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June 21, 1972 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-06-21

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Wednesday, June 21, 1972

MICHIGAN DAILY

Page _Nine

Security Council issues
anti-hijacking statenent
5 "_Air service returned to normal around the world yes-
' 'terday after a 24-hour strike of pilots, and the U.N. Secur-
ity Council spurred by the pilot protest, approved a dec-
laration against hijacking.
Ambassador Lazar Mojson of Yugoslavia , Security
Council president, announced the action after a series of
private meetings and said the 15-nation council had ap-
,":'' proved unanimously the statement calling for effective
F > = measures against hijacking.
{ etThe declaration said council members were "gravely
f' concerned at the threat to the lives of passengers and
crews arising from the hijacking of aircraft and other
unlawful interference with civil aviation."

..:
N+:
-Associated Press
Defense hearing
Defense Secretary Melvin Laird and Adm. Thom as Moorer, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,
discuss Laird's requests for more arms yesterday at a Senate Armed Services Committee meeting.
Laird told the committee that national security would be jeopardized by the Moscow arms agree-
ment "unless there is continued support for an adequate defense budget."
VETO LIKELY:
Senate allocates $2.95 billion
for child-development centers

It also asserted: "Members of
the Security Council condemn
and consider it icessary to put
an end to acts that are direct-
ed against the sately of civil
aviation and that are being per-
petrated in various parts of the
world."
It concluded with the follow-
ing appeals to governments:
-"To take appropriate mea-
sures within their jurisdiction
to deter and prevent such acts
and to take effective measures
to deal with those who commit
such acts."
- -"To expand and intensify
cooperative international efforts
and measures in this field in
conformity with charter obliga-
tions with a view , to ensuring
the maximum safety and relia-
bility of international civil avia-
tion."

,
SHOWS AT 1-3-5-7-9
with
BURT REYNOLDS
RACQUEL WELCH
YUL BRYNNER
FRIDAY: Hitchcock's FRENZY

WASHINGTON (P) - The
Senate passed 73-12 yesterday a
$2.95-billion child-development
bill designed to fund the biggest
program of federally backed
day-care centers in history.
The measure was substantial-
ly modified from a 1971 version
in an effort to meet objections
of President Nixon who killed
last year's measure with a veto.
But, in its closing votes, the
Senate beat back several Re-
publican amendments to carry
out the administration views.
Some GOP Senators said they
believe another veto is likely if
the bill is sent again to the
White House in its present
form.
The Senate vote forwarded
the legislation in to the House.
So far the Education and La-
bor Committee in that branch
has given no indication of when
it plans to act on it.
Sponsors said the bill should
fund 700,000 new day-care
spaces in its first year of full
operation which would double
the number now available.
The care would be free for
children of poverty-level fami-
lies; low- and middle-income
families would pay part of the
cost, and well-off families could
use the day-care centers by pay-
ing the full cost.
Sponsors said that millions
of mothers now work either
through choice or because two
incomes are essential for their
families. Often small children
are left to fend for themselves
now because no arrangements
can be made for their care.
But a few senators strongly
opposed to the legislation insist-
ed that it would accelerate ten-
dencies of families to break up
and deprive children of a moth-
er's care at the time they need
it most.
The Senate rejected, 60 to 25,

an attempt by Sen. Peter Do-
minickualo (R-Colo.) to reduce
the total allocations by $600
million. He said Nixon objected
strenuously to the cost. Defeat-
ed by 49 to 36 was an amend-
ment of Sen. Robert Taft Jr.,
R-Ohio) to cut back on the
number of local sponsors of
child - development programs
from 2,000 to 1,200.
He sought to do this by mak-
ing only groups in cities of 50,-
000 or more population eligible,
instead of towns of 25,000 as the
bill provided.
The Bill's managers were ov-
erridden with 45-38 adoption of
an amendment to permit the
government to turn control of
the new day-care projects over
to the states.
As the bill was originally writ-
ten it gave local sponsors such
as school systems and churches
the primary right tosetup and
run the day-care centers.
Sponsors emphasized that the
care would not be simply cus-
todial. The centers would pro-
vide many services, including
Wanted-Part Time
MARKETING
REP
Campus marketing rep needed
for fall term. Job involves set-
ting up displays & promotions.
Excellent job experience and
substantial pay possible for a
few hours of work a week. For
info send name, address &
phone no. to:
John Gilster
CM&DCo.
1109 Timberlone
St. Louis, Mo. 63122

educational, nutritional, medi-
cal and social.
Sen. Walter Mondale ('D-
Minn.) said the program would
not only offer day care to the
children and their parents.
There also would be -part-day
services like Head Start, pre-
natal service in-the-home tut-
oring, and child development
classes for parents and prospec-
tive parents.
Personalized
CUSTOM IMPRINT
ON
T-Shirts - Sweat Shirts
and Jerseys
WHILE YOU WAIT
Many Colors to Choose From
of
FOLLETY'S
State St. at North University
Ann Arbor

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The Rolling Stones
The Maysles Brothers historic
performance documentary of
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