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July 19, 1972 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-07-19

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Wednesday, July 19, 1972 t

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page. Three

Wednesday, July 19, 1972 THE MICHiGAN DAILY Page. Three

CONCERTS PLANNED:
Art students, faculty to
show works at free fair

TORONTO FESTIVAL
Mariposa: Folk at its best

By LORIN LABARDEE
The students will be in the
streets again today but not for
the usual reasons. There will, be
no marching or demonstrating.
Rather, the students and o t h e r
University people will take to
the streets to display their art
work. Accompanying the Street
Art Fair will be the Free Art
Fair, many of whose exhibitors
are University faculty and stu-
dents.,
Diane Libstorff, one of the co-
ordinators of this year's free
fair, reports that there will be
approximately 350 exhibitors in
this fair. Numerous applications
were turned down due 'to lack
of space.
The fair is under the co-spon-
sorship of the University Activi-
ties Center (UAC) and the Of-
fice of Special Services and Pro-
grams (OSSP). Together they
are organizing the distribution of
display sites, publicity, entertain-
ment and sanitation services.
About the need for tw'o art
fairs, Tom Clark of OSSP says,
"The free fair is for members
of the University to have an op-
portunity to exhibit their work."
He explained that the street fair
is not suitable for the students
because its organizers employ
both a tight jury system and an
entry fee of up to $25, two ,fac-
tors which act to close the street
fair to many students and other
University people.
A jury, in this case, is a group
of art critics who judge t h e
quality of an artist's work. ,
In contrast to the street fair's
entrance requirements, the free
fair does not ask the artist to
pass a jury and requires only a
$1 entrance fee.
This $1 fee will go to cover the
expenses of the fair and will be
supplanted by a total $1,000 bud-
geted to UAC for the free fair.
Although there would seem to
be a high level of competition
between the two fairs, Clark re-

ports that there has been much
cooperation between the organ-
izers of the fairs.
Problems of interest to b o tih
fairs, such as traffic flow and
services, have been settled in
meetings between the two groups.
For the entertainment at the
fairs there will be a stage which
will be shared by both s t r e e t
fair people and free fair people.
F r e e fair organizers have
scheduled only one program for
the stage, a number of s h o r t
skits by performers from t h e
Office of Equal Opportunty
!OEO)
Much of the entertainment pro-
vided by the free fair will take
the form of concerts by local
rock groups. Most of the groups
will be volunteering their serv-
ices for the purpose of expos-
ure to the Ann Arbor audienc.
Originally UAC had planned
to have the groups play ons the
Diag, a site close to the fair and,
until recently the traditional site
for open air concerts at the Uni-
versity.
For reasons which remain un-
clear, University officials ar e
forcing UAC to schedule t h e
concerts for the, People's Plaza.
Although this location is much
less suitable for its proximity to
the fair, Clark remains confident
that the concerts will still draw
large crowds.
Offering fresh talent in boilh
art and music Clark emphasises
that the "major focus of the free
fair is fun," but for the con-
flicts that might develop the or-
ganizers will provide UAC people
and encourage "self-policing me-
chanisms." They are trying to
avoid the use of Ann Arbor po-
lice for anything other than
traffic control.
One understandable element
which seems fairly unavoidable is
the state sales tax.
For the' first time in the fair's
history, artists will be required
to charge state sales tax on all
transactions.

By DIANE LEVICK
Againstsabackdrop of the
Toronto skyline, across the bay
of Lake Ontario, the 1972 Mari-
posa Folk Festival opened last
Friday for a fascinating three-
day run, complete with Wood-
stock-vintage johns and thun-
dershowers-and a few surprise
appearances by "superstars."
With six mini-concerts or
workshops going on simultan-
eously all day, it was damn
frustrating trying to pick which
to attend. People wandered from
one tent to the next on Centre
Island, trying to decide between
Owen McBride's spirited Irish
rebellion songs (he has appeared
locally at the Ark): John Prine,
an up-and-coming Kristofferson

discovery; and a blues work-
shop.
Festival-goers found it even
more frustrating to learn of Joni
Mitchell's surprise appearance
at one of the tents after she
had left. The festival, though,
wasn't planned around "big
names."
Instead, it presented some of
the best-thougs not famous--
performers in traditional bal-
lads, blues, bluegrass, Indian,
African, Middle Eastern, and
African folk dancing, and topi-
cal folk.
The festival-goers, who were
nearly all in the 18 to 30 year-
old range, were attracted in
especially large numbers to
min-concerts by Taj Mahal,

and David Bromberg. John
Prine, who dedicated his Your
Flag Decal Won't Get You Into
Heaven Anymore to the ultra-
right ing Rev. Carl McIntire,
drawled out his lyrics to an
ever-growing audience.
On Sunday. before the after-
noon heat and overwhelming
crow'ds cause, folk fans gathered
by the bay shore to watch sail-
boats and listen to Kentucky's
Jean Ritchie host a religious
music program.
For those who didn't mind
stoshing throuh dcalf-deep mud
fronm the Saturday rains-and
few did-the crafts area dis-
played handmade candles, pew-
ter, jewelry, weaving, and
leather goods.
Later on Sunday afternoon,
Bonnie Raitt ended her act by
introducing an unscheduled per-
formance by Jackson Brown,
,who sang a reminiscent "Sweet
Little 16." But wait a minute!
Wasn't that Joni Mitchell's face
peering over the tent flap out at
the audience? Yes indeed, but
she wouldn't perform.
Shortly after, screams of
ecstasy came from another tent
area and heavy applabse be-
trayed the appearance of an-
other superstar. Thousands of
lovers of esoteric folk music
turned slightly teeny-bopper,
rushing to that stage to see,. .
Neil Young!
Appropriately enough, he be-
gan with "There is a town in
North Ontario" from Helpless,
Helpless. Called back, of course,
for an encore. Young provoked
a communalr"Ooooh!" from lis-
teners when he broke into
Heart of Gold.

NEIL YOUNG performs Sugar Mountain and other favorites in
a surprise appearance at the Mariposa Folk Festival in Toronto
Sunday.

BAIAIN DAYS at
Starts Today at 9 A.M.-Open till
9 P.M. Wed., Thurs., Fri.-Sat. 5:30

Harrington's Bookstore
S of ti ,
MAGAZINES
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and supplies
PLENTY OF PUBLIC PAR- ING
AT REAR OF STORE
HOURS: Daily 7:30 to 9 p.m
a:8a.m. toSpm.
611 CHURCH t( ' block from S. University) 665-7530

famous MakeSU T
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for as much as
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( '.ยง_:
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FRANK'S
Sunday Dinner
Special
$2.25

CHOICE OF

BAKED HAM
BAKED CHICKEN
SERVE WITH:
Vegetable;

ROAST PORK
ROAST TURKEY
Soup or Juice-Potatoes-
Crisp Salad Beverage

--ALSO-
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FEATURE
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