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July 08, 1972 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-07-08

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Page Two
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
MEET THE Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
UM BARBERS Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
UMBRES igan. 420 Maynard St., AnArbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
Che4, Dave, Harold, & Jay day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity ,year. Subscription rates: $10 by
Open 8:30-5:15 p.m. carrier. a11 by ma$.
Summer Session published Tuesday
Mon.-Sat. through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
MICHIGAN UNION area; $6.50 localmai (in Mich. or
Oh o); $7.50 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
CO-OP LIVING
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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, July 8, 1972

cinema--
U' Film Showcase set

By DIANE LEVICK
Social commentary - on sub-
jects ranging from the plas-
ticity of modern man to the
plight of American Indians-
will be a major focus of the
University's Summer F i 1 m
Showcase.
Starting Monday, the Uni-
versity's Audio - Visual Educa-
tion Center will show free films
to the public Mondays through
Thursdays until Aug. 3.
Shown in the Modern Lan-
guage Building, Aud. 4 at 7 p.m.
the movies will include such
works as Chicano, which ques-
tions whether Mexican - Amer-
icans must forsake their cultur-
al identity to gain equal edu-

cational and financial opportu-
nities in this nation.
Ballad of Crowfoot, which will
be screened Monday, portrays
the history of Western Cana-
dian Indians. A crew of In-
dians filmed the 10-minute
movie, setting it to a ballad that
decries broken treaties.
Other films with some type of
social commentary in the sum-
mer schedule include But What
If the Dream Comes True?
about unfulfilling affluence in
Birmingham, Mich., and High
School, a documentary on
apathy and futility in high
school progr ms.
Karen Higgins, a consultant
for the Audio-Visual Center, put

images

the film program together. She
says she picked the films "on
the basis of quality and what
they contribute to education."
"We certainly look in terms of
the technical aspects of the
films and the accuracy of their
information - if it's that type
of film," she says.
Higgins also searched for
movies that used the medium
"in a very creative way." She
selected a wide variety of -films
for all age levels and in a broad
spectrum of subject areas.
A W.C. Fields comedy, "The
Cat In the Hat, and Macrame,
are also listed in the schedule.
Ferguson Films' Old Man and
the Devil, scheduled for July
17, was shot in Ann Arbor. It
depicts the dreariess of life In
this country for the aged, us-
ing familiar spots such as Is-
land Drive, the Farmers' Mar-
ket, and Canterbury House.
The Summer Film Showcase
has been previewing films for
over 20 years to allow teachers
to evaluate films for possible
classroom use. The movies, how-
ever, are open to the general
public.
'We see it as an enjoyable
thing," Higgins says. It's a
pleasant way to spend an eve-
ning."
Film schedule booklets are
available in the lobby of the
LS&A Bldg.
AA Library
to screen
free flicks
Feature films of mystery and
suspense will be shown in a sum-
mer series sponsored by the
Friends of the Library.
On July 21 and 22 the film will
be Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds
starring Rod Taylor, Tippi Hed-
ren, Suzanne eleshette and Jes-
sica Tandy. In this horrifying
tale set in Northern California,
ordinary birds lunch an attack
on the human race.
Wait Until Dark on July 28 and
29 stars Audrey Hepburn as a
blind woman terrorized by a psy-
chopathic killer, played by Alan
Arkin. Both performers w e r e
no mnated for Oscars for their
work in this thriller.
The third and last film in the
series will be Anatomy of a
Murder on August 4 and 5. This
suspenseful courtroom drama
stars James Stewart, Lee Re-
mick, Ben Gazzara and George
C. Scott and is considered one
of Otto Preminger's best works.
Showings at the Community
Center will be on Thursday eve-
nings July 21 (7 and 9 p.m.),
July 28 (7 and 9 p.m.), and Aug-
ust 4 (7 p.m. only). Meeting room
showings will be on Friday eve-
nings July 22 (7 and 9 p.m.),
July 29 (7 and 9 p.m.), and Au-
gust 5 (4 and 8 p.m.). Admis-
sion is free and open to the pub-
li.

JULY ECLIPSES:
Sky watchers beware!
Sun, moon to disappear

July, a busy month for astro-
nomy enthusiasts, will offer
both a solar and a lunar eclipse,
according to University astron-
omer Hazel Losh.
The solar eclipse will occur
July 10, but will be only par-
tially visible from Michigan,
Losh stated. The eclipse will
begin at about 2:20 p.m. (EST)
TV & Stereo Rentals
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and last approximately 136
minutes.
The total eclipse path will
pass over northern Alaska and
southeastward across Canada,
she said, but will be only par-
tially visible from Michigan.
"The moon will first touch
the western edge of the sun
and will progress until about
three-fourths of ,the sun's sur-
face will be hidden from Michi-
gan observers," Losh said.
The astronomer cautioned
observers from "looking directly
at the sun without adequate
protection."
On July 26, only two weeks
after the solar eclipse, an
eclipse of the moo nwill occur,
Losh noted. "Again, like the
solar eclipse, this one will be
only partially visible from
Michigan."
The lunar eclipse will begin
at about 12:56 a.m. and will
terminate at about 3:37 a.m.,
she added.

AT
PARAPHERNALIA
SATURDAY, JULY 8 10 p.m. - 2 a.m.
215 S. State
Also included: items from Renaissance and Sans Souci

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