in September,
1970.
TOWER TALE
Melted down, all the iron in
Paris' 1,056-foot Eiffel Tower
would fill a cube only 33-feet
on side - or the size of a three
story house.
CARL F
for
SHERIFF
* EXPERIENCED
INTEGRITY
Vote Republican on Aug. 8
Paid political sdvertisleent

U

FISCHERor SASY
Pick the winner . ..and BE A WINNER!
WIN THIS CHESS SET'

VALUED AT OVER $100

-I

Courrtesy of
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and S MAAAIM AMM ARBR

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for
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paid political adveetisement
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CONTEST RULES: 3L1 "".'MAN,"An "AKVV
1. Fill out the coupon or a reasonable facsimile, and send or bring it to The Daily, 420 Moynard St., Ann Arbor
48104, att: Chess Contest. All entries must be postmarked (or received by us) by Noon, Monday, August 14.
(Office only open to receive entries brought in from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon.-Fri.)
2. The winner wil be chosen by The Michigan Daily on the basis of a) picking the winner, b) picking the nearest
game number, c) picking the closest final move number. In the event of a tie based on these criteria, the win-
ner wil be chosen as the first correct onswer received.
3. ONLY ONE ENTRY ALLOWED PER INDIVIDUAL. Persons entering more than once will be disqualified.
4. NO employees or staff members of The i -
Michigan Doily or the Board for Student
Publications are eligible. : I predict . . . . . . . . . . . . will win the World
5. The prize-the beautiful chess set and Chess Championship in the .... .... th game,
a wooden chess board-are being contri-
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to 37 S.MainSt.,Annhrbor will end on the ...... th move.
gage Shop, 327 S. Main St., Ann Arbor,
where the prize may be viewed in the store
window. NAME . .. . . ..........
6. The contest winner will be announced in ADDRESS......
The Doily in the issue folowing the conclu-
sion of the match. CITY.....................PHONE.

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