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July 08, 1972 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-07-08

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILtY

Saturday, July 8, 1 972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAIlY Saturday, July 8, 1972

CAL DELEGATES:
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN McGovern setback

Poor peoples' coalition
disrupts Dems' meeting

SATURDAY, JULY 8
Music School: Gale Kramer, organ
doctoral, Hill Aud, 8 p.m.
SUNDAY, JULY 9
TV Center Film: 'Challenge of Chal-
lenge," WWJ-TV, Channel 4. noon.
MONDAY, JULY 10
SACUA Meeting: 4 fl., Admin. Bldg.,
2 s~i,.
Audio-Visual Center Films: "Eth-
nic Minorities: Chicano," "Ballad of
Crawlast," "Nort1hAmerlean Indan,,
Pt. I: Tatis ade , ' ea sB oken
Eskimo Fight for Life," Aud. 4, MLB,
7 p.m.
Carillon Concert: William DeTurk,
Burton Memorial Tower, 7 p.m.
Music School:. Michael Stoune, flute
doctoral, Sch. of Music Recital Hall,
8 p.m.
CAREER PLANNING
AND PLACEMENT
3200 SAB
INTERVIEW: Foremost Insurance
Co., Gd. Rapids, July 13, for a Pub.
Relations Asst., pref. MA in advs.,
jxurn.,en . orerelated field BA iA
aspac, in pub, rel. or witing sili; sal
764-7460 for appts, beginning July 5,
or come in; resume by July 10.
ANNOUNCEMENT: UCLA has four
yr. grad fellowship to be filled within
a month. Mich. grads with good scho-
lastic standing contact: Prof. N. Alex-
opuolos, Div. of Elec. Sciences, UCLA,
L.A., Calif. 90024.

(Continued from Page 1)
reques's by both the party and
the Daley contingent for a full
hearing on the issues.
The circuit court ruled two
days ago that the Credentials
Committee overstepped its au-
therity in ordering the Califorsia
dolegf'tes apportioned among all
the winner-take-all primary.
The Supreme Court said "In
light of the availability of the
convention as a forum to review
the recommendations of the'
Credentials Committee, . . . the
lack of precedent to support the
extraordinary relief granted by
the Court of Appeals and the
large public interest in allowing
the political processes to func-
tion free from judicial super-
vision, we conclude the judg-
ments of the Court of Appeals
must ha stayed."
The decision came at a special
session of the court, only its
fourth in history.
Voting in the majority were
Chief Justice Warren Burger,
and Justices Harry Blackmun.
Potter Stewart, Lewis Powell,
William Rehnquist, and William
Brennan Jr.

Brennan was not present at
the court but the unsigned ma-
jority opinion said he concurred
in the decision.
Dissenting were Justices Mar-
shall, William Douglas and
Byron White.

(Continued from Page 1)
ed to remain and the committee
resumed its session.
Those involved with convention
planning told the disrupters
snace for 750 unofficial "dele-

The Yippies and the Zippies
set up camp in Miami Beach

(Continued from Page 3)
Rubin. Abbie Hoffman, and poet
Allen Ginsberg.
Ann Arbor was represented by
Rev. Mark Harris of the Can-
terbury House. Harris is one of
400 members of the Religious
and Community Members Con-
cerned, who have arrived here.
Aside from the organizational
activities of rumor control groups
and the Yippie leaders, most of
the action centered on rapping
with shuffle-board playing sen-
ior citizens, looking for dope-
the price of marijuana here has
inflated to $25 an ounce - and
watching television crews watch
the campers.
Little of yesterday's activity
seemed to have a great deal to
do with the Democratic Conven-
tion, the reason why most of the
campers came to Miami in the
first place.
Although a few young people

discussed the economy, the war
and the presidency with a seem-
ingly interested audience of older
people, most of the talk was
about dope and much of the ac-
tion mere frolicking.
Things may change today
when Rev. Ralph Abernathy and
his supporters arrive to set up
their Resurrection City II in the
park, and when more of the ex-
pected 5,000 demonstrators show
up.
In the meantime, Miami
Beach's Flamingo Park, with its
solitary Bunyan tree, is a far cry
from p r e v i o u s revolutionary
campgrounds.
In fact, the most heated mo-
ment of the day came when an
elderly lady shouted at her in-
credulous husband, "those hip-
pies are very nice people.
There's nothing wrong with
them, so shut up."
He did.

