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July 29, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-07-29

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, July 29, 1972

PageEigt TH MIHIGA DALY aturayJuly29,197

Eagleton
says he'll

I

never qit
(Continued from Page 3)
Top McGovern aides are said
to be keeping close tabs on
newspaper editorials and the
opinions of the prestigious
Times and Post are bound to
weigh heavily.
Criticism mounted yesterday,
not only of Eagleton's tardy ad-
mission, but of the rushed se-
lection procedure employed by
McGovern's staff in choosing
him.
Although McGovern has said
he would have made the same
decision whether or not he had
been aware of Eagleton's med-
ical record, it is clear that Eag-
AP Photo leton was given little more than
a brief once over prior to the
nomination.
Is on Los ---- --
ed MAN
-RENT

BILLIARDS
TABLE TENNIS
FOOSBALL
BOWLING
UNION
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
D.W. GRIFFITH'S
BIRTH OF
A NATION
Probably THE film clas-
sic. Produced in 1914
this fi I m established
cinema as a serious art
form. Takes place during
post C i v i I War Recon-
struction. Its favorable
view of the KKK seems
outlandish today. None-
theless, a v e r y impor-
tant film.
A & D AUDITORIUM
75c-7 & 9:05
"
NEXT WEEK:
Fritz Long's
METROPOLIS

Good luck!
Former University of Michigan student David Schwartz spent $16000 for advertising placard
Angeles buses in an attempt to locate a girl who picked him up while hitchhiking.
U.S. STUDY:
'Minor' dike damage admitt

(continued from page i) of major dike bombings were
public, claiming that publica- "inaccurate." The denial was
tion would only provoke further repeated the next day by Presi-
allegations of d a m a g e from dential Press Secretary Ron
Hanoi. Ziegler who said Nixon's state-
The report of 12 bombed dike ment was "not meant to leave
locations follows Nixon's June open" the possibility of acci-
29 press conference statement dental dike bombings.
that reports from several sources In a new conference Thursday
-night shopping:
The American dream

(Continued from Page 3)
getting off work will come in
and buy a week's groceries," the
cashier continued. "But it's
mainly young kids who come in
and buy sna cks and stuff." When
the mpnchies come, something
must be done.
State law, however, prohibits
the sale of beer and wine from
two to seven in the morning, and
from two to noon on Sundays.
Opening the store to customers
24 hours a day costs Wrigley's
little additional expense. Tim
Brower, co-manager of Wrig-
ley's, said that "we can't lose"
as far as profits are concerned.
The lights are always kept on
anyway, and the night crew num-
bering six or seven hasn't been
increased.
But it isn't likely that all sup-
ermarket chains will follow. the
example set by the 43 Wrigley
stares that are open all night.
An assistant manager of the
Great Scott store at Packard
and Carpenter said he "wouldn't
like to see this store open 24
hours a day. It'd be hard to

stock . shelves with customers
around."
"It'd be good for factory work-
ers if we opened around th e
clock, but bad from a business
standpoint, with the overhead
and alt"he continued. "There
are just too many student shop-
pers for it to work around here."
The management of Great
Scott disagrees slightly, how-
ever. Great Scott is now open to
midnight six days a week and
closes at nine on Sundays.
In addition to the usual offers
of free encyclopedias and bar-
gains, Wrigley's has a Pinker-
ton guard on duty from t e n
o'clock to six in the morning.
"I really haven't had any trou-
ble," said the guard, who is a
graduate business student.
"My presence here is mainly a
preventive measure," he con-
tinued. "I prevent shoplifting
and their fire insurance is low-
er if a guard is here."
But every guard on duty at
Wrigley's carries a loaded re-
volver as standard equipment.

Nixon rejected a plea from
United Nations Secretary Gen-
eral Kurt Waldheim for the U.S.
to halt bombing of the dikes,
charging that Waldheim had
been "taken in by propaganda"
from Hanoi.
Nixon stated that it is "not
U.S. policy" to bomb the dikes
because "we are trying to avoid
civilian casualties, not cause
them."
He added that "there has been
no report of any flooding nor has
there been reports of any strikes
on the major dike areas."
The study claimed that "only
a deliberate and large-scale at-
tack" could substantially dam-
age the widely scattered dike
system.
Far East specialist Eqbal
Ahmed, who has loudly opposed
the alleged dike bombings, call-
ed the claim "an incredible lie,"
and claimed that enough U.S.
bombs have fallen on the dike
system to date that "all it will
take will be a single bombing
accident' to trigger flooding all
over the delta plain."
Ahmed said such flooding
would cause "anywhere from
half a million to a million deaths
from flooding and starvation."
Meanwhile, former U.S. Attor-
ney General Ramsey Clark join-
ed an international inquiry group
that will fly to Hanoi today to
inspect damage to the dikes.
Cinema It
PREtSENTS
the Great
FI ELU S
IN
The Pharmacist
The Fatal Glass of Beer
The Golf Specialist
The Barber Shop
plus selected shorts
Aud. A, Angell Hall
Friday and Saturday
7 & 9 p.m.
admission $1.00

RELIEF
democrat
state representative 3.
Paid Political Advertisement

MICHIGAN REPERTORY '72
LAST PERFORMANCE-TONIGHT 8 P.M.!
-H ' b5BRENDA d
00eS TAG F E NAa
-
INDIVIDUAL TICKETS $2.00, $3.00
in the air-conditioned
POWER CENTER
FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
Box Office open 12:30-$:00 Mon.-Fri
Phone 763-3333
STUDENT RUSH TICKETS AVAILABLE
DANCE
FRIDAY-SATURDAY AT 9:00
AND HIS
COURT OF RHYTHM
With ROBERT SHEFF on Piano
-and-
SUNDAY AT 8:30
WA HBOARD WILLIE
AND HIS
Su er Souds of RKhythm

Media Access Center
1st in a series of
WORKSHOPS
Workshop covers basic skills in using 1/2 inch
portable video equipment and production. One
weekly session for four weeks plus smaller group
work meetings dealing with recording and editing.
Workshop size is limited...
For application or information, call 761-7849 Sun.-
Mon.-Tues.
Lab fee- $35.00

217 S. Ashley

2 P.M.-2 A.M.

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