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July 21, 1972 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-07-21

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Page Nine

a Friday, July 21, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, July 21, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nkne

N
n eWS briefs
by The Associated Press

ADER NEGATED:

THE SENATE Foreign Relations Committee yesterday ap-
proved unanimously both strategic arms limitations agreements
made by President Nixon with the Soviet Union.
Under the procedure, the Senate leadership can bring them up
for consideration by the full Senate beginning Monday if the legisla-
tive traffic permits
"The evidence we have is that the Soviets are ready to start as
soon as we are," U.S. negotiator Gerard Smith told the House Foreign
Affairs Committee.
* *+ *t
SETTLEMENT of the "nation's longest and toughest labor
dispute" was announced yesterday in Washington.
An agreement protecting the jobs of the railroad industry's re-
maining 18,000 locomotive firemen was announced by M. W. Hampton,
assistant president of the AFL-CIO United Transportation Union.
The agreement calls for continued employment of the current
firemen until they retire, resign, die, are discharged for cause or
are promoted to locomotive engineer.
The dispute dates back to 1924 when the first diesel engines
were introduced that eventually replaced all the old coal-burning
steam locomotives on the nation's railroads.
CLIFFORD :IRVING emerged from seclusion yesterday and
said his book containing hitherto undisclosed details surrounding
his fraudulent autobiography of Howard Hughes was ready for
publication.0
Addressing a news conference 39 days before he is to go to
Prison, Irving said the 384-page book would "reveal for the frst
time" a number of facts connected with the affair, including the
name of a fourth person associated with the scheme.
INDIA IS READY to ship to North Vietnam high-yield rice
seeds developed from seedlings and research financed by Ameri-
can philanthropic foundations.
The project, however, has not gone any further than obtaining
necessary clearances from the Indian Foreign Ministry.
"Even if we wanted to send the seeds now, how are we to send
them?" a spokesperson asked, saying the shipment would be kept
out by American mines in North Vietnamese harbors.
The project began in the mid-1960's with seedlings imported from
the International Rice Research Institute near Manila, and was financ-
ed by the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations.
THE MARCH OF DIMES in Jefferson County, Kentucky sent
out a request for contributions this week but fine print in one
corner of the sheet carried this notation:
"Please participate. Your support is vital to the success of the
Republican Party in this all-important election year."
Approximately 8,000 Jefferson County residents are getting mailed
an apology for the printers mistake that left the March of Dimes
horrified.
THE MICHIGAN HOTDOG won a congressional reprieve yes-
terday from action that would have lowered its standards.
The House Agricultural Committee voted against an amendment
to a bill that would have forced Michigan to comply with less strict
packaged meat standards imposed by the federal government.
The Michigan law requires that packaged meats such as hotdogs,
bologna, sausage and meat loaf contain only skeletal fresh meat. Fed-
eral standards allow use of ears, snouts, lips, eyes, udders blad-
ders, tongues hearts, tripe. ears, snouts, lips and stomachs.
Summer Bargain Days
AT
MAST'S SHOES
Guys & Gals
HIKING BOOTS
20% OFF
FOR SUMMER BARGAIN DAYS
1-Group Men's Shoes
Sidewalk Bargains $10.00
1-Group Men's Sandals ..........$5.00
WOMEN'S SHOES
Sandals, Sport Shoes, Dress Shoes
$5.00 to $10.00

L1 _ M ST'S TI
61 9 E. Libey Open Tonight

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Govt. testing could disprove
charges of Corvair faults
WASHINGTON (P)-The gov- 1960-1963 Corvairs do not re- Corvairs in comparison
nment, which had been prod- sult in an abnormal potential other compacts and ans
d by Ralph Nader's charges for loss of control or rollover In no government tes
at early Corvairs were dan and it is as least as good as the Corvair roll over.
rously unstable, has con- performance of some contem- The government saidi
uded that the General Motors porary vehicles both foreign and tests, which included I
mpact is no more likely to domestic." turns and combined x
rn over than other cars of the The Corvair's handling char- turning manuevers, sho
me year and weight. acteristics were the first target Corvair has the same re
General Motors said the re- for Nader when he arrived in to turnover as General
rt "confirms our position on Washington as a young lawyer, claimed.
iehandling and stability char- GM's assignment of private in- After studing accident
teristics of these cars." vestigators to trail him vaulted tics, the government cc
Nader into public prominence that light cars like Co
The chief conclusion in the and his career as a wide- turn over more oftei
udy by the Department of ranging consumer advocate. heavier cars. But the
'ansportation's National High- The government study involv- indicate "the Corvair
ay Transportation Safety Ad- ed a review of Ford and General volved in a lower perce
inistration was, "The handling Motors track testing data of rollover accidents than
d stability performance of the outside experts. light domestic cars."

to four
lysis by
st did a
its track
hard J-
braking-
ied the
sistance
Motors
t statis-
ncluded
rvair do
m than
figures
was in-
ntage of
n other

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