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July 19, 1972 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-07-19

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Wednesday, July 19, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Wednesday, July 9, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

Galleries offer local art
buffs choice of works

(Continued from Page 6)
substantial pieces by profession-
al artists.
She rejects the idea of art
created for the moment,. or
standards for the moment, or
standards of art which may not
prove durable, "We haven't
jumped from one fad to ano-
ther," she said, giving as ex-
amples of fads pop, op, and
hardedge art.
Further downtown is the Py-
ramid Gallery, younger and less
comfortably established. It is a
rather sparse gallery, with a
large hardwood floor and white
walls. It becomes more relaxed
because people at the gallery are
quick to talk to you, offer to
discuss the paintings with you,
and begin calling you by your
first name.
They are very antagonistic to-
ward any elitism in art. "Art is
fun; it should be enjoyed by
just people," the director Mar-
ty Nyrkkanan said. The gallery
would like to reach people be-
yond the small percentage who
have traditionally bought art.
A large part of the gallery'sN
business comes from what they
call the Gallery Exchange Pro-
gram. The idea of the program
is to give people a chance to
learn what kind of art they en-
joy. Under the program, mem-
bers take home different paint-
ings or prints every month, keep
them in their home, and get
some feeling for what it is they
like or dislike about them.
Essential to the idea of the gal-
lery is that it should represent
a genuinely wide range of styles
of art. Nyrkkanan said a typical
member of the program will
start out choosing the more real-
istic pieces, but by six months
will be taking home and apprec-
lating works as contemporary
as the geometrical, completely
abstract paintings he was ex-
hibiting then. The gallery look

at the program as educational
as well as a means to sell art.
The Lantern Gallery does not
aim at any particular type of
clientele, but the people who
come there are generally people
who "know what they're looking
for," one of the two women who
owns the gallery, Alice Simsar,
explained. They are "looking for
what's happening currently in
art."
The bulk of their clients are
"40 to 45" or under, and they
are more likely to be graduate
students than undergraduates.
The art shown .at the Lantern
is consistently more modern
than any of the other galleries.
Simsar described it as "very
contemporary and yet not to
the ultra-experimental." By my
standards it has the most so-
phisticated art of any of the
galleries.
Like the Pyramid Gallery, the
Lantern Gallery has a special
art program, called the Collec-
tor's Club, although it is some-
what different. Membership is
limited to 25 couples, and it is
designed to "acquaint them with
what's going on." They show
films and bring in artists. One
of the things that has made the
club very popular is that gallery
artists have made series of
prints exclusively for its mem-
bers.
Two of the galleries in Ann
Arbor deal in rather specific
kinds of art. The Judlo Gallery,
in the basement of Logos Book-
store deals primarily in arts and
crafts, especially arts and crafts
by Southwest American Indians.
It is one of the few private gal-
leries in Ann Arbor which will
show student work.
The gallery is now restricted
in size by the children's book
section of the bookstore, and
thus seems more like a shop
than a gallery. But it is still a
very interesting shop, and par-
ticularly authentic. Most of the
See CITY, Page 11

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