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July 20, 1972 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-07-20

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, July 20, 1972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, July 20, 1972

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15 DEAD IN YEAR:
Mob war said to end soon

NEW YORK (R) -- Mafia chief-
tain Thomas "Tommy Ryan"
Eboli was borne to his grave
yesterday, the 15th victim in a
gang war which police say may
be too costly for the underworld
to sustain any longer.
Well-placed police sources spec-

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ulated that an order may be out
to New York's five Cosa Nostra
families to cool the gunplay
that began a year ago.
The only mobster deemed cap-
able of enforcing such an order
is Carlo "Don Carlo" Gambino,
described by federal authorities
as high commissioner of organ-
ized crime, the Mafia's "boss
of bosses."
Gambino is believed to have
at least tacitly endorsed t h e
shooting June 28, 1971, which left
Mafia leader Joseph Colombo
paralyzed and touched off t he
current underworld slaughter.
A Colombo associate has told
police that he and four o t h e r
henchmen of the wounded man
rubbed out Joseph "Crazy Joe"
Gallo last April 7 in a clam
house in Manhattan's Little
Italy. A rebel underling in t h e
Colombo family, Gallo was su-
spected of having a hand in Co-
lombo's shooting.
However, it was difficult to fit
the slaying of the 61-year-old
Eboli into the intricate pattern
of internecine warfare.
Eboli's was a caretaker role
in organized crime. He w as
made acting head of the Vito
Genovese Cosa Nostra family
when Genovese went to federal
prison on a narcotics rap. After
Genovese's death in prison in
1969, Gerardo "Jerry" Catena
assumed command. But he, too,
went to prison, and as his un-
derboss Eboli again became the
ranking family man.
Eboli was shot five times about
1 a.m. Sunday on a quiet resi-

dential street in Crown Heights.
Brooklyn, far from his Manhat-
tan haunts and his Fort Lee.
N.J., residence.
Meanwhile, reputed New Eng-
land Mafia boss Raymond Pa-
triarca told the House S e le c t
Crime Committee yesterday that
he had never had any dealings
with Frank Sinatra and "never
met the gentleman in my life."
However Patriarca took t h e
Fifth Amendment on most of the
committee's questions concern-
ing his and Sinatra's alleged fin-
ancial involvement in the now-
defunct Berkshire Downs race-
track near Hancock, Mass.
Patriarca, a short, thin man,
was transported to the House
hearing room from Atlanta Fed-
eral Prison where he is serving
a ten year sentence for murder
conspiracy.
While refusing to answer more
important questions, Patriarca
freely answered others includ-
ing his opinion of "The God-
father" novel and film about
organized crime.
"In my opinion it was a good
book," he said. ". . . People like
to read that."
Patriarca said he had heard
Sinatra was an officer at Berk-
shire Downs only from reading
it in the paper. He was asked if
he had read of any other in-
vestors in the track.
"Yeh. Me," he replied.
"I read I had $215,000 in Berk-
shire Downs," he said. "I wish
I had. I never had $215,000 in
my life."

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UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
CLOSED ALL DAY SATURDAYS
THROUGH AUGUST 12

Work bill
defeated'
b)v House
Dems outvoted
WASHINGTON (MP - The
House killed a $5-billion emer-
gency job-making public-works
bill yesterday after crippling it
with an amendment barring use
of the money this year.
The vote was 189 to 206.
The amendment that lined up
the bill for the death blow was
heavily backed by Republicans
and opposed by Democrats.
It said the money couldn't be
committed for contracts in any
year in which the projected
federal deficit exceeds $20 bil-
lion. That figure probably will
be excfeded by $10 billion for
the fiscal year that started
July 1.
The amendment was adopted
by vote of 205 to 192.
The House action was a vic-
tory for Republicans and a
major setback for the Demo-
cratic leadership.
Republicans called the meas-
ure unnecessary, inflationary,
political and a duplication of
existing programs. It was op-
posed' by the Nixon administra-
tion.
Democrats led by speaker
Carl Albert of Oklahoma claim-
ed the bill was needed to quick-
ly provide 500,000 construction
jobs and help states and local
governments build needed water
and sewage plants and other
public facilities.
The $5-billion projected ex-
penditure would have been in
the form of federal grants, in
many cases for the full amount
of project costs. The bulk of it
was expected to finance working
projects within 90 days of en-
actment.
House Democrats claimed
Tuesday that they had enough
votes not only to pass the bill
but to override the expected
veto.
The bill was rushed through
the House Banking and Cur-
rency Committee as an emer-
gency measure to provide jobs
in a hurry.
The grants would have been
available to all communities,
with priorities for economically
depressed areas and rural re-
gions with rising uneploy-
ment.
Albert criticized the Nixon ad-
ministration for having "no
foreseeable job-producing initia-
tive and showing no concern for
the problem."
GOP leader Gerald Ford of
Michigan called the bill "un-
necessary duplication and a
waste of the taxpayers money."
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