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July 12, 1972 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-07-12

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Wednesday, July 12, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

s i a
e- °

I4e +JEirligan tily
is a
Great Paper!

Non-delegates split over
protest tactics in Miami

ItI'rs0L Ashop
JULY
BARGAIN DAYS
AT
WILD'S
VARSITY.
SHOP
TAKE ADVANTAGE
OF OUR
for
SLAX SALE
SELECT
ANY TWO
PAIRS OF
OUR WOVEN
CASUAL
PERMA-PRESS
SLAX. PAY
REGULAR
PRICE FOR
ONE PAIR
THE OTHER
PAIR IS
..2h FREE
ALSO REDUCED:
some Raincoats, Sportcoats, and Shirts
State Street on the Campus
Open Friday Nights Till 8:30

(Continued from Page 3) ments over where the march
operation in military style. "F should go, they soon grew weary
to S-1, we need about six more and retired to a rock concert at
marshals on the right flank," Flamingo Park.
the walkie-talkies crackled. By ten o'clock the streets
About two thousand people- around the convention hall were
mostly VVAW, SDS, and Zip- practically deserted.
pies - marched through the Earlier in the afternoon, the
streets winding up at the con- Zippies staged what had to be
vention around seven. the most macabre demonstration
They were slowed considerab- held here.
ly by the efforts of the Miami As part of a "Wheelchairs for
police to maintain a five-block Wallace" demonstration, about
distance between the demon- 150 people marched over to the
strators and militant anti-Cas- convention hall early in the af-
tro Cubans gathered down the ternoon.
street. At the head of the march was
But while the police were suc- a wheelchair bearing an effigy of
cessful in separating the two the Alabama governor. Some of
mutually hostile groups, the the marchers wore masks depict-
young radicals found them- ing the face of Arthur Bremer,
selves battling from within. Wallace's would-be assassin, and
Amidst demands for "an open 'chanted: "Free Art Bremer, give
microphone," and di s a g r e e- him another chance."
Prisoners try to organize
(Continued from Page 3) be a minimum wage."
rections-which runs state pri- According to the Prisoners'
sons-to protest "unfair labor Solidarity Committee (PSC),
practices." prisoners are paid 10 cents to
A public hearing before MERC 35 cents per day and produce
on these charges is set for Aug. men's and women's clothing for
14. street wear, shoes, office furni-
"There has been substantial ture, brushes, license plates, and
harassment, threats, and union all state highway signs.
busting," says Farmer. At Mar- Farmer points out that prison
quette Prison, where 30 per cent labor undercuts outside free
of the inmates did sign union labor on wages and adds to the
petitions, the petitions were con- unemployment rate.
fiscated, according to Farmer. Johnson comments, "Our po-
Shortly after a WCAR radio sition on the union is that it's
interview with prisoner-organ- a rather pointless gesture." He
izers June 25, union leader Ervin calls the union "a serious hazard
Hurston was transferred from to the institution" because any
Jackson to Marquette. potential strike would affect the
Jackson Warden Perry John- daily life of such a tight-knit
son says, "He requested that community.
transfer," but does not know the "You have tensions, and a po-
reason. Prisoner attorney Farm- tential for violence to develop."
er, who has received mail from he says.
Hurston, says, "Hurston didn't He says that Jackson's budget
want to go." . of about $15 million per year
Charles Thompson, another does not allow the kind of wages
Jackson organizer was trans- union organizers are pushing for
ferred July 5 to the Detroit and that 10 per cent of the in-
House of Corrections. mates earn an average of $1.50
"As I understand it," says -not 35 cents-a day. "I don't
Johnson, "he wanted to go." But believe it's exploitation," he
Farmer replies, "I doubt very says,
much that he could've requested Meanwhile, a campaign out-
the transfer." side the prisons is being organ-
Diana Romanchuk, Human ized to publicize inmates' com-
Rights Party (HRP) member, plaints. PSC held an informa-
says organizing inmates are al- tional rally last Saturday in
so harassed over their parole. Detroit.
"Jackson prison o b v i o u s y HRP, which has voted to sup-
doesn't want a union in there port the prisoners' unions, plans
because the first demand would to hold a local rally July 22.
OPEN
i E ll 1:15
Shown of
1:30
4 P.M.
6:30
9 P.M.
DIAL 662-6264

Page Seven
HRP proposal
passes Council
-Cnt -oagoa1
chet charged that the commis-
sion members have deliberately
inhibited public input by pub-
lishing only minimal notice of
its "decisions and public meet-
ings. He said that at a recent
meeting about 30 people were
given the "classic runaround"
and were greeted with "an atti-
tude that could only be con-
strued as a form of medieval
despotism."
After hearing a list of charges
against the commission, Mayor
Robert Harris said that a copy
of Shoichet's statement should
be sent to Commission Chair-
person Sidney Winter and that
a reply should be sent to the
council. De Grieck said he will
ask that a public hearing be
held on the matter before next
week's voting.
Council also agreed to vote
next week on an ordinance that
would permit the establishment
of day care centers in resi-
dential neighborhoods without
approval of the Zoning oard
of Appeals.
If passed, the measure would
facilitate the creation of cen-
ters in homes situated on
streets with low traffic volumes
in the city.
Cosatil iito discu s
airport proposal
(Continued from Page 1)
port "self-sufficient" because 6f
increased revenue from hangar
rentals, fuel tax receipts and
federal reimbursement for land
purchases which the city has al-
ready made.
If the expansion plan is not
approved, says Harris, state and
federalmoney for the runways
and land purchases will no
longer be forthcoming. The air-
port will not carry the volume
of traffic necessary to become
self-sufficient and the city will
have to cover, not only airport
operations as it has in the past,
but also the recent land pur-
chases-a total of $140,000, ac-
cording to the city administra-
tor's office.
Eight council votes are re-
quired to amend the city budget
once it is approved. If council
votes down the expansion plan
and later deadlocks on the is-
sue of where to cut the budget,
the final decision will be made
by Guy Larcom, city administra-
tor.
Larcom says that he "hasn't
faced up to the problem" of
possible cuts because council
has yet to act.
ATTENTION

MICHIGAN I
REPERTORY-IL

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LABOUR'S LOST gelbert, shevelove, & sondheim
bednbehan's July 18-29 * A FUNNY THINGp
TH* OTG HAPPENED ON THE Aug8-i12
E WAY TO THE FORUM
OPENING JULY 18
POWER CENTER SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS
Box Office Open $7.00, $10.50
12:30-5:00 p.m. INDIVIDUAL TICKETS
Ph.: 763-3333 $2.00, $3.00

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