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May 10, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-05-10

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page three

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Wednesday. May 10. 1972

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

News Phone: 764-0552

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RPP launches pot
legalization initiative

World leaders criticize
new Nixon Viet plan

By DIANE LEVICK
* Answering years of talk with
constructive action, the Ann Ar-
bor Rainbow People's Party
(RPP) has launched a campaign
to place the question of legaliz-
ing marijuana on Michigan's
Aug. 8 ballot.
Calling the drive the Michigan
Marijuana Initiative, RPP is cir-
culating petitions across the state
which urge amendment of the
state constituion. RPP needs sig-
naures by July 10 from 256,000
registered Michigan voters to put
the issue on the ballot.
"We'll probably need over
300,000 signatures, though," says
RPP member David Fenton,
"because the government is go-
ing to try to invalidate them."
The extra signatures will serve
as a margin of safety.
The petition itself states that
"No person in the state of Mich-
igan who is over 18 years of age
shall be subject to arrest or
criminal prosecution or be denied
any right or privilege for any
of the following actions."
The "actions" include posses-

sion, personal use of, cultivating,
harvesting drying, processing, or
other ways of preparing or trans-
porting marijuana for personal
use.
"It doesn't cover people driv-
ing vehicles or sale of mari-
juana or people under 18" Fen-
ton says, "but we had to make
the petition broad enough so that
a lot of people would sign."
Perry B u Il a r d, Democratic
candidate for state representa-
tive, helped draft the petition's
wording. "I think the RPP is go-
ing to have to- move out and get
the support of the civil liber-
tarians and the do-gooders for
this," Bullard said.
At Monday night's city council
meeting, however, Mayor Robert
Harris declined to sign the pe-
tition as it was passed to him.
He could not be reached for
comment, Councilman N o r r i s
Thomas (D-First ward) and Nel-
son M e a d e (D-Third ward
signed.
Anyone interested in helping
with the Marijuana Initiative
See RPP, Page 11

"THE FIRST
REALLY FUNNY
X-RATED
MOVIE EVER
MADE ! A
CLEVER AND
BRILLIANT SATIRE
-Kevin Saunders, ABC-TV
"THE ONLY
REALLY FUNNY
MOVIE SINCE
WOODY ALLEN'S
'BANANAS'."
-Roger Greenspun, New York Times
"...ITS MIND IS SO SANE, ITS
IMAGINATION SO FREE, AND
ITS FANTASIES SO LOGICAL,
THAT IT BECOMES SOMETHING
EVEN MORE RARE THAN GOOD
SATIRE, THAT IS, IT BECOMES
GOOD DIRTY SATIRE.
-Vincent Canby, New York Times
RELEASED BY U M FM FDISTRISUTO RSINC
COLOR Sr OVWAMX
7:00 Persons Under
and FFHV U~TLBRY , 18
9:00F A N7-NotAdmitted

tt strife at (iI IzHA .*
A policeman yesterday stands between strikers and cars at the
Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities (CPHA). A
major demonstration is planned today by the strikers' union, at
the CPHA Green Rd. headquarters.
RACISM CHARGED:
Probe continues on
black housing units
By MARCIA ZOSLAW
Both legal and committee action continues to probe the
issue of black living-cultural units rejected by the Regents
as "segregationist" last March.
The proposal would have established separate corri-
dors at South Quad and Stockwell Hall for 400 students
who had expressed an interest in Afro-American culture.
Before the Regents' decision, 103 students-73 black and
30 white-had been accepted to live in the units, according
to University Housing officials.
Eight black students have al-
ready filed a complaint with the
Michigan Civil Rights Commis-
sion, calling the Regents' deci-
sion a "racist" denial of educa-
tional and housing opportunities
to blacks. campusF
According to Lee Gill, one of
the students who filed the com- By Paul Travis
plaint, it is well on its way to The
becoming a class action suit heUniversity and the city
against the University. "We feel have reached an agrcement to
that our rights as blacks have provide police protection for the
been constitutionally denied un- University
der the equal protection clause," The "University Unit" of the
Gill said yesterday. He- added Ann Arbor Police Department
that he is considering seeking an as planned will consist of 23
injunction against the Regents' sworn full time officers to pa-
decision. trol the University area on a
Meanwhile, a student-faculty round-the-clock basis, according
committee has begun investigat- to a joint statement issued last
See BLACKS, Page 10 Friday by Police Chief Walter
-- Krasny and University Director
of Safety Frederick Davids.
The unit, which should be in
full operation by Sept. 1, will
DIAL 8-6416
Ending Tonight ' 1 {
"Claire's "'THE GODFATHER' IS
Knee" HAVE EVERYTHING!
and NOSTALGIA, THE CHARIT
"The IN ONE OF HIS FINEST
Go Between" THE DYNASTIC SWEEP 0
'GONE WITH
Thursday-_-Time
Academy Award Winner ''
"BEST PICTURE"
"The=
French
Connection"
and
"The Mog us" DIAL 665-6290

From Wire service Reports -
Reaction by U.S. and
world leaders to President
Nixon's plan to cut off
North Vietnamese supply
lines was almost uniformly
critical.
A few nations, most notably
South Vietnam and Britain,
voiced hope that Nixon's deci-
sion would hasten the war's end.
But the Soviet Union, which
provides most of North Viet-
nam's technical equipment and
weapons, has remained silent.
White House sources said yes-
ter Nixon hopes his quarantine
of North Vietnam will not derail
his planned Soviet summit talks.
Henry Kissinger, the Presi-
dent's assistant for national se-
curity affairs, told a White
House news conference Nixon
realizes his attempt to block
arms-carrying Russian ships
from Haiphong and other
Northern ports confronts Soviet
leaders with "short-term difficul-
ties."
However, Kissinger said the
chief executive still believes the
two superpowers are on the
verge of forging "a new era in
East-West relations" that could
be spurred by Nixon's planned
May 22-29 visits to Moscow,
Leningrad and Kiev.
The first Soviet response came
from the official news agency
Tass which accused Nixon of
"naked aggressive acts" in viola-
tion of international law. Tass
said nothing about the status of
the summit.
In a six- paragraph statement
under a Washington dateline
distributed after Nixon's an-
nouncement Monday night, Tass
disputed the Psesident's state-
ment the United States wants to
end the war.
See REACTION, Page 11
ty finalize
olice unit
have four officers on duty at all
,times. The costs to the Univer-
sity are estimated at $410,000
annually.
Police-Community Relations
Lt. Kenneth Klinge has been
picked by Krasny to head the
University unit. Klinge has been
the department's Police-Com-
munity Relations officer since-
1964.
The unit will patrol the Cen-
tral Campus, North Campus,
and athletic area and operate
out of city police headquarters.
Chief Krasny said that be-
See 'U', Page 10

[1

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F AN ITALIAN-AMERICAN
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