I~~~ iUnIE 3UE
Youll Enjoy It
Ribeye Steak
Lunch $1.39
3035 Washtenaw across from Lee Oldsmobile

lfO.J IiT OUTTIIEACII
Summer Half-Term
TENTATIVE LIST OF PROJECTS TO BE OFFERED:
> Child Care Action Center
Investigations of Mental Instit. and Prisons
Northville State Hospital
Project Transition
T-group
Wayne County Child Devel. Center
IF INTERESTED, YOU MUST ATTEND MASS
-MEETING ON MONDAY, JULY 10, 7:30 P.M.,
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL.

gates" simply isn't available.
Instead, they have suggested
that the group be granted 10
seats in the visitors gallery-an
offer the coalition has scoffed at.
NWRO's George Wiley has
threatened "direct action both
inside and outside the convn-
tion floor" if the 750 aren't al-
lowed in,
More significant however, is a
threat to withhold support of
the Democratic nominee if an
agreement isn't reached. "if the
Democrats close the doors
against the poor people," SCLCi
Rev. Ralph Abernathy warned
yesterday, "we will have to cloe
the voting booths to the Demo-
cratic Party."
Following the disruption of the
committee meeting, DNC chair-
man Lawrence O'Brien-who had
left when the protesters entered
-returned to announce that a
subcommittee would attempt to
negotiate a reasonable compro-
mise" with the protesting groups.
The first subcommittee mee
ing yesterday afternoon was un-
eventful and it remained very
unclear whether anything would
be worked out in time for the
convention's opening Monday.
Rennie Davis, who represented
PCPJ in the meeting, said, "I
really don't know whether the
Democrats will offer anything
that we can accept."
For the Democrats, the most
crucial issue is the election.
While it is hard to believe that
the poor people's groups would
actively support Nixon; their
apathy could have a chilling ef-
feet on Democratic election
chances. Such groups as SCLC
and NWRO exert a considerabl
influence in the black and poor
community -traditional sources
of support for the party.
Also, charges that the conven-
tion underepresents the poor hit
hard in a year when party lead-
ers have boasted of their "open
convention" under the McGovern-
Fraser reforms.
For the coalition, there is no
particular advantage in sitting
out the election, especially .f the
nominee is George McGovern
whom many of them see as pref-
erable to President Nixon.
As Abernathy said yesterday,
"We want to beat Nixon, we just
don't want the Democratic party
to take poor people for granted."
Any solution which will be ac-
ceptable to both sides will be
hard to come by.
DIAL 668-6416
FOR SHOW TIMES
NAME YOUR POISON!
W. BEATTY-J. CHRISTIE
MRS.MILLER

WORSHIP

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon.
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00-noon,
CANTERBURY HOUSE
Canterbury House, meeting at its own place
(603 E, William St.-over Mark's Coffee-
house), 11:00 a.m
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. t. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
10:00 a.m. - Worship Service and Church
School.

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor-971-3152
Sunday School---9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Training Hour-6:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.--Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years).
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. --
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
For transportation call 668-6427.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Minister: Rev. Donald Postem
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH, formerly the Lutheran
Student Chapel and Center
801 South Forest at Hill
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
Sunday, 10:15 a.m.-Fol Mss.
Wednesday, 5:15 p.m -Eucharist.
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist and Sermon.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(LCMS) 1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday morning at 9:00-Bible Study.
Sunday morning at 10:15-Worship Service.
Wednesday evening at 9:00-Midweek Wor-
ship,
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Services of Worship--9:00 and 10:30 a.m.-
Sermon: "One-Ness in Mission." Preach-
ing: Howard F. Gebhart.
Bible Study at 10:30 a.m.
Holy Communion-5:15 Thursdays.

-PLUS-
DEALING:
OR THE BERKELEY-TO-BOSTON
FORTY-BRICK LOST-BAG BLUES
DEALING tells the story of the
weed "underground railroad"
between the coasts. From the
filmmaker who brought you
"The Revolutionary"

